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Psychological Sciences

 

 

 

  “Psychological Sciences at Vanderbilt represents a diverse group of scholars in the Department of Psychology in the College Arts and Science, the Department of Psychology and Human Development in Peabody College, and faculty in allied disciplines across the university. Psychological Sciences combines breadth across the traditional domains of academic psychology with depth in specific programs of inquiry likely to contribute to solutions of major scientific, social, and psychological problems.

The graduate program in Psychological Sciences focuses on psychological theory and the development of original empirical research. Students are admitted to work toward the Ph.D. degree in the following areas:

Many of our faculty also participate in an Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vanderbilt.

The Department of Psychology and Human Development in Peabody College offer undergraduate majors in Child Development, Cognitive Studies, and Child Studies, as well as a Master of Education program in Child Studies. The Department of Psychology in the Colleges of Art and Science offers an undergraduate major in Psychology.


Recent News

  • Congratulations to Ben and Anat!

    November 26, 2014—Dr. Benjamin-Tamber Rosenau and Anat Fintzi, post-doctoral fellow and graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. René Marois, respectively, have won the best poster award at the 2014 Object Perception, visual Attention, and visual Memory (OPAM) annual conference held in Long Beach, CA, for their work on the spatial resolution of visual working memory. This award is given in recognition of the best research (poster division) presented at this conference.
  • Dr. Kei Fukuda wins the APA Division 3 award for best Psychonomic Society poster!

    November 24, 2014—We would like to congratulate Dr. Kei Fukuda, postdoctoral researcher in Prof. Geoff Woodman’s lab, for winning the American Psychological Association’s Division 3 award for best Psychonomic Society poster at the annual meeting in Long Beach, California. This prestigious early career award recognizes excellent work in the experimental domain. Great work, Kei!
  • Congratulations Kris!

    October 27, 2014—Kris Preacher won the Tanaka Award for Best Article of 2013 in the journal Multivariate Behavioral Research. This award was given by the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology for the article: Preacher, K.J., Zhang, G., Kim, C., & Mels, G. (2013). Choosing the optimal number of factors in exploratory factor analysis: A model selection perspective. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 48, 28-56.
  • Welcome Anita Disney!

    October 2, 2014—The Department of Psychological Sciences would like to welcome our newest faculty member. here is a news piece on her work.

    Click here.

  • Congratulations, Pooja!

    September 30, 2014—Pooja Balaram, a graduate student in Jon Kaas' lab, has won the 2014 Krieg Cortical Scholar Prize awarded by the Cajal Club Foundation to a junior neuroscientist who has conducted exemplary research on the cerebral cortex and/or its connections.
  • Congratulations to Vanderbilt all-University Undergraduate Research Fair award winners!

    September 23, 2014—"We would like to extend a hearty congratulations to our undergraduate students who made award winning presentations in Vanderbilt’s recent Undergraduate Research Fair.” From A&S Psychology First Place Julia Zhu ’15 – Psychology “Improving Error Monitoring in Schizophrenia Through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation” Advisor: Dr. Sohee Park, Psychology In a tie for Second PlaceSydney Waitz-Kudia ’15 – Psychology and English “Media Influence on Non-Suicidal Self-Injury” Advisor: Dr. David Cole, Psychology & Human Development From Peabody Psychology First Place Meghan Collins ’15 – Neuroscience & Cognitive Studies “Decoding the deficit: across-task analysis of memory impairments in schizophrenia” Dr. Sean Polyn, Psychology In a tie for Second Place Junyi Chu ’15 – Child Development & Cognitive Studies “The Role of Phonological Awareness and Inhibition in Reading” Dr. Bethany Rittle-Johnson, Psychology & Human Development
  • Maier receives Society of Neuroscience Career Award. Congratulations Alex!

    September 3, 2014—Assistant Professor of Psychology Alexander Maier has been selected to receive the Society for Neuroscience's Janett Rosenberg Trubatch Career Development Award for 2014. The purpose of the award, which is given to only two individuals each year, is "to recognize individuals who have demonstrated originality and creativity in research and to promote success during academic transitions prior to tenure." Maier was recognized for his efforts to understand the basic mystery of how perception arises from neural activities. A prime focus of his research program is to differentiate between the neural circuitry that is involved in visual perception and sensory activity that does not attain the level of conscious awareness. His work has important implications for treating patients with visual disorders characterized by an inability to perceive or recognize certain types of visual images. He is also one of a handful of scientists studying the relationship between the electrical activity in the brain and the variations in blood flow that are measured by the brain mapping technique fMRI, the most commonly used and most reliable method for measuring neural responses in the human brain- Recipients receive a $2,000 award and complimentary registration to the society's annual meeting.

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