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Maymester Abroad Course Listings

SUMMER 2018

VANDERBILT IS OFFERING EXCITING MAYMESTER  COURSES ABROAD

Maymesters offer innovative and intensive academic experiences. Maymesters, whether on or off-campus, allow students to explore topics often only available in summer and in ways that go beyond the traditional classroom setting. For many students, participating in Maymester becomes an adventure in learning.

Students interested in applying to one of the following courses must do so before JANUARY 31st, 2018.

All application material, including the personal statement and academic references, must be submitted by January 31st. Professors will accept students on a rolling basis. Additional requirements will apply after acceptance.

Once students have been accepted into a Maymester course, they will confirm their acceptance by signing a virtual “Commitment to Attend” by February 12, 2018. This commitment will appear on the student’s GEO application once she or he has been accepted into the Maymester:

Commitment to Attend 
For students who have been accepted into the Maymester of their choice, we will require a virtual “Commitment to Attend.” By signing this document the accepted student:

  1. Commits to attend the program.
  2. Is permitted to withdraw their commitment to the Maymester, if GEO is notified before Monday, March 13th, 2018.

Students are strongly encouraged to sign this document within 14 days of notification of acceptance, preferably before Feb. 12th. This deadline is necessary in order to accommodate waitlisted students into any vacancies that may occur in the course roster.

Maymester Withdrawal Policy 
By clicking on the "Commit" button, you agree to:

  1. Commit to attend the program.
  2. Acknowledge that you will be required to forfeit a $500 deposit fee* if you withdraw from the program after the specified withdrawal deadline (March 13, 2018).

If you fail to sign this document within 14 days of your notification of acceptance, or by February 12, 2018, your position may be made available to wait listed students.

Note: The deposit fee will be assessed directly to your Student Accounts invoice, and will be billed on or around June 1. The deposit fee applies only to those who withdraw after the specified deadline. Those who withdraw before the deadline will not be assessed the fee.

*   For withdrawals after Monday, March 13th, Vanderbilt reserves the right to bill students for any unrecoverable costs, even if these costs amount to more than the $500 base withdrawal fee.

Why does Vanderbilt University charge a deposit fee? In order to plan our programs effectively, we need an accurate count of participants as early as is possible. Students who back out of a program after having committed may jeopardize both the planning and the pricing of the program. We impose a monetary penalty on those who back out as a way of ensuring that we count only those who are serious about attending.

For questions related to any of the Maymesters listed, please consult the professor for the course. You may also consult with Dr. C. André Christie-Mizell, Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, 350 Buttrick Hall, and with the GEO staff in the Student Life Center for additional information.

Vanderbilt will provide on a competitive basis scholarships to help undergraduate students pay the costs of studying abroad during the summer, including the Maymesters listed below. The Global Summer Fellows Program will provide university stipends that can be used to offset the costs for students enrolling in Vanderbilt-approved, credit­ bearing summer study and Maymester programs. These are competitive awards based on the student's essay, major, letters of reference and are linked to a student's financial need vis-a-vis the Maymester costs.

Summer Study Abroad Financial Aid

Maymester and on-line scholarship applications are available here and additional information can be found at
https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/?go=funding. The application deadline is 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 17, 2018.

Please note: Under-enrolled courses may be cancelled. Students who have applied to such courses will be notified at the earliest opportunity. Students who have financial holds or are on social or academic probation are ineligible for Maymesters. Acceptance into a Maymester is contingent on the instructor's approval, too.

 Apply November 6th!

FYI: THE JANUARY 31st DEADLINE IS ONLY FOR OFF-CAMPUS AND ABROAD MAYMESTERS. ON-LINE COURSE REGISTRATION FOR ON-CAMPUS MAYMESTER AND SUMMER COURSES WILL BE HELD FROM MARCH 26th-MAY 7th.

ANTH 2114: Above and Below the Surface: The Caribbean between Climate Change and Tourism Apply Now
ASIA 1857: Living Languages and Cultures of India Apply Now
ASIA 1680: Inside China: Economy, Society, and Culture in Beijing and Shanghai Apply Now
BSCI 3228:  Corals, Koalas and Cassowaries Great Barrier Reef and Tropics of Australia Apply Now
CLAS 3720: History and Art of Ancient Rome Apply Now
CLAS 3730: The Roman to Medieval Near East: The Caesarea Excavations, Israel Apply Now
ECON 2340: War, plunder and pillage, and other economic conflicts Apply Now
EES 3865: Field Investigations: Brazil Apply Now
EUS 2260 05: Immigration, International Health, Social Justice, & Romantic Poetry from the Swiss Alps to Rome Apply Now
MHS 3310: Comparison of Healthcare Systems: USA – France – Italy Apply Now
RUSS 2210: Russia Today: Political, Socio-Economic, and Cultural Change Apply Now
SPAN 3325: The Way of Saint James – Santiago, Spain Apply Now
SPAN 3330: Cultural Studies in the Andes (Cuzco, Machu Picchu and Lima, Peru) Apply Now
SPAN 3302: Spanish for Oral communications through Cultural Topics Apply Now
THTR 3282: Theatre and Performance in the U.K. Apply Now

