Current Undergraduate Courses

MHS 1001. Commons Seminar. [Formerly MHS 99] Topics vary. General Elective credit only. [1] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 1111. First-Year Writing Seminar. [Formerly MHS 115F] Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of 1111] (AXLE credit category varies by section)

MHS 1500. Introduction to Microbiology. [Formerly NURS 1500] Diversity of bacteria and viruses. Genetics and metabolism of bacteria. Pathogenesis, host immune defense mechanisms, rationale for antimicrobial drugs. Bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites important to humans. No credit for students who have earned credit for NURS 1500. [3-4] (MNS)

MHS 1600. Introduction to Nutrition and Health for a Changing World. [Formerly NURS 1600] Nutrition science and research; basic principles of digestion and absorption; role of specific nutrients and dietary practices in health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Nutrition throughout the lifespan. Not intended for students who have previously taken NURS 1601 or NURS 1602. [3] (MNS)

MHS 1920. Politics of Health. [Formerly MHS 170] Sociocultural analysis of the conflicts, definitions, inequalities, and structures of power that influence health. [3] (P)

MHS 1930. Social Dimensions of Health and Illness. [Formerly MHS 201] Multidisciplinary introduction to health conditions from perspectives of anthropology, economics, history, political science and policy studies, philosophy, religious studies, and sociology. Guest lectures by representatives of various disciplines. [3] (P)

MHS 1940. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. [Formerly MHS 180] Relationship between health outcomes and race and ethnicity. Historical and contemporary factors influencing differences in health outcomes, including mental health, HIV/AIDS, and other chronic diseases. Explanations of health disparities and of strategies to reduce them. [3] (SBS)

MHS 1950. Theories of the Body. Interdisciplinary study of the human body through critical theory, history, philosophy, art, and popular culture. How cultural understandings of bodies reflect broader social, political, scientific, and legal regimes. No credit for students who have earned credit for 290-02 in fall 2013. [3] (HCA)

MHS 2110. American Medicine and the World. [Formerly MHS 208] Social foundations of medical authority. Health disparities in the United States and abroad. Effects of social settings of medical research, evaluation, and treatment on health outcomes. Inequalities in medical knowledge and institutions. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 3 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 2120. Health Social Movements. [Formerly MHS 210] Health inequality and inequity based on race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality. Issues related to access to health care services. Crusades for certain diseases, illness experiences, and disabilities. Challenging science on etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 1 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 2130. Social Movements and Community Action. [Formerly MHS 211] The literature of social activism. How citizens individually and collectively accomplish and resist social change. Historical and contemporary health movements as case studies to illustrate the advantages and limitations of social change strategies. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2150. Medical Humanities. [Formerly MHS 248] Conceptual and creative analysis of philosophy, literature, art, and music to identify and account for human nature in the medical context. Ethical, practical, and social management of medical technology. Theories of art, music, and literature to understand human creativity and self-explanation in the face of illness and difference. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 295 section 2 in either spring 2010 or spring 2009. [3] (HCA)

MHS 2230. Masculinity and Men’s Health. [Formerly MHS 232] Interdisciplinary approach to men’s health issues and to perceptions of masculinity. The history of men’s diseases. Men in clinical settings. Social policies that affect men’s health behaviors. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 5 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 2240. Bionic Bodies, Disability Cultures. [Formerly MHS 242] Historical and cultural evolution of prosthetics, artificial limbs, and other assistive technologies. Shifts in social views resulting from war, economics, and art and design. [3] (HCA)

MHS 2250. War and the Body. [Formerly MHS 212] Impact of war on the human body. Anthropology of the body and theories of bodily experience. Production, representation, and experience of war and of military and medical technologies on a bodily level. Acceptable and unacceptable types of harm. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 2 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 2310. Chinese Society and Medicine. [Formerly MHS 231] Medicine and health in contemporary China. Social organization of medical care, social determinants of health and disease, social construction of health and disease, and health-related social problems. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 3 in fall 2010 and section 1 in fall 2011. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2320. Medicine, Law, and Society. [Formerly MHS 244] Survey of issues in medicine and law, including the physician-patient relationship, medical malpractice, organ donation, healthcare financing, and the limits and powers of the government to protect the public’s health. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 3 in fall 2010, 290 section 2 in spring 2010, or 290 section 2 in spring 2009. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2330. Men’s Health Research & Policy. [Formerly MHS 234] Concepts and theories of men’s health. Global and domestic issues. Effect of men’s social and economic advantages on health outcomes. Strategies to improve men’s health; relationships between cultural values and health policy; and cultural explanations that shape men’s health campaigns. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 14 in spring 2013. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2350. Italian Representations of Wellness and Illness. From 1300 to the present. Depictions of health and sickness in Italian literature, art, and film. Historical, cultural, and social dimensions of health in Italy and changes in the societal approach to health. Italian society’s views on health, wellness, and the stigmatization of physical and mental illness. [3] (INT)

