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CiM Psychiatry Interest Group Meeting (with STC Training on Talking to Patients about Suicide)
September 26, 2016

Come to the first CIM Psychiatry Interest Group meeting of the 2016-2017 year!

We will be having Vanderbilt Psychiatry Residents there to teach students on their strategies for talking to patients about Mental Health and Suicide. This will be especially helpful for any pre-clinical students who are working at Shade Tree Clinic or any students interested in preparing for clinical medicine in any specialty outpatient or inpatient!

Please also join if you are interested in joining the CIM Psychiatry Interest Group for the year! 


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
September 27, 2016

David Schlundt PhD

Department of Psychology

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

“The Healthy Weight Monitoring Study: Using Big Data Tools to Study the Microstructure of Everyday Eating Behavior”

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created as part of the Affordable Care Act, has funded a large-scale effort to create nationwide networks that can use electronic health records data to enable large-scale observational studies and clinical trials.  Vanderbilt is collaborating with Meharry Medical College, Vanderbilt Healthcare Affiliated Network, Greenway, Duke University, University of North Carolina, and Health Sciences South Carolina to create the Mid South Clinical Research Data Network (Mid South CDRN).  By combining these health systems, the Mid South CDRN can access health data for up to 30 million individuals.

                During the first phase of PCORI funding, each of the CDRN’s created a prospective cohort study, the Healthy Weight Cohort Study.  Patients within the CDRN were enrolled, completed a baseline survey, and provided consent to access electronic health records retrospectively and prospectively. The Mid South CDRN enrolled approximately 15,000 people in the Healthy Weight Cohort Study (HWCS). In order to demonstrate the feasibility of recruiting participants into a more involved study, we initiated the Healthy Weight Monitoring Study (HWMS).  The goal of the HWMS was to have a sample of participants in the HWCS monitor their food intake for two weeks using a web-based tool for collecting Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data.  The EMA tool allowed participants to describe the environmental, social and emotional context of each meal or snack; characterize their eating behavior; and capture location using the GPS features of the smart phone.  The EMA data is linked with the baseline questionnaire from the HWCS, and will eventually be linked to electronic health records data.

We now have a data set from 334 participants who documented 12,220 meals and snacks. I will describe the methods we used to enroll and manage participation online, the tools used to collect the EMA data, and the resulting data set.  I will focus on strategies for analyzing data by focusing on the relationship between daily mood changes, location, meal type, and overeating. I will focus on how to extract information about daily patterns from the repeated measures data, and on using mixed-linear models to analyze within person associations between context and behavior.


CCN Brown Bag Series (Co-hosted with VVRC)
September 28, 2016

Dennis Levi

Professor of Vision Science & Optometry

University of California, Berkeley

http://vision.berkeley.edu/?p=417

4:00pm

MRBIII rm. 1220

“Recovering stereovision”

Stereopsis is the impression of three-dimensionality—of objects “popping out in depth”—that most humans get when they view real-world objects with both eyes, based on binocular disparity—the differences between the two retinal images of the same world. However, a substantial proportion of the population is stereoblind or stereo deficient due to strabismus and/or amblyopia. This impairment may have a substantial impact on visuomotor tasks, difficulties in playing sports in children and locomoting safely in older adults. Impaired stereopsis may also limit career options. This talk will review several promising new approaches to recovering stereopsis through perceptual learning and videogame play. 


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
September 29, 2016

Samantha Hauser

Department of Hearing and Speech

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

“Behavioral Consequences of Cochlear Histopathology Following Noise Overexposure in Nonhuman Primates”

Noise exposure is one of the most common etiologies of hearing loss. Though it has been studied in other animal models, the nonhuman primate model of noise induced hearing loss allows for studies of anatomy, physiology, and behavior within the same subjects under controlled exposure conditions. We found that macaque monkeys needed to be exposed to a more intense sound to cause overt hearing loss compared to rodents. These permanent changes in physiological measures and cochlear histopathology are correlated with impairment on variety of behavioral detection tasks. Detection of tones and masked tones and the bandwidth of auditory perceptual filters are affected in a frequency specific manner. These changes are correlated with the frequency specific destruction of inner and outer hair cells. Detection of tones in modulated maskers post-exposure showed no difference from steady state noise maskers, whereas pre-exposure results show a threshold benefit in maskers with low frequency modulations. Such temporal processing impairments were likely related to inner hair cell ribbon synaptopathy. These results reveal that behavioral effects of noise exposure are similar to those seen in humans and provide preliminary information on the correlations between noise exposure, cochlear histopathology, and perceptual changes in hearing.


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
October 4, 2016

Maureen MCHugo PhD

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/psychiatry/faculty/primary/mchugomk

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

“Increased Amplitude Of Low Frequency Fluctuations But Normal Functional Connectivity Of The Hippocampus In Schizophrenia”

Clinical and preclinical studies have established that the hippocampus is hyperactive in schizophrenia, making it a possible biomarker for drug development. Increased hippocampal connectivity, which can be studied conveniently with resting state imaging, has been proposed as a readily accessible corollary of hippocampal hyperactivity. In recent work, we tested the hypothesis that hippocampal activity and connectivity are increased in patients with schizophrenia using several common methods. Our results indicate that although intrinsic hippocampal activity may be increased in schizophrenia, this finding may not extend to aggregate functional connectivity. Neuroimaging methods that assess hippocampal activity may be more promising for the identification of a biomarker for schizophrenia.


