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Sarah Jordan Welch-Moore

Therapist


My goal when working with clients is to help them navigate the challenges that come from their experiences of trauma. As a systematic practitioner, I work with clients to recognize the ways their unique identities are essential in understanding their experiences and relationships, and this must be honored in the therapy room. I hope to foster autonomy and growth through the therapeutic process, and believe everyone is deserving of dignity and respect. Through a trauma-informed lens, I work to support students in their work towards healing, and realizing their own resilience.

 

Sarah Jordan is a Licensed Master Social Worker and holds a Master of Social Work from the University of Washington. She is currently enrolled in the Doctor of Social Work program at the University of Tennessee. Previously, Sarah Jordan served as a Prevention Educator and Victim Resource Specialist with Vanderbilt’s Project Safe Center from 2015-2020, where she worked with students, staff, and faculty impacted by interpersonal violence. Before beginning her career at Vanderbilt, Sarah Jordan worked in a variety of settings including non-profit organizations, K-12 schools, hospitals, domestic violence shelters, and sexual assault agencies. Sarah Jordan is  committed to furthering communal knowledge about issues of violence and the layered identities of survivors including gender, race, class, ability, and sexuality. She has been working with survivors of sexual violence for over ten years. Sarah Jordan’s focus is in supporting survivors, specifically examining the relationship with trauma and bodies, while also unpacking systemic causes of violence. In 2017, Sarah Jordan was recognized by the Office of the Dean of Students as the recipient of the New Professional Staff Member Award and in 2020 was awarded the Allyship in Action Award from the Office of LGBTQI Life. Sarah Jordan serves as the Urgent Care and Trauma Counselor at the University Counseling Center, specifically supporting students impacted by sexual assault and other forms of interpersonal violence.