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Graduate Courses

***Journal Club (Spring 2022) will meet weekly Fridays at 3:30pm.

Evolution-themed graduate courses (Spring 2022)

BSCI 5238/EES 5238. Ecology (Maria Luisa Jorge
Population biology, evolutionary ecology, community structure, with emphasis on species interactions, including competition, predation, and symbiosis. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2238. [3]


BSCI 5247. Paleobiology (Larisa DeSantis)

Macroevolutionary processes as observed through the fossil record. Inference of evolutionary relationships, physiology, reproduction, behavior, and ecology. Fundamentals of paleobiology, paleoecology, paleoclimates, macroecology, biogeography, geology, geochemistry, anthropology, and conservation paleobiology. Effects of climate change and human impacts, in deep-time. [3]


BSCI 5890. Special Topics – Evolution (Nicole Creanza)

Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once by permission of the director of graduate studies. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]


***BSCI 6336. Seminar in EEB – Journal Club (Antonis Rokas)
Weekly discussions lead by faculty, postdocs, and enrolled students in evolutionary studies fields. Contact Dr. Antonis Rokas for permission.


EES 5990. Mass Extinctions (Simon Darroch)

Synthesizing causes, consequences, and dynamics of past mass extinction events. Using fossil records to interpret current and future trends in biodiversity loss. [3]


NURO 8327. Graduate Neuroanatomy (Suzana Herculano-Houzel)
This is a course on functional and comparative neuroanatomy, that is, on the structure of nervous systems and their commonalities and differences across different types of animals, including humans, and how that structure underlies function and behavior. The course is offered to up to 40 undergraduate and 10 graduate students, and consists of lectures that will also be heavily based on the discussion of reading materials that must be read prior to each class. Anatomical demonstrations will occur in the classroom. [3]


PSY 5780. The Visual System (Frank Tong)
Interdisciplinary analysis of the origins of mind, with particular emphasis on the mind/brain as a product of biological evolution. [3]


Evolution-themed graduate courses (All)

ANTH 6345. Human Evolutionary Genetics. (Last Offered Fall 2021 – Jada Benn Torres)
Core issues in human evolution and population genetics. Molecular evidence for the origin of modern humans, reconstruction of human migrations, race, and detection of admixture between populations. Implications for human disease. Offered on a graded basis only. Prerequisite or corequisite: BSCI 1100, BSCI 1105, or BSCI 1510. [3]


BSCI 5238/EES 5238. Ecology (Spring 2022 – Maria Luisa Jorge
Population biology, evolutionary ecology, community structure, with emphasis on species interactions, including competition, predation, and symbiosis. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2238. [3]


BSCI 5239. Evolution of Behavior (Last offered Spring 2018 – Patrick Abbot)
Theoretical and empirical research on the evolution of behavior. Evolutionary approaches to the study of animal behavior, including the role of behavior in foraging, competition, predator-prey interactions, and sociality. Behavioral adaptations and their roles in sexual selection, mating systems, and animal communication. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3239. [3]


BSCI 5247. Paleobiology (Spring 2022 – Larisa DeSantis)

Macroevolutionary processes as observed through the fossil record. Inference of evolutionary relationships, physiology, reproduction, behavior, and ecology. Fundamentals of paleobiology, paleoecology, paleoclimates, macroecology, biogeography, geology, geochemistry, anthropology, and conservation paleobiology. Effects of climate change and human impacts, in deep-time. [3]


BSCI 5247. Molecular Evolution (Last offered Spring 2015 – Daniel Funk)
The theory of evolution at the molecular level. The evolution of DNA and RNA sequences, proteins, and genome structures will be studied using models from population genetics and comparative approaches. Molecular clocks, the evolution of gene regulation and globin genes, molecular phylogeny, and human evolution. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3247. [3]


BSCI 5890. Special Topics – Evolution (Spring 2022 – Nicole Creanza)

Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once by permission of the director of graduate studies. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]


BSCI 6336. Seminar in EEB – Journal Club (Spring 2022 – Antonis Rokas)
Weekly discussions lead by faculty, postdocs, and enrolled students in evolutionary studies fields. Contact Dr. Antonis Rokas for permission.


EES 5990. Mass Extinctions (Spring 2022 – Simon Darroch)

Synthesizing causes, consequences, and dynamics of past mass extinction events. Using fossil records to interpret current and future trends in biodiversity loss. [3]


EES 7620. Macroecology and Biogeography (Last offered Spring 2016 – Larisa DeSantis)
Integration of evolutionary biology, paleobiology, ecology, and biogeography to understand interactions between organisms and their environments over large spatial and temporal scales, including in ancient ecosystems. The discipline of macroecology; nature of species, niches, and communities; abundance and distribution of species; species diversity; composition and assembly of continental biotas; allometry and body size; evolutionary dynamics; methodological advances. [3]


EES 7640. Topics in Macroevolution (Last offered Fall 2018 – Larisa DeSantis)
Evolutionary processes that operate on geological time scales. Evolutionary theory; systematics; speciation and extinction; evolutionary benefits of sexual reproduction; co-evolution; convergence; biogeography; and relevance of evolution to modern ecology and conservation. Effects of abiotic processes on the evolution of terrestrial and marine organisms. [3]


NURO 8327. Graduate Neuroanatomy (Spring 2022 – Suzana Herculano-Houzel)
This is a course on functional and comparative neuroanatomy, that is, on the structure of nervous systems and their commonalities and differences across different types of animals, including humans, and how that structure underlies function and behavior. The course is offered to up to 40 undergraduate and 10 graduate students, and consists of lectures that will also be heavily based on the discussion of reading materials that must be read prior to each class. Anatomical demonstrations will occur in the classroom. [3]


NURS 6812. Evolution of Midwifery in America (Last offered Fall 2021 – Jeremy Neal)
This course surveys the historical and social literature of midwifery nursing and medicine in the context of the care of women and infants. Development of midwifery and the professional organization are analyzed and interpreted. Development of the midwife and nurse-midwife are examined in relation to societal, economic, and political issues involved in health care systems from the 18th century to present. Dynamics that affect midwifery and medical models of care will be discussed to provide critical understanding of the health care of women and persons accessing sexual and/or reproductive care in America. Prerequisite: none. [2]


PSY 5780. The Visual System (Spring 2022 – Frank Tong)
Interdisciplinary analysis of the origins of mind, with particular emphasis on the mind/brain as a product of biological evolution. [3]


REL 7058. Religion, Science and Evolution (Last offered Fall 2017 – Volney Gay)
The course is designed into five sections: Section one is on Darwin’s core concepts of evolution; two is on the response to Darwin by religionists, among many; three is on contemporary uses of Darwinian theory to model religion and other value systems; four is on attempts to mimic human cognition using immense computing power, e.g., IBM’s “Watson” system which won a famous “Jeopardy” game against human opponents; five is on ethical implications and further questions. [3]