CCN Brown Bag Series
October 5, 2016

Jennifer Trueblood

Department of Psychology

Vanderbilt University

Wednesday, 10/5/2016

12:10pm

WH 113

“The Healthy Weight Monitoring Study: Using Big Data Tools to Study the Microstructure of Everyday Eating Behavior”

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created as part of the Affordable Care Act, has funded a large-scale effort to create nationwide networks that can use electronic health records data to enable large-scale observational studies and clinical trials.  Vanderbilt is collaborating with Meharry Medical College, Vanderbilt Healthcare Affiliated Network, Greenway, Duke University, University of North Carolina, and Health Sciences South Carolina to create the Mid South Clinical Research Data Network (Mid South CDRN).  By combining these health systems, the Mid South CDRN can access health data for up to 30 million individuals.

During the first phase of PCORI funding, each of the CDRN’s created a prospective cohort study, the Healthy Weight Cohort Study.  Patients within the CDRN were enrolled, completed a baseline survey, and provided consent to access electronic health records retrospectively and prospectively. The Mid South CDRN enrolled approximately 15,000 people in the Healthy Weight Cohort Study (HWCS). In order to demonstrate the feasibility of recruiting participants into a more involved study, we initiated the Healthy Weight Monitoring Study (HWMS).  The goal of the HWMS was to have a sample of participants in the HWCS monitor their food intake for two weeks using a web-based tool for collecting Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data.  The EMA tool allowed participants to describe the environmental, social and emotional context of each meal or snack; characterize their eating behavior; and capture location using the GPS features of the smart phone.  The EMA data is linked with the baseline questionnaire from the HWCS, and will eventually be linked to electronic health records data.

We now have a data set from 334 participants who documented 12,220 meals and snacks. I will describe the methods we used to enroll and manage participation online, the tools used to collect the EMA data, and the resulting data set.  I will focus on strategies for analyzing data by focusing on the relationship between daily mood changes, location, meal type, and overeating. I will focus on how to extract information about daily patterns from the repeated measures data, and on using mixed-linear models to analyze within person associations between context and behavior.


ACCRE Special Presentation
October 5, 2016

Using GPUs on ACCRE

4pm, Wednesday October 5, 2016

Wilson Hall 316

Members of Vanderbilt's ACCRE (Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education) will be giving a presentation and holding a Q&A session on using GPUs on ACCRE’s high performance computing cluster. Labs potentially interested in using their GPU capabilities should try to have someone attend.

 

GPUs for computing are basically the same technology (and often the exact same physical hardware) used for graphics/video cards in PCs. Your video display is a large matrix of (pixel) data (i.e., millions of them for a high resolution monitor). GPUs are a computing architecture that can perform operations on these matrices in parallel very quickly (responsible for the amazing things you see in advanced video games). GPUs for computing basically use the engine within the graphic card to perform operations on large arrays and matrices of data (e.g., image and signal processing) without having them displayed on the computer monitor. Hence any computation (analysis, simulation) that can be written to take advantage of the parallel architecture on GPUs can, at least in principle, perform those computations orders of magnitude more quickly than on a CPU (yes, 100x faster for the right problem programmed the right way). Unfortunately, it is not always trivial to port programs that run on a CPU to a GPU and get those speed gains. Some labs may be able to take advantage of software others have written and simply want to know whether and how they can run this software on ACCRE; other labs may be interested in exploring whether and how their current analysis/simulation programs can be rewritten to take advantage of a GPU architecture.


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
October 6, 2016

Pamela Beck Drury

Private Clinical Practice

Nashville, TN.

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

“Neurofeedback: Combining Principles of Biofeedback, Operant Conditioning, and Neuroplasticity to Improve Clinical Outcomes”

For decades biofeedback has used principles of operant conditioning to help people learn to self-regulate physiology. Neurofeedback is a type of biofeedback in which these principles are applied to brain activity. Advances in technology, such as quantitative EEG, allow us to assess for and train any dysregulation in brain activity identified through comparison with a normative database. By combining principles of neuroplasticity and operant conditioning, individuals can learn to self-regulate activity associated with a number of clinical conditions, including ADHD, anxiety, depression, migraine headaches, postconcussive syndrome, stroke, seizure disorder, and traumatic brain injury. Outcome research is promising for a number of clinical presentations, though more scientifically rigorous research is needed.

 


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
October 11, 2016

Suzanne Avery

Department of Psychiatry

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


CCN Brown Bag Series
October 12, 2016

Patryk Laurent, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, Director of R&D

Brain Corporation

San Diego, CA

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Rm. 113

Title & Abstract TBA


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