 


ASIAN STUDIES 1680: NSIDE CHINA: ECONOMY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN BEIJING AND SHANGHAI  

May 6th - May 30th , 2018

asia

INSTRUCTOR: Xianmin Liu, Ph.D, Principal Senior Lecturer of Asian Studies Program

China has one of the longest cultural histories on earth, yet it is one of the world’s most dynamic countries. In the past three decades, China has undergone unprecedented economic growth, has lifted 660 million Chinese people out of poverty, and has become the world's second largest economy next to the US. What is China like behind all the hype and the headlines? This course is designed to provide students with immediate, first-hand knowledge of China economically, culturally, socially and politically. Students will experience total social-cultural immersion through formal classroom instruction, numerous excursions and field trips to famous ancient monuments and modern wonders, international and domestic businesses, institutions, museums, private homes, and interaction with local people from different walks of life in Beijing and Shanghai. Upon completion of this course, students will earn three credits in International Culture for AXLE. The course is open to all majors and no background in Chinese language is required.   

Beijing

The curriculum in Beijing consists of the following three components:

1)    Seminar & issue discussion
Students will attend seminars (in English) given by top-notch distinguished guest speakers from such reputable institutions as Columbia University, Citi Bank, Peking University, on diverse topics including China’s financial technology and AI, China’s Belt and Road ambition, China’s role in climate change, US-China relations, traditional Chinese thoughts, etc.

2)    Field trips & interviews

Field trips will be arranged for students to visit a range of well-known historical and cultural riches, such as the Great Wall, Temple of Heaven, Summer Palace, Tibetan Lama Temple, Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, China’s National Museum, Military Museum of China, Mao’s Memorial Hall, and many other places of ancient and contemporary significance. Students will have opportunities to visit a traditional Chinese treatment center (experiencing hot-cupping and other traditional remedies), a community center, and a rural village. In addition, students will gain “up close and personal” insights into Chinese life by visiting private homes, and interviewing business owners, Chinese doctors, college students, senior citizens, and Kung fu masters.

3) Chinese language/culture classes

The program provides an array of Chinese language and culture classes, from survival Chinese (such as counting, shopping and ordering foods), to Chinese cooking, art, music, and martial arts.

Shanghai

For the last week, the program will travel to Shanghai by high speed rail to see China’s financial and commercial capital and one of the most phenomenal cities in the world. Activities in Shanghai include attending seminars on subjects such as the rise and globalization of Shanghai, and the One Belt One Road Project (OBOR), China’s ambitious foreign economic development initiative.  Field trips will include visits to the Bund (the well-known riverfront in Shanghai), Pudong (China's financial and commercial hub), and the City God Market (a famous bazaar). Students will also pay a visit to joint ventures such as Shanghai General Motors and Honeywell-China, and an American entrepreneur’s solar panel company (founded by Vanderbilt alumni). A maglev train ride, a night cruise to view Shanghai’s skyline, and a panoramic view of the city from the top of Shanghai Tower (the 2nd-tallest skyscraper in the world) will allow students to experience the cutting-edge technology and modern wonders created in China in the past three decades.

Final presentation/paper

Based on the integration of what was learned during the entire program and observations from these three weeks in China, the student is expected to give an oral presentation of 7-8 minutes that reflects their own insight into Chinese society, and to submit a five-page paper with substantial concrete details of their reflections at the end of the program. The paper is due by 12am June 5th EST)

Daily Journal Writing

Students are required to keep a daily journal containing their experiences, thoughts, and reflections during the entire program, and submit it at the end of the program together with the final paper. (Refer to the Journal Requirements for specifics)

Attendance & Participation

Attendance of every single class, group activity and trip, and active participation in class are required.  In case of medical emergency, the student must notify the instructor immediately.

Program Policy

Students are not permitted to stay overnight off campus throughout the program. Failure to comply with the rule will result in the assignment of an F grade.


Course Assessment

Attendance (including being on time for all the classes & field trips)  20%

Class discussion & participation                                                                     15%

Daily journal (must be up-to-date)                                                                   20%                            

Final Presentation                                                                                           20%                

Final Paper (end of the program)                                                                    25%

FEES: Cost per student is $10,250.  Included: all field trips, cultural visits, and classes/seminars, guest lectures, classes, performances, local transportation, high-speed rail from Beijing to Shanghai, maglev train ride, river cruise, housing/hotel for over 3 weeks in Beijing and Shanghai, HTH International Health Insurance, and most meals. (Students will have a meal plan). Not included: airfare (international & national), incidentals, some meals, and personal travel and expenses.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

Highlights

Itinerary

Video

DATES: May 6th – May 30th
Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

ELIGIBILITY: No Prerequisites. No requirement of Chinese language. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. Student should be in good health upon committing to the program.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours.  AS 1680 counts as an INT credit toward AXLE. 

