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Robert Fox

Professor of Psychology
Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Investigator, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development

Fox pursues a program of research on visual perception that embraces, variously, infants, children, normal, mildly mentally retarded, and elderly adults. Major topics are binocular visual phenomenon such as global stereopsis, rivalry and fusion. Related interests are perception of 3D space and global motion. Recently, he discovered profound deficits in visual perception in the mildly retarded. These heretofore unsuspected anomalies provide a new perspective on intelligence and cognitive function.

Representative Publications

  • Fox, R., Oross, S. (1992). Perceptual deficits in mentally retarded adults. In N.W. Bray (Ed.), International review of research in mental retardation, 18, 1-27. New York Academic Press.
  • Mauk, D.L., Fox, R. (1995). Effects of multiple depth cues and viewing conditions on the Ponzo illusion. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science , 36(9), 8368.
  • Patterson, R., Bowd, C., Phinney, R., Fox, F. and Lehmkuhle, S. (1995). Disparity tuning of the stereoscopic (cyclopean) motion aftereffect. Vision Research, 35, 21 (in press).
  • Fox, R. (1998). Perception, mental retardation and intelligence. In Hoffman R., Sherrick, M. and Warm, J. (Eds). Psychology Beyond the Threshold. Washington, DC: APA Books.
  • Fox, R. Sinatra, R. B., Mooney, M. A., Feurer, I. D. & Butler, M. G. (1999). Visual capacity and Prader-Willi syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, 36(6), 1-7
  • Fox, R., Yang, G. S., Feurer, I. D., Butler, M. G., & Thompson, T. (2001). Kinetic form discrimination in Prader-Willi syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 45(4), 317-325
  • Fox, R. (2001). Vision for the future. [An invited review of the book Vision Science: Photons to Phenomenology by Stephen E. Palmer]. Contemporary Psychology: The APA Review of Books, 46(3), 272-276
  • Fox, R. (in press) Introduction. In: D. Alais & Blake (Eds.), Binocular rivalry and perceptual bistability

Honors

Fellow American Psychological Association

  • Fellow American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • Charter Fellow American Psychological Society
  • Fellow American Psychological Association
  • Fellow American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • Charter Fellow American Psychological Society