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Students on the Market

The Ph.D. candidates on the job market for the 2021-2022 year are:

Marva Goodson-Millermarva goodson

  • marva.v.goodson@vanderbilt.edu
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • marvagoodson.com
  • Current Position: Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Vanderbilt University Department of Political Science
  • Fields of Study: Crime and Deviance, Social Stratification and Social Networks
  • Bio: Marva Goodson is a postdoctoral research scholar at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Political Science's Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions. Her work aims to understand the causes and consequences of crime-involved women's egocentric (or personal) social network configurations. Criminological theories have long emphasized the important connection between social relationships and deviance. However, the operationalization of social relationships has remained consistent over the last several decades, with a focus on quality of key social ties (i.e., parents, peers, and partners). Marva's work utilizes novel social network methods to provide a more concise assessment of individuals' social environments, including structural and compositional network characteristics and information about nonintimate (e.g., coworkers) and estranged ties. Findings from her research demonstrates that nonintimate ties who are rarely activated for social support provide access to critical social capital (i.e., legal advice and employment opportunities) and estranged ties – who often use illegal substance and do not provide access to resources – may pose an important social threat to women's reintegration. Broadly, her work informs how social capital research could be integrated into criminological theory, practice, and policy to provide more equitable opportunities for under-resourced and historically marginalized groups to successfully navigate correctional supervision requirements.

 

Dylan Ironscastorena

  • dylan.irons@vanderbilt.edu
  • Fields of Study: International Relations, Political Methodology, North Korean Politics, Modern Korean History, International Political Economy, Politics of Refugees
  • Bio: Dylan Irons is a Ph.D. Candidate at Vanderbilt University. He researches how the weaponization of economic policy by governments to punish their political opponents and reward their base of supporters affects forced migration. Specifically, he examines the methods state actors employ to inhibit participation in the formal economy such as restrictions on employment, denial of access to health care and education, and prohibitions on farming, fishing, and other agricultural activities. He is interested in how these practices affect forced migration in countries such as North Korea, Zimbabwe, Venezuela, and other states who engage in such tactics as a means of maintaining control. By re-conceptualizing the poverty-refugee nexus as a function of economic expectations resulting from state practices as opposed to a function of income, he demonstates that poverty can act as a coercive mechanism for flight above and beyond threats to physical integrity. Outside of forced migration and refugee issues, Dylan's research interests include North Korean Politics, Modern Korean History, and International Political Economy. He has previously taught undergraduate courses at Belmont University in International Business, Microeconomics, and North Korean Politics – the latter of which he designed himself.
  • Advisor: Jenn Larson

 

Marzia Ocenooceno

  • marzia.oceno@vanderbilt.edu
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • www.marziaoceno.com
  • Current Position: Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Vanderbilt University's Department of Political Science
  • Major Fields of Study: American Politics and Political Methodology
  • Bio: Marzia Oceno is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Vanderbilt's Center for the Study of Democracti Institutions. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science in 2020 from the University of Michigan, where she specialized in American Politics and Political Methodology. She is interested in developing original surveys and experimential designs to better understand the complexities of gender and racial identities and attitudes as they relate to public opinion and political behavior in the United States. Her dissertation and resulting book project she light on underappreciated heterogeneity in both women's and men's candidate evaluations, voting preferences, and policy attitudes by analyzing gender at the subgroup level. Specifically, she proposes a novel theory about how feminism and non-feminism divide the U.S. electorate and show that these subgroup identites powerfully drive candidate support while distorting the link between descriptive and substantive representation. Her publications and other ongoing research projects focus on how group identities and attitudes influence the public's perception and evaluation of political campaigns and candidates, electoral outcomes, various forms of participation, and health behaviors.

 

Daniela Osorio MichelOsorio

  • daniela.osorio.michel@vanderbilt.edu
  • Website link: www.danielaosoriomichel.com
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Fields of Study: Comparative Politics, Methods
  • Bio:

    Daniela Osorio Michel is a Ph.D. candidate at Vanderbilt University. Her research focuses on questions of identity, public opinion, representation, and democracy. Her dissertation considers barriers women politicians face to achieve office. In particular, using quantitative, qualitative, and experimental methodologies, she studies how gender stereotypes affect women candidates’ electability. By applying a comparative perspective, she questions the generalizability of some aspects of conventional theories regarding women and politics. Via data collected in an original survey, she shows how, despite considering political leadership as masculine, individuals in Latin America–contrary to the literature expectations– evaluate women politicians as better political leaders than men. Yet, similar to other regions, women remain comparatively under-represented in politics. Her dissertation offers an answer to this puzzle, by theorizing over how this positive scenario can actually harm women candidates’ electability. The core thesis is that the idealization of women in leadership leads voters to hold women candidates to a higher standard. In this respect, she explores the consequences of women’s presence in politics for the evolution of gender political stereotypes.  


     

 

Michael E. Shepherd                                                                                                                     Shepherd head shot

  • Email: Michael.e.shepherd@vanderbilt.edu
  • Website link: www.michaeleshepherd.com
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Fields of study: American Politics; Public Policy; Quantitative Methods
  • Bio: Michael Shepherd is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Medicine, Health, and Society and a faculty member in the Data Science Institute at Vanderbilt University. Michael’s research focuses on questions of political and economic inequality, with a special focus on the experiences of the poor with government and the representation of the interests of the poor in policymaking. Michael’s current work focuses on the roles of partisanship, race, and racial attitudes in individuals’ health experiences, attitudes, and behaviors. He has forthcoming or has published multiple articles on elections, public policy, and health care in the American Political Science Review, the Election Law Journal, Political Science Research & Methods, the Journal of Public Policy, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.