MORE INFORMATION:  xianmin.liu@vanderbilt.edu; 615-343-7824/615-438-4068


BSCI 3228: Corals, Koalas and Cassowaries Great Barrier Reef and Tropics of Australia

 BSCI

PROFESSOR: Dr. Amanda Benson, Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences

Explore the most diverse ecosystems in the world: the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and Tropical Rain forests, first hand -hiking and swimming through these precious ecosystems. Australia is considered a megadiverse country. It is home to a huge variety of unique organisms: 83% of its mammals, 99% of its’ birds and 92% of its plants occur no other place in the world. The course will start off at Vanderbilt for two weeks, studying the research being conducted on biodiversity of Australia: its origin, the threats, and its conservation. Then we will go Down Under, where you will spend half your time in the lush ancient rainforest and the other half on the different islands of the Great Barrier Reef. Experiencing the wonders of these ecosystems first hand and learning about the research efforts to understand the biodiversity and its threats will heighten your awareness of the fragility of our world.  You will be snorkeling, hiking, canoeing, Kuku Yalanji Dreamtime walking, canopy surfing, swimming with turtles and flying from islands to island all to uncover the the wonders of the world down under. 

Gain a greater understanding of the diversity, complexity and fragility of life on our planet.

Master substantial knowledge of the basic concepts of biodiversity, threats to biodiversity and conservation of populations and species.

  • Gain a familiarity with the recent scientific research in conservation biology.
  • Gain the ability to critically interpret, discuss and present scientific data and concepts.
  • Gain an appreciation of the biodiversity of our world and how dramatically we have and are changing our planet.

ELIGIBILITY/COURSE REQUIREMENTS: This course has NO prerequisites.

FEES: Cost per student is approx. $12,350.  Included: Included: tuition, entrance fees, lodging, some meals, GeoBlue International Health Insurance. Not included: airfare (international & national), lodging during sessions at Vanderbilt, incidentals, some meals, and personal travel and expenses.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare.

DATES: Approximately May 7th to May 22 at Vanderbilt; May 23th to Jun 6th in Australia  **Please note:  Program fee does not include housing for the on campus segment of this course.

TENTATIVE PROGRAM SCHEDULE: Course Guide ; Itinerary

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

SYLLABUS: contact professor

CREDITS:  3 credits: MNS in Axle 

MORE INFORMATION: dr.benson@vanderbilt.edu


ECON 2340:   WAR, PLUNDER AND PILLAGE, AND OTHER ECONOMIC CONFLICTS

ECON

INSTRUCTOR: Robert Driskill, Professor of Economics

Course description:  Why would individual soldiers be willing to risk what surely is most important to them--their lives--as they storm a beach at Normandy, or attack a fortified castle, or cross "no-man's land" in WWI? Why would eighteenth-century soldiers allow themselves to be dressed in bright red--like the uniforms we can see today such on the well-known guards at Buckingham Palace? Surely it made them an easy target for the enemy.  Why have some countries engaged in pillaging and plundering richer countries, while others have not, instead investing in castles and other defenses? Economics provides a framework for addressing these questions, questions that appear far removed from the ones usually analyzed in economics classes. These are all questions about the allocation (or misallocation) of scarce resources, and are part of the purview of Economics. But these are not the usual questions addressed in undergraduate economics classes. There, the topics mostly are about the allocation of scarce resources when property rights are well-defined and protected. This is the way of making a living by production and exchange. But much economic activity concerns a different way of making a living-pillaging and plundering and appropriating by force the goods of others. This way of making a living is the subject matter of this course.

We will study the sources of negotiation failures that lead to war, the economics of how a “principal,” e.g., a General, gets his “agents,” e.g., a soldier, to do his bidding, the economics of castles, the economics of strategic bombing, and perhaps the economics of financial conflicts.  As depicted in the above pictures, we reinforce these topics with a three-day trip to the Normandy Invasion Beaches in France, where we indeed “storm the beach” and look down the cliffs climbed by U.S. Rangers. Back in London, we visit the Imperial War Museum, the Tower of London, Parliament, Churchill’s war rooms, St. Paul’s Cathedral, the British Museum, and perhaps a large international bank.  We also attend a theater production (last year we saw Romeo and Juliet, but our options each year depend on “what’s on.”)

FEES: Cost per student is approx. $11,950Fees include tuition, accommodation at the Foundation for International Education in central London, and the costs of excursions and GeoBlue health insurance. Fees do not include airfare, regular meals and incidental expenses.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES: May 10th to June 2nd (2018), with trip to Normandy, France May 24-26.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Details to follow

ELIGIBILITY: Students should have taken Econ 100 and 101 or have the consent of the instructor. We will average four hours a weekday of class work, about one-third of which will be activities and excursions. This should leave at least one long weekend for travel and exploration on one's own. Grades will be based on a journal kept by each student, class participation, and an exam. The textbook is Principles of Conflict Economics by Charles H. Anderton and John. R. Carter. Cambridge University Press; ISBN 978-0-521-69865-8, 2009 (paperback) and Castles, Battles, and Bombs: How Economics Explains Military History by Jurgen Brauer and Hubert van Tuyll; University of Chicago Press; ISBN 978-0-226-07163-3, 2008. 3 credits

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. (SBS AXLE credit)

MORE INFORMATION: Contact Robert.driskill@vanderbilt.edu  


  EES 3865:  Field Investigations: Volcanoes, Cave Geology, Geomorphology, and Conservation in Brazil

Instructor: Guilherme Gualda, Associate Professor in Earth and Environmental Sciences

Scope: 

In this course, we will study Earth and Environmental processes and systems in the field, with an emphasis on field methods. In 2018, the course will be held in Brazil, which will give us the opportunity to study a variety of topics in the Earth and Environmental Sciences, including past volcanic activity, surface geomorphology, cave geology, and human dimensions of conservation, while traveling through various ecosystems of the Brazilian Atlantic forest.