MHS 2410. HIV/AIDS in the Global Community. [Formerly MHS 236] Medical, social, political, economic, and public policy dimensions of HIV/ AIDS. Prevention and treatment strategies, social stigma, and discrimination. Repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 2 in fall 2009 and for students who completed 290 section 5 in fall 2008. [3] (P)

MHS 2420. Economic Demography and Global Health. [Formerly MHS 206] Economic consequences of demographic change in developing and developed countries. Links between socioeconomic status and health; relationship between health and economic growth; determinants of fertility, mortality, and migration. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2430. Social Capital and Health. [Formerly MHS 240] Theoretical approaches to social capital and their applications to the social production of disease and illness. Theoretical background of social capital; the conceptualization and measurement of social capital; and the multiple roles of social capital as a social antecedent of health. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 5 in spring 2010 and section 1 in spring 2011. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2510. Caring for Vulnerable Populations. [Formerly MHS 237] Humanitarian aid and the risks and responsibilities in providing for vulnerable populations. Differences between acute and chronic crises. Geopolitical, cultural, clinical, and practical factors. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 290 section 3 in spring 2010 and for students who completed 290 section 4 in either spring 2009 or spring 2008. [3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 2520. Autism in Context. [Formerly MHS 250] Multiple manifestations. Impact, questions, and debates. Familial, educational, sociological, legal, and medical contexts. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2610. Global Health Crises. Development of global health priorities, responses to emerging crises, and unintended consequences of global health interventions. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3890-01 offered fall 2015 or 3890-02 offered spring 2016. [3] (INT)

MHS 2920. Medicine on Trial. Medicine as an object of dispute and a source of evidence in courts of law. Key cases and issues in Western law. Medicine adjudicated in religious, military, tribal, national, and international courts. No credit for students who have earned credit for 290-01 offered fall 2014. [3] (SBS)

MHS 2940. Race, Citizenship, and Health. Social and historical impacts of immigration, settlement, nation formation, labor exploitation, imperialism, and globalization on populations categorized as victims, vectors of disease, or sanitary citizens. Health as a key site in which the meaning of race and citizenship are developed and navigated. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3000 offered fall 2016 or spring 2017. [3] (P)

MHS 2950. Healing Animals. Animals as subjects of medical research and as patients in veterinary medicine. Health of animals as friends, food, entertainment, and vectors of disease. Celebration and concealment of the centrality of animals in modern medicine through legal, economic, social, and emotional techniques. No credit for students who earned credit for 290-03 offered spring 2015. [3] (P)

MHS  3000. Undergraduate  Seminar. [Formerly MHS 295] Advanced reading, research, and writing. Topics vary. Limited to juniors and seniors with preference to majors in Medicine, Health, and Society. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Offered on a graded basis only. [3; maximum of 6 credits total for all semesters of MHS 3000] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3010. Global Health Principles and Practice. Introduction to major global health principles and practices in the developing and developed world. Perspectives of public health practitioners and critical thinking about global health challenges and solutions. [3] (P)

MHS 3020. U.S. Public Health Ethics and Policy. [Formerly MHS 203] Critical perspectives on ethical and policy issues in U.S. public health. [3] (P)

MHS 3030. Community Health Research. [Formerly MHS 235] Conceptual and methodological challenges. Focus on descriptive studies and intervention research to address health disparities in chronic diseases and psychiatric disorders. [3] (SBS)

MHS 3040. Designing Healthy Publics. Politics of public health and the built environment in U.S. cities from the nineteenth century to the present. Critical perspectives on health promotion, research, and design. Nashville as a case study. No credit for students who earned credit for 248 in fall 2014. [3] (US)

MHS 3050W. Medicine and Literature. [Formerly MHS 205W] Narrative analysis, and other humanistic, interpretive practices of relevance to medicine and health. [3] (HCA)

