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Emily Conder

Graduate Student
Research Area: Developmental Science


Social Cognitive Development

Emily is interested in the development of social cognition in early to middle childhood, as well as in adults. Most recently, she has been investigating how overhearing messages about novel social groups might influence children's intergroup attitudes. As well as examining how adults' moral judgements change based on the presence of mitigating evidence. 

Lab Website

Representative Publications

Lane, J. D., Conder, E. B., & Rottman, J. (2019). The influence of direct and overheard messages on children’s attitudes toward novel social groups. Child Development. doi: 10.1111/cdev.13238

Conder, E.B. & Lane, J.D. (March 2019). Developmental Trends in Children’s Receptivity to Overheard Messages about Social Groups. Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Conference in Baltimore.

Conder, E.B., Jaeger, C., Rottman, J., Lane, J.D. (July 2018). Violators’ extenuating circumstances: When and how they influence punishment judgments. Presented at the meeting of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology in Ann Arbor.

Conder, E.B., & Lane, J.D. (October 2017). How informants’ qualities influence children’s evaluation of novel social groups. Presented at the Cognitive Development Society Biennial Conference in Portland.

Lane, J. D., Conder, E. B., & Rottman, J. (April 2017). Effects of direct and overheard testimony on children’s evaluations of novel social groups. In Rottman, J. (Chair), Words Can Hurt: Dangers of Testimony in Leading Children to Negatively Evaluate Others. Presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Conference in Austin.