Motivation and Goals: 

Rocks preserve the most extensive record of the evolution of the planet, from which we are able to retrace Earth’s history over 4.5 billion years. Field geology plays a particularly important role in decoding this complex record, but its interpretation requires proper understanding of geologic processes and of the methods of field geology. In this course, we will learn the methods of field geology and will apply them to understand geologic processes related to the assembly of a supercontinent and ultimately to the breakup of South America and Africa caused by the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean some 130 million years ago. 

During the course, we will study volcanic supereruptions and their deposits, cave geology and associated underground water systems, and landform evolution since the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

Much of the area we will study is covered by the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest, which encompasses more than 50,000 species of animals and plants, a biodiversity similar to that of the Amazon. It is also highly threatened, as almost 90% of its area has been converted into crops and cities. We will travel through some of the most pristine portions of the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil, and we will discuss some of the challenges associated with conservation of these areas.

Part of the fieldwork performed during the course will directly contribute to active research projects focusing on the evolution of supereruption-forming magma bodies being pursued by Gualda and graduate students.

Program: The course will start in Florianópolis on May 7 and finish in São Paulo on June 1, 2018. Our itinerary will take us to a few different areas in southern Brazil over the length of the course, and the topical focus will change accordingly: 

1. FAROL DE SANTA MARTA (Santa Catarina State):

a. Introduction to geology: rock types, plate tectonics, magmatism, sedimentation

b. Introduction to field methods

2. SERRA GERAL (Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul States):

a. Evolution of the environment over time: from oceans to deserts to volcanic landscapes

b. Volcanism leading to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean: styles of volcanism, evolution of magma bodies at depth, magma eruption processes

c. Field research of supereruption deposits, in connection with project by Gualda’s group on the evolution of magma bodies that lead to supereruptions

d. Araucária Forests of the Highlands in Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul states

 3. FLORIANÓPOLIS (Santa Catarina State):

a. Free days mid-course at an island city with beautiful beaches and plenty of activities

 4. BLUMENAU and CURITIBA (Santa Catarina and Paraná States):

a. Construction of a continent: assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent

b. Forests along the steep Serra do Mar escarpment in Paraná state

 5. ALTO RIBEIRA CAVE DISTRICT (São Paulo State):

a. Evolution of karstic landscapes, cave development, and subterranean water systems

b. Highland Rain forests in São Paulo state

c. Human dimensions of conservation, including the history of establishment of a state park and impact on local communities

Evaluation

Course evaluation will be based on participation, field exercises (outcrop descriptions, geologic cross-sections and maps), and oral presentations.

Requisites

Students with all levels of expertise in Earth and environmental sciences are encouraged to apply. Activities will be adjusted to take into account prior experience and course-work.

FEES: Cost per student is approx. 9,350. 

Included: The course fee includes tuition, lodging, transportation, most meals (depending on the location), GeoBlue International Health Insurance, and entrance fees to National and State Parks.

Not Included: Airfare from Nashville to Florianópolis or from São Paulo to Nashville, a Brazilian tourist visa, transportation from and to airports, regular meals in major cities, and incidental expenses.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must  commit   by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES: May 7 th  to June 1st  

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. More details to follow

CREDITS:  credit hours. This course is listed as MNS in AXLE.

MORE INFORMATION: Guil Gualda g.gualda@vanderbilt.edu (website


EUS 2260: MIGRATION, INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, SOCIAL JUSTICE, AND ROMANTIC POETRY FROM THE SWISS ALPS TO ROME

  EUS

INSTRUCTOR:  Professor Robert Barsky, College of Arts and Sciences; Law School

Despite (or perhaps because of) the conservatism of the Swiss and the image of Switzerland as a place of political neutrality, banking and watch-making, the Swiss Alps have sheltered and inspired generations of radical creative and political work, by a host of artists, Romantic poets (Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron), anarchists (Bakunin, Kropotkin and the Jura Federation), and, in Ascona, an incredible group of visiting artists and writers (Mary Wigman, Rudolph Laban, Hermann Hesse, D.H. Lawrence, Isadora Duncan, Carl Jung, Max Weber). One reason for this is that the conservative Switzerland is tightly-guarded, and ruled in accordance with international legal instruments and laws that have made it a safe haven for persecuted persons, and a fertile ground for international organizations charged with upholding human rights. Another reason is the sheer grandeur and impenetrability of the high Alps has led to the establishment of specific kinds of political regimes that have been largely protected by repeated incursions and allowed for a certain protective neutrality.

