Skip to main content

Geoffrey F. Woodman

Associate Professor of Psychology
Director of Graduate Studies
Co-Director of National Eye Institute T32 to the Vanderbilt Vision Research Center

Geoffrey Woodman's research examines how mechanisms of visual attention and memory influence how we interact with the world around us. Specifically, how the primate visual system performs figure-ground segregation, attentional deployment during the processing of complex scenes, temporary storage of information in visual working memory, and cognitive control during task performance.

Lab Website

Representative Publications

 Maxcey, A.M. & Woodman, G.F. (2019).  From start to finish: A practical guide to becoming a scientist in psychology and neuroscience.  San Diego, CA: Cognella, Inc. 

 Servant, M., Cassey, P., Logan, G.D. & Woodman, G.F. (2018). The neural bases of automaticity.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 44(3), 440-464.PMCID: PMC5862722.

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Park, S. & Woodman, G.F. (2019). Localization and elimination of attentional dysfunction in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 45(1), 96-105.PMCID: PMC6293221.

 Cosman, J.D., Lowe, K.A., Zinke, W., Woodman, G.F., & Schall, J.D. (2018). Prefrontal control of visual distraction.  Current Biology, 28(3), 414-420.PMCID: PMC5922980.

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Cosman, J.D., Fukuda, K., & Woodman, G.F. (2017). Using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) to understand cognitive processing. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 79(1), 3-23.PMCID: PMC5539401.

 Fukuda, K. & Woodman, G.F. (2017). Visual working memory buffers information retrieved from visual long-term memory.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 114(20), 5306-5311. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1617874114. PMCID: PMC5441785.

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Xiao, W., McClenahan, L.J. & Woodman, G.F. (2016). Electrical stimulation of visual cortex can immediately improve spatial vision. Current Biology, 26(14), 1867-1872.  PMCID: PMC4961578.

 Reinhart, R.M.G., McClenahan, L.J. & Woodman, G.F. (2016). Attention’s accelerator. Psychological Science, 27, 790-798.PMCID: PMC4899122

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Zhu, J., Park, S. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Synchronizing theta oscillations with direct-current stimulation restores adaptive control in schizophrenia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 112(30), 9448-9453. PMCID: PMC4522782.

 Reinhart, R.M.G. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Enhancing long-term memory with stimulation tunes visual attention in one trial. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112, 625-630. PMCID: PMC4299199.

 Fukuda, K. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Predicting and improving recognition memory using single-trial electrophysiology. Psychological Science, 26, 1026-1037. PMC4643667.

 Maxcey, A.M., Fukuda, K., Song, W.S. & Woodman, G.F.  (2015). Using electrophysiology to demonstrate that cueing affects long-term memory storage over the short term. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22(5), 1349-1357. PMCID: PMC4510034.

 Reinhart, R.M.G. McClenahan, L.J. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Visualizing trumps vision when training attention. Psychological Science, 26, 1114-1122. PMCID: PMC4504754.

 Reinhart, R.M.G. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). The surprising temporal specificity of direct-current stimulation. Trends in Neurosciences, 38, 459-461. 

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Zhu, J., Park, S. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Synchronizing theta oscillations with direct-current stimulation restores adaptive control in schizophrenia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 112(30), 9448-9453. PMCID: PMC4522782.

 Reinhart, R.M.G., Zhu, J., Park, S. & Woodman, G.F. (2015). Medial-frontal stimulation enhances learning in schizophrenia by restoring prediction-error signaling. Journal of Neuroscience, 35, 12232-12240. PMCID: PMC4556788.

 Kang, M.-S. & Woodman, G.F. (2014).  Probing the role of microsaccades in the generation of human neurophysiological index of visual working memory maintenance. Neuropsychologia, 56, 63-72. PMCID: PMC3974880. 

 Reinhart, R.M.G. & Woodman, G.F. (2014).   Causal control of medial-frontal cortex governs performance monitoring and learning. Journal of Neuroscience, 34, 4214-4227. PMCID: PMC3960465.

 Godlove, D.C., Maier, A., Woodman, G.F. & Schall, J.D. (2014).  Microcircuitry of agranular frontal cortex relative to the canonical cortical microcircuit. Journal of Neuroscience, 34, 5355-5369. PMCID: PMC3983808.

 Reinhart, R.M.G. & Woodman, G.F. (2014).   High stakes trigger the use of multiple memories to enhance the control of attention. Cerebral Cortex, 24, 2022-2035. PMCID: PMC4089381.


Honors

Young Investigator Award, Vision Sciences Society, 2012

Troland Award from the National Academy of Sciences, 2016