MHS 3101. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. [Formerly NURS 3101] Structure and function of the human organism. Integration of the gross anatomical structures and organ systems with microscopic structure, physiological function, and homeostatic mechanisms. Clinical relevance of selected topics. No credit for students who have earned credit for NURS 3101. One semester of a college-level course in biology or chemistry is expected. [4] (MNS)

MHS 3102. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. [Formerly NURS 3102] Continuation of 3101. Structure and function of the human organism. Integration of the gross anatomical structures and organ systems with microscopic structure, physiological function, and homeostatic mechanisms. Clinical relevance of selected topics. No credit for students who have earned credit for NURS 3102. [4] (MNS)

MHS 3110. Global Health and Social Justice. [Formerly MHS 204] Global health institutions, policies, and practices. Issues of social justice. Anthropological, sociological, and scientific studies that address the social, moral, political and economic factors influencing the definition of and response to global health problems. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 4 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 3120. Medicine, Technology, and Society. [Formerly MHS 245] Tensions between art and science in medicine. The effect of science and technology on the doctor-patient relationship. Social and ethical issues raised by new biomedical developments. Repeat credit for students who completed 295 section 1 in fall 2009. [3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3140. Afrofuturism and Cultural Criticisms of Medicine. [Formerly MHS 216] Exploration of Afrofuturism as a literary genre and its critique of the impact of techno-science and medicine on black health, life, and futurity. Multidisciplinary approach in understanding novels, memoirs, and secondary texts. No credit for students who earned credit for 290 section 3 in fall 2013. [3] (HCA)

MHS 3150. Death and Dying in America. [Formerly MHS 225] Interdisciplinary introduction to thanatology; changes in medicine and attitudes towards dying as they reshape the American way of death in a multicultural landscape. [3] (P)

MHS 3210. Health, Development, and Culture in Guatemala. [Formerly MHS 281A] Social dimensions of health in Guatemalan communities. History, culture, and political economy. Spanish language skills strongly recommended. No credit for students who earned credit for INDS 270a section 3 in spring 2010 or 218 in spring 2014. Instructor consent required. [3] (INT)

MHS 3212. Health, Development, and Culture in Guatemala. [Formerly MHS 218B] Social and political dimensions of health and development in Guatemala through fieldwork and service learning in rural Maya communities in Quetzaltenango and Sololá. Prerequisite: 3210. [1-3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3220. Healthcare Organizations. [Formerly MHS 222] Key healthcare organizations in the context of policies governing the U.S. healthcare system. How organizations and policies shape the meaning of health and the dynamics of medical encounters. No credit for students who have earned credit for 295 in spring 2012. [3] (SBS)

MHS 3250. Perspectives on Trauma. [Formerly MHS 254] Trauma as a framework for understanding  individual and collective suffering. Trauma in the context of medicine, war, and politics, and of racial, sexual, and gender inequalities. Alternative ways of conceptualizing  feeling, memory and loss. No credit for students who earned credit for 295 section 02 in spring 2013. [3] (SBS)

MHS 3310. Healthcare Systems Comparisons. [Formerly MHS 256] Maymester. Travel to France and Italy. Comparison of US healthcare system to universal healthcare systems. On-site healthcare facilities visits. Role of government, insurance coverage and financing, strategies, quality of care, disparities, care coordination, electronic health records, costs, innovations and reforms. Taught in English. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] (INT)

MHS 3320. Introduction to U.S. Health Care Policy. Key features of U.S. health care system. Financing and delivery; historical trends; and comparisons to other countries. Methods of health policy evaluation. [3] (SBS)

MHS 3350. Medicine, Religion, and Spirituality. [Formerly MHS 246] How individuals, families, and communities deal with such life events as birth, serious illness and injury, disability, war, and death through the combined belief in medicine and religion. Sources include fiction, poetry, drama, film, and texts. Research seminar. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 295 section 2 in either fall 2009 or fall 2008. [3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3450. Mental Illness Narratives. Mental illness experiences through memoir, film, and spoken word. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3890-01 offered spring 2017 or 3890-02 offered fall 2016. [3] (P)