In this Maymester, Professor Robert Barsky will make this link between radicalism and creativity, safe haven and international law, medicine and international engagement, by exploring institutes, specialists and natural settings in the Swiss Alps and then in Rome, Italy. Beginning in Geneva, the students will be introduced to the international legal and non-governmental organizations that uphold international laws, notably the Red Cross, the World Health Organization, the International Organization for Migration, the United Nations, UNICEF, the International Labor Organization, the World Trade Organization, Doctors Without Borders, and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees. Students will meet with high-ranking officials from those organizations, and witness firsthand the kinds of work that is directed from the Geneva offices. 

 We will then travel to Chamonix, in the footsteps of Mary Wollstonecraft and her creation, Frankenstein’s monster, and we’ll also follow Percy Shelley and Byron up the Aiguille de Midi and to the Mer de Glace, enjoying Romantic inspiration throughout that amazing valley. We will then head to Grindewald and Murren, to explore the sublime heights that have inspired so many artists, writers, painters and philosophers including Dorothy and William Wordsworth, Lord Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley, John Turner, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Friedrich Nietzche and others. We will complete our work in Rome by returning to refugee and migration studies, and we’ll be introduced to the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center, the International Organization for Migration Rome office, the Migration, Asylum and Social Integration Center, and other migration organizations in the country that is at the flashpoint of the current crises.

 EUS

FEES:  Cost per student is approx. $13,400.   Fees include  tuition, accommodation, most breakfasts, and public transportation between sites, some cultural activities and GeoBlue health insurance. 

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit   by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

APPROXIMATE DATES: May 8-16, Geneva; May 16-20, Chamonix; May 20-24, Mürren; May 24-May 30, Rome

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course.

ELIGIBILITY: NO PREREQUISITES. The program is open to all students in good academic standing, and with consent of instructor AXLE: INT

CREDITS: 3 HOURS.  This course is listed as INTERNATIONAL credit in AXLE.

MORE INFORMATION: robert.barsky@Vanderbilt.Edu

Website: https://my.vanderbilt.edu/robertbarsky/maymester-in-the-alps

Film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMO19e_eO84


 MHS 3310:  Comparative Study of Healthcare Systems

Paris, France and Ferrara, Italy

Myths and Realities about Healthcare Systems in the World

MHS

MAYMESTER 2018 (May 7- June 2).

  • MEDICINE HEALTH AND SOCIETY
  • Comparison of Healthcare Systems
  • No previous study of French required.
  • Three credits
  • AXLE credit (INT)
  • Possible credit in French (elective)

Course Description

Health care experts for the World Health Organization did a statistical ranking of the world's health care systems. They studied 191 countries and ranked them on criteria such as the longevity of people, infant mortality rate, number of hospital beds per 1000 population and relative per capita cost of healthcare. The French and the Italian universal health-care systems were ranked very highly due to high attainment scores in all the dimensions considered, namely health of the population, equity of finance and sensitivity to patients’ expectations (WHO). These attainments were achieved with expenditure levels that were significantly lower than in many other affluent countries. The American healthcare system, however, was ranked number 37.

Objectives:

  • Analyze the different types of healthcare systems provided in industrialized democracies and compare them to the American one.
  • Get a complete understanding of the different healthcare systems models with an emphasis on France, Italy and the US.
  • Study the history of the French, the Italian and the American Healthcare Systems.
  • Understand the “Affordable Healthcare Act”
  • Formulate a prognosis of what the Trump Health Care System would change in the US.
  • Analyze how France and Italy achieved universal healthcare.
  • Have a comprehensive and culturally specific understanding of the French and Italian Universal Healthcare Systems.
  • Get a clear understanding of the different types of efficient healthcare systems in industrialized democracies around the world.
  • Explore the following questions regarding healthcare systems:
  1. What is the role of the government?
  2. Who is covered and how is insurance financed? What exactly is covered?
  3. How is the delivery system organized and financed?
  4. What are the major strategies to ensure quality of care?
  5. What is being done to reduce disparities?
  6. What is being done to promote delivery system integration and care coordination?
  7. What is the status of electronic health records?
  8. How are costs contained?
  9. What major innovations and reforms have been introduced?

Special academic events and visits:

  • Guest lectures from and conversation with health professionals including health policy professionals, medical doctors, dentists and nurses in the United States and in France.
  • Guided visit to the Marie Curie Museum in Paris, France.
  • Guided visit of Saint-Louis Hospital’s Dermatology History Museum in Paris, France.
  • Guided visit of the Museum of the History of Medicine at the Université de Paris.
  • Guided visit of the Museum of Military Medicine at Val de Grace Hospital
  • Guided visit of the INSERM (National Institute of Health and Medical Research) with possibility of future internship.
  • Guided tour of the French Red Cross in Aix-en-Provence, France.
  • Meeting with health professionals at Aix-en-Provence Rambaut Clinique
  • Meeting with health professionals at Hopital La Timone in Marseille, France.
  • Service activity at a local NGO: NGO focused on the integration of people with special needs in the community Terra
  • VivaBio Ferrara: A visit to an inner city organic farm for pizza making
  • Visit to a private healthcare facility: Quisisana or Clinica Futura
  • Visit to a public hospital: Ospedale Sant' Anna in Cona

Non-academic visits:

  • Segway tour of Paris
  • Guided visit of Versailles Castle
  • Dinner cruise on the Seine River in Paris
  • Sailing tour on Mediterranean in Southern France
  • Horseback riding day tour in Camargue, large UNESCO designated biosphere reserve famous for its Provencal Cowboys, its pink flamingos, white horses and free ranging bulls.
  • Day trip to Venice: Includes roundtrip train transportation, a guided walking tour including Palazzo Ducale and San Marco Basilica, and one (1) museum visit.

