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Faculty Advisor

Jon Kaas

Contact Information

Email
315-322-5527

Research Area

  • Neuroscience
  • Education

    M.A. - Anthropology, George Washington University (2011)

    B.A. - Philosophy and Anthropology, Saint Louis University (2007)

     

    Curriculum Vitae

    Societies

    American Psychological Association

    JB Johnston Club for Evolutionary Neuroscience

    The Cajal Club

    Society for Neuroscience

    American Association of Physical Anthropologists

    Dan Miller

    Ph.D. Candidate
    Research Area: Neuroscience


    Functional organization and Cellular composition of Sensorimotor systems in primates

    Daniel J. Miller is a Doctoral Candidate in the Neuroscience Program in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Prior to joining Vanderbilt, Dan completed training in Philosophy and Primate Behavior (B.A. Saint Louis University), as well as Evolutionary Neuroscience (M.A. George Washington University). Dan’s original research into the evolution of brain development, comparing the trajectory of neocortical myelination in humans, chimpanzees and prosimian primates has been featured in PNAS Science sessions: What makes us human (Jan 2013), Neurology Today: How does myelination maturation affect thought and behavior? (Nov 2012), The Lancet Neurology (Oct 2012), ScienceDaily and ScienceNOW (Sep 2012). Dan has also published a book chapter, “Evolution  and Development of Language”, in Advances in Evolutionary Developmental Biology (2013), and a review article on brain development. Additional published work includes a research article and a review paper comparing quantitative approaches to determining the cellular composition of the brain. More recently, Dan’s research has expanded to include the sensorimotor system in primates, utilizing quantitative approaches to understanding the plasticity of the somatosensory system in cases of congenital deformation and following trauma to the spinal cord, as well as exploring the physiological organization of higher-order brain areas necessary to coordinate complex movements.

     

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