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CCN Brown Bag Series
August 24, 2016

Dr. James T. Townsend, Distinguished Professor

Rudy Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Indiana University

http://www.indiana.edu/~psymodel/

Wednesday, 8/24/2016

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 113

Assessing the Capacity and Architecture of Information Processing: Applications to Visual Perception

Systems factorial technology (SFT) is a theory-driven set of experimental methodologies, class of psychological models and data analytic techniques.  Their goal is to experimentally identify a set of underlying perceptual, cognitive and/or action characteristics within psychological systems.  The targeted processing characteristics pertain to many psychological systems and related experimental tasks.  That is, they are not confined to particular perceptual or cognitive processes.  This talk will focus on visual perception and I will start by pointing out a few examples of application within this confine.  Then, I offer a quick, but hopefully comprehensible, introduction to the overall theory and methodology.  There will be some math for the resident math geeks (like the presenter), but the slides will be designed so that everyone can follow the general logic, principles and how to apply the methods.  Finally, two detailed examples of application will be offered.  Shameless promotion for an upcoming anthology of application of SFT will magically appear during the proceedings.


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
August 25, 2016

Jeff Schall PhD

Department of Psychology

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Frontal Eye Field: The Story of a Cortical Area

  

This presentation will survey how the frontal eye field (FEF) was discovered and defined as a distinct cortical area in nonhuman primates and humans. It will (1) summarize the history of research on FEF from the 19th into the 21st century, (2) discuss its contributions to motor, visual and cognitive functions, (3) describe its location across primate species including humans, and (4) highlight lingering questions about its location, organization and functional properties.

 


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
August 30, 2016

Sarah Jaser Ph.D.

Department of Pediatrics

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

http://pediatrics.mc.vanderbilt.edu/directory/profile/sarah-jaser.12394

Stress and Coping in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Key Findings and Future Directions

I will be discussing my research related to identifying risk and protective factors in youth with type 1 diabetes, and developing family-based interventions to promote the best outcomes


CCN Brown Bag Series
August 31, 2016

Kevin Dieter

Department of Psychology( Blake Lab) 

Vanderbilt University

Wednesday, 8/31/16

12:10pm

WH 113

Seeing things both ways: how the visual system chooses between equivalent states

(This talk is a preliminary job-style talk, feedback encouraged!)

Though seeing the world feels effortless, perception is an active process through which a useful interpretation of the visual environment is created. In its construction of reality, our brains combine sensory information with our goals and expectations, all of which contribute to our visual experiences. However, this process does not always have a clear resolution – at times our visual system encounters information consistent with more than one plausible interpretation. Such scenarios can result in what is known as multistable vision, during which one’s visual experience alternates back-and-forth between the available options without ever settling on a definitive solution. By focusing on a particular instance of multistable vision (known as binocular rivalry) that arises when the left and right eye view drastically different images, my research seeks to unravel the complex interplay of visual mechanisms responsible for the alternate selection of perceptual interpretations. One particular focus has been on the role of visual attention, which appears essential for driving the typical dynamics of binocular rivalry and yet holds only modest sway over which interpretation will dominate. To understand this seemingly contradictory pattern, I have studied the interactions between visual attention and the mechanisms of binocular vision to understand what underlies this attentional limitation. These results have shed light on the processes that merge the images in our left and right eyes into a single percept, and have exposed critical factors that drive the efficacy of visual attention’s influence.


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
September 1, 2016

Sandra Dos Santos

Department of Psychology (Herculano Lab)

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
September 1, 2016

Sandra Dos Santos

Department of Psychology (Herculano Lab)

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
September 6, 2016

Sun-Joo Cho PhD

Department of Psychology & Human Development

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Detecting Intervention Effects in a Cluster Randomized Design

using Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling for Binary Responses

 

Multilevel modeling (MLM) is frequently used to detect group differences, such as an intervention effect in a pre-test-post-test cluster-randomized design. Group differences on the post-test scores are detected by controlling for pre-test scores as a proxy variable for unobserved factors that predict future attributes. The pre-test and post-test scores that are most often used in MLM are summed item responses (or total scores). In prior research, there have been concerns regarding measurement error in the use of total scores in using MLM. To correct for measurement error in the covariate and outcome, a theoretical justification for the use of multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) has been established. However, MSEM for binary responses has not been widely applied to detect intervention effects (group differences) in intervention studies. In this talk, the use of MSEM will be demonstrated for intervention studies. Further, the consequences of using MLM instead of MSEM will be discussed in detecting group differences.


CCN Brown Bag Series
September 7, 2016

Dakota Lindsey

Department of Psychology ( Logan Lab)

Vanderbilt University

Wednesday, 9/7/16

12:10pm

WH 113

Title and Abstract TBA


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
September 8, 2016

Emily Rockoff Turner

Department of Psychology (Kaas Lab)

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


The Program for Music, Mind & Society at Vanderbilt: Annual Symposium
September 12, 2016

The Program for Music, Mind & Society at Vanderbilt announces a Call for Poster Abstracts for our Annual Symposium on September 12, 2016. Additionally, the Program is happy to announce that registration is now open. Please share the following information widely within your department and with other colleagues.

Proposal Submission Information:

Abstract content: Brief abstracts (100 words) should summarize one or more research projects related to systematic and scientific study of how music works in the mind and/or in society.  Poster content should be targeted to a broad scientific audience; as such, some posters may include data, while others may describe an emerging line of research. Both are encouraged. 

Who can submit: Submissions are welcome from the Vanderbilt community as well as other institutions. Cross-disciplinary work is encouraged, including but not limited to submissions from the fields of Education, Psychology, Neuroscience, Communications, Medicine, Music, and Sociology.  

How to submit an abstract: Submit your abstract online here until Friday, July 22.

Presentation guidelines: At least one representative from each poster should be available to present at the poster session during the symposium. 

Registration: You do not need to present in order to attend! We do ask that all attendees (including presenters) register at this link: https://is.gd/MMSregistration. There is no cost to register for the symposium. Registration allows us to calculate an accurate headcount so that we can plan appropriately for supplies, food, A/V needs, etc. So we greatly appreciate you registering in advance.

More event details, including lodging information is on the symposium website.

Key dates:

Poster Abstract Submission Deadline:   Friday, July 22

Symposium registration deadline:         Tuesday, September 6

Event date:                                         Monday, September 12 

Event Leadership:

Program Chair, Sara L. Beck, PhD candidate, Program for Music, Mind & Society at Vanderbilt

Symposium Chair, Reyna L. Gordon, PhD, Director, Music Cognition Lab, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Questions/Mailing list:

Contact VanderbiltMMSEvents@gmail.com with questions.

If you are interested in keeping abreast of all Program for the Music, Mind & Society at Vanderbilt events or updates, please join their list serv. To do so, e-mail MUSICANDBRAIN@LIST.VANDERBILT.EDU and ask to be added to the Music and Brain listserv.


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