Readings:

G. France, F. Taroni, A. Donatini, “The Italian Health-Care System,” Health Economics, Sept. 2005 14(Supp1):S187–202.

Reid T.R., The Healing of America, A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, And Fairer Healthcare,Penguin Books, 2010.

Series of different articles related to the topic such as the following:

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/310799/Voluntary-health-insurance-Europe-country-experience.pdf?ua=1

https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/dutton.pdf

FEES: Cost per student is approx. $11,100.  Fees include: tuition, hotels with buffet breakfast each day, Metro pass in Paris, and TGV from Paris to Aix, some meals, and entrance fees to all museums and parks and GeoBlue International Health Insurance. Fees do not include: round-trip airfare to and from Paris, extra-curricular activities, baggage insurance, Housing on Vanderbilt campus and some meals. A common itinerary will be developed for each student to facilitate group travel

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES:  May 7 th  – June 2nd, 2018   

Location of the course:

  • May 7-9 in Nashville (in class on campus)
  • May 10-18 in Paris, France
  • May 18- 26 in Aix, France
  • May 26-June 2 in Ferrara, Italy

 ** Please note: Program fee does not cover on-campus housing

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Details to follow.

SYLLABUS:  Syllabus 2018 MHS 3310

SEE VIDEO HERE

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. AXLE credit INT

MORE INFORMATION:  nathalie.d.porter@Vanderbilt.Edu


RUSS 2210:  RUSSIA TODAY: POLITICAL, SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHANGE

Experience Russian hospitality and post-Soviet political, socio-economic and cultural change from the inside out

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INSTRUCTOR David Johnson, Lecturer in Russian

Vodka, bears, long winters, The Cold War, Putin as dictator…Break through these and other stereotypes!

Who is Putin, really? Is Russia still a superpower? Why is Russia doing that? Should we fear Russia? Are Russians more Asian or European? What do Russians think? Find answers to these questions and more!

Spend four weeks in the ancient provincial city of Vladimir – one of Russia's first capital cities and political- economic powerhouses – studying, serving, exploring, interacting with Russians from many different social groups, including Russian university students, and reflecting about your knowledge and perceptions of contemporary Russia.

“...any expectations I could possibly have had were surpassed. ...I participated in a culture without being a tourist...and spent [time] outside of my carefully constructed comfort zone. The experience was nothing short of changing my worldview.”

“Visiting Russia has been one of the most life-changing experiences I have ever had. It taught me how little I really know about the world, how different somewhere can be from the USA. It also showed me that we as people, no matter where we live or what country we were born in, are more alike than we tend to let ourselves believe.”

STUDYING

Daily presentations, lectures and excursions focus on aspects of economics, political science, international relations, education, culture, history, sociology, law, religious studies, etc.  Every effort is made to include something relevant to each participant's area of interest.

SERVING

To experience first-hand how history and current economic, political, sociol, educational, legal, and cultural developments intersect and impact specific groups in Russian society we work in several community organizations, possibly including the Vladimir Handicapped Children's Association, a local preschool, a non-profit organization working with adult orphans, a local veterans’ home, the Russian Orthodox Church, a dog shelter being organized and built by three local retired women.

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EXPLORING

The schedule includes:

  • Home stays (including home-cooked breakfasts and dinners)
  • Conversations, dinners, and fun evenings with Russians from different social groups, including university students
  • Excursions to UNESCO World Heritage Sites and other fascinating places
  • Trips to Moscow, St. Petersburg (during the famous “White Nights”), Suzdal, Bogoliubovo, Murom, the rural village Schukhudrino
  • Weekend at a dacha (summer home) with a Russian banya
  • Concerts, ballet in St. Petersburg, and a soccer match
  • Train, boat, bus, and bike rides 

REFLECTING

While in Russia, each participant considers the guiding questions for the program: What is the current situation in Russia in general and in terms of my area of interest and specialization? How does my understanding of the current situation in Russia coincide and differ with what I am learning, hearing, seeing, and feeling in Russia?

FEES: Cost per student is approx. $9,700.  Fees include tuition, hotels, some meals, and entrance fees to all museums, parks, and GeoBlue International Health Insurance. Fees do not include: round-trip airfare, extra-curricular activities, some meals, baggage insurance and Russian Visa.  A common itinerary will be developed for each student to facilitate group travel.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit   by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES: May 14 th  – June 15 th , 2018

ITINERARY: Maymester in Russia 2018 Daily Schedule: SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS HERE

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. No knowledge of Russian is required.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. INT in AXLE.

MORE INFORMATION: Faculty Director, David Johnson  david.matthew.johnson@vanderbilt.edu

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND CONTACTS

Blog posts from previous years:

 http://considerablycaffeinated.blogspot.com/

 http://visitingmotherrussia.blogspot.com/

 https://nicholshumanitarianfundblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/03/leah-fassinger/

Photos:

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanHome/photos/a.414289011289.194837.184076861289/10153479611591290/?type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152424612366622.1073741839.585521621&type=1&l=21c280aeca

Russian Television Reports:

http://vladtv.ru/society/78658/

http://variant33.ru/ekspressnovosti1/22590_prikosnulis_k_nacional_nym_tradiciyam/

Comments about Host Organization (The American Home in Vladimir, Russia)


Spanish 3330: Cultural Studies in the Andes (Cuzco, Machu Picchu and Lima)

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May 9-June 1, 2018

As a cultural crossroad, UNESCO World Heritage Site, and cosmopolitan city, Cuzco has something for everyone. Make it your own during this Maymester and explore one of the most fascinating tourist destinations in the world: Cuzco, Peru .

In this course students will explore different forms of cultural production in the Hispanic world, with a focus on the Andean region and a strong emphasis on hands-on learning. Some of the issues discussed will be the lessons of cultural anthropology and archaeology to explore the past and understand the present, popular and elite artistic production, the importance of festive culture in the region, as well as questions of gender and society. As part of the Maymester, program participants will attend and study the festival of Corpus Christi, one of the most fascinating syncretic celebrations in the Spanish-speaking world. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to engage in a more experiential type of tourism that will include activities such as hiking through ancient ruins, participating in various celebrations, and visiting with traditional artisans. Students will lodge and study in the historic center of Cuzco, thus encouraging constant interaction and exploration of all the former Inca capital has to offer. The group will spend the first few days in Lima, a major cosmopolitan city and culinary capital of the Americas. 

Students will receive credit for Span 3330: Cultural Studies in the Andes (Major: Culture/Elective; AXLE: INT; Prerequisite: Span 3301W and Span 3302.) Formal classes (taught in Spanish) will meet during the week and weekends will be dedicated to guided trips to Machu Picchu, the Sacred Valley of the Incas and Lima, among others. 

Course requirements: Spanish 3301W and Spanish 3302. Also, students should be physically fit, as they will be expected to engage in hikes and walks at high altitude (around 12000 ft.)

Fees: Cost per student is $8,950 for 14 or fewer students; $8,850 for 15 or more students. Fees include tuition, class materials, lodging, at least one meal a day, entrance fees to all sites, as well as trips outside of Cuzco and Lima. Program fees will also include participation in unlimited group classes where students can mingle with locals and program participants alike. Past group classes included tango and salsa dancing, yoga, capoeira, public speaking, cooking and whitewater rafting (categories 2 and 3.) Fees do not include airfare into Lima (May 9), Lima-Cuzco (May 16) or returning to the US from Cuzco (June 1.) Spending money will depend on personal habits but last year's students spent a few hundred dollars on average. 

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must commit by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster. We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

Itinerary and travel arrangements for the group: Details to follow.

May 9:           Arrival in Lima

May 16:        Lima-Cuzco

June 1:          Return to the US from Cuzco

Credits: 3 credit hours. This course is listed as INT for AXLE credit.

Andean Studies Scholarship: There will be a maximum of two scholarships available to students participating in this Maymester. The amount is approximately $300, payable in local currency during the first week of classes. The application process consists of an interview and the submission of a 2-page statement (in Spanish) explaining the importance of this trip to Peru in the context of your own background, academic, and career goals. Please send all application materials and direct all questions to Prof. Heraldo Falconi (h.falconi@vanderbilt.edu.) The application deadline is February 15, 2018 and a final decision is expected by March 14.  Also, some financial support based on need and merit may be available through a Pugh-Hernández Award.

More information: Contact Heraldo Falconi (h.falconi@vanderbilt.edu). Also, see last year’s class blog at: http://vandyincuzco.blogspot.com/.


SPANISH 3325: The Way of Saint James

span
 INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Maria Paz
Pintané , Senior Lecturer in Spanish

Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela has deeply influenced the spiritual and physical landscapes of Spain and has remained until today as a major heritage site. For this reason, this course explores, from a multidisciplinary point of view, the origins, development, and influence of The Way of Saint James in the life, and culture of Spain. Through a close examination of literature, art, history, cultural, and religious issues, we will learn how the cult of Saint James and The Way itself has contributed to shape Spanish national identity.

The program will take place in Spain during four weeks and it will include a walking trip along several sections of the medieval French Way, specifically from Roncesvalles to Santo Domingo de la Calzada and from Ponferrada to Santiago de Compostela. Additionally, students will visit several major Spanish cities relevant to the history of the Way (Pamplona, Logroño, Burgos, Leon, and Santiago) and Madrid. Thus, students will walk through four of the autonomous communities that configure the map of Spain and experience first-hand the commonalities and differences among them.

During the course, the Way will be the classroom where students will learn about the socio-historical, geographical, religious, and cultural significance of this medieval tradition. Also, they will attend talks in cathedrals, monasteries, convents, castles, ancient pilgrim’s hospitals, and museums. As part of the course, students will write in Spanish an individual diary where they reflect about the mandatory readings and their own personal experience walking The Way. In addition, students will work on two group projects.

What is "El camino de Santiago"? 
The "Camino de Santiago" is a pilgrimage journey to Santiago de Compostela, but also a unique road network that converges in the Galician city of Santiago de Compostela. According to the legend, the Apostle St. James’ remains were carried by boat from Jerusalem to northern Spain where they were buried on the site where nowadays sits the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. When the tomb was discovered, it started a stream of travelers making the pilgrimage to the site (the earliest records of visits date from the 8th century). Today, thousands of Christian and non-Christian pilgrims set out from their homes on their way to Santiago. Many of them for religious and spiritual reasons, but many others do it to enjoy a unique experience, which is the result of 12 centuries of existence. The Way of St. James has given rise to an extraordinary spiritual, cultural, and social life. For this reason, the main routes were declared the First European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe, and a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO.

FEES:  Cost per student approx. $8,750.   Included:  Two-day visit to Madrid, one-day visit to Pamplona, two-day visit to Burgos, one-day visit to León, one-day visit to Ponferrada, two-day visit to Santiago. Transportation within Spain, housing/hotel for the whole trip, two meal plan (breakfast & dinner), GeoBlue International Health Insurance, cultural visits (Madrid, Burgos, Leon, Astorga, Santiago & A Coruña), and classes. 

Not included: airfare & lunch.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must  commit   by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES:  May 7 th  –June 3rd, 2018

ITINERARY:  The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Details to follow.

ELIGIBILITY: Prerequisite: Span 3302. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. Student should be in good physical condition.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. HCA credit in AXLE

SYLLABUS: 

MORE INFORMATION:   VISIT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE TO SEE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM PREVIOUS COURSES: 
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vanderbilt-University-en-El-camino-de-Santiago/263978263648112?ref=hl

WATCH THIS SHORT VIDEO TO GET AN IDEA OF THE PLACES YOU WILL BE VISITING:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJr2FzPnn1A

E-mail: maria.p.pintane@vanderbilt.edu


SPANISH 3302: SPANISH FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION THROUGH CULTURAL TOPICS (Alicante, Madrid, Toledo, Granada)

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INSTRUCTOR:  José Luis Aznar, Senior Lecturer in Spanish

This Maymester course is taught in Alicante, Spain. This gorgeous coastal city is the capital city of the beautiful Costa Blanca, located on the eastern coast of Spain. Few other cities can boast exciting and famous festivals, miles of beautiful sunny beaches, quaint, old- world Spanish boroughs, and a richness of early architecture. As a native of Spain, I cannot imagine a better and more exciting place to host this intermediate conversational Spanish course. In addition to the city of Alicante, students will visit the cities of Madrid, Granada, and Toledo (included in the program), and will have the option to visit Valencia as an optional side trip.

The objective of this course is to increase your level of oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of cultural, political and historical events in an immersion environment through living, speaking and studying solely in Spanish for four weeks. Students will be actively engaged in communicative activities designed and structured to maximize their use of the target languages

These hands-on projects include research, analysis, discussion, argumentation, and presentation of historic, social and political events that impact Spain in the 21st century. Through interviews of residents of Alicante, in addition to assessing journalistic sources, documentaries, and films, students will prepare their weekly presentations. By the end of this course, students will improve their oral proficiency, gain strategies for effective oral communication in Spanish and have a deeper knowledge and understanding of Spanish history and culture.

Alicante, Spain: Home Base of the Program

Alicante, the capital city of beautiful Costa Blanca, is located on the eastern coast of Spain. Famous for its festivals, miles of sunny beaches, quaint old Spanish barrios, Mediterranean cuisine, architecture Alicante is considered one of the gems of the Mediterranean. For more information about the program visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MaymesterAlicante

FEES: Cost is approx. $8,900.   Included: Course tuition, Visits to the cities of Madrid, Toledo, and Granada with entrance fees to sites and museums. Transportation from Madrid to Alicante and Granada. Hotel room for 4 weeks. Two meal/day plan during weekdays in various restaurants. GeoBlue International Health Insurance. A Spanish cell phone (one per two students). 

Not included: airfare, optional side trip to Valencia and Barcelona, possible activities (Dance, sailing and cooking classes), and meal plan on weekends.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Accepted Students must  commit   by February 12th in the GEO application - Studio Abroad to retain their place on the course roster.  We anticipate a wait list of students wishing to join this course, thus the importance of committing as soon as you are accepted. This course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 14 qualified students by the end of January 2018.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Information on scholarships administered by the Global Education Office.

DATES:  May 7 th  to June 1st, 2018

ITINERARY: 2018 Itinerary

SYLLABUS:  2018 Syllabus SPAN 3302

ELIGIBILITY:  Prerequisite: Span 3301W. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. This course is listed as INT for AXLE credit.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: jose.aznar@vanderbilt.edu