MHS 3830. Service Learning. [Formerly MHS 294A] Under faculty supervision, students will design a program of community service associated with a set of learning objectives. The service component (3830) should benefit both the recipient and the provider of the service, offering the latter opportunities for self-reflection, self-discovery, and the development of values, skills, and knowledge. A central objective must be firsthand experience of a central issue or issues studied in sociology, psychology, political science, economics, or another academic discipline. The MHS program will work to find placements for interested students. The other component, 3831, will consist of an independent study in the relevant discipline and must be closely linked to the issue(s) addressed in 3830. For example, a student may provide services to the elderly in nursing homes and use 3831 to study how state and federal policies affect the delivery of health care and other services to nursing home populations. To be accepted, students must have a 2.90 overall grade point average and 6 hours of prior work in approved MHS courses. They must submit a specific plan for the service-learning experience to the MHS program director. Must be taken Pass/Fail and concurrently with 3831. These hours shall not be included in the minimum hours required for the MHS major or minor. After completing the experience,  all students must write a thorough report. Corequisite: 3831. [1-3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3831. Service Learning Research and Readings. [Formerly MHS

294B] Under faculty supervision, students will design a program of community service associated with a set of learning objectives. The service component (3830) should benefit both the recipient and the provider of the service, offering the latter opportunities for self-reflection, self-discovery, and the development of values, skills, and knowledge. A central objective must be firsthand experience of a central issue or issues studied in sociology, psychology, political science, economics, or another academic discipline. The MHS program will work to find placements for interested students. The other component – 3831 – will consist of an independent study in the relevant discipline and must be closely linked to the issue(s) addressed  in 3830. For example, a student may provide services to the elderly in nursing homes and use 3831 to study how state and federal policies affect the delivery of health care and other services to nursing home populations. To be accepted, students must have a 2.90 overall grade point average and 6 hours of prior work in approved MHS courses. They must submit a specific plan for the service-learning experience to the MHS program director. Students will write a substantial research or interpretative paper under the supervision of a Vanderbilt faculty member on a topic related to their service learning experience. Corequisite: 3830. [1-3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3850. Independent Study. [Formerly MHS 296] A program of reading and/or research in one area of MHS studies to be selected in consultation with an adviser. Normally limited to qualified MHS minors or majors. Approval of faculty adviser and MHS program director required for enrollment. May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. (However, students in the MHS honors program may count a total of 12 hours in MHS 3850, including the 6 hours in the senior year devoted to preparation of the honors thesis. The same instructor will ordinarily supervise work on the honors thesis in both fall and spring semesters; a student may work with a thesis adviser who has previously supervised an independent study with that student.) [1-3; maximum of 6 credits for all semesters of MHS 3850; maximum of 12 credits for students in the MHS honors program] (No AXLE credit)

MHS  3880. Internship Training. [Formerly MHS 293A] Under faculty supervision, students from any discipline can gain experience in a broad range of public and private agencies, institutions, and programs devoted to health care, public health, health-related policy and research. Two options are available. (1) Full-time: 12-15 hours total, including 6-9 hours in 3880, and 6 hours in 3881. (2) Part-time: 2-9 hours total, including 1-6 hours in 3880 and 1-3 hours in 3881. To be accepted for either option, students must have a 2.90 grade point average and 6 hours of prior work in approved MHS courses; they must submit a specific plan for the internship to the MHS program director. After completing the internship, all students must write a thorough report. Note: All work for an internship must be completed during a single semester or summer. Must be taken Pass/Fail and concurrently with 3881. These hours shall not be included in the minimum hours required for the MHS major or minor. Corequisite: 3881. [Variable credit: 1-9] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3881. Internship Readings and Research. [Formerly MHS 293B] Under faculty supervision, students from any discipline can gain experience in a broad range of public and private agencies, institutions, and programs devoted to health care, public health, health-related policy and research. Two options  are available. (1) Full-time: 12-15 hours total, including 6-9 hours in 3880, and 6 hours in 3881. (2) Part-time:  2-9 hours total, including 1-6 hours in 3880 and 1-3 hours in 3881. To be accepted for either option, students must have a 2.90 grade point average and 6 hours of prior work in approved MHS courses; they must submit a specific plan for the internship to the MHS program director. After completing the internship, all students must write a thorough report. Note: All work for an internship must be completed during a single semester or summer. Students will write a substantial research or interpretative paper under the supervision of a regular Vanderbilt faculty member. Corequisite: 3880. [Variable credit: 1-6] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 3890. Special Topics. [Formerly MHS 290] May be repeated for credit twice if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3; maximum of 9 credits total for all semesters of MHS 3890] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 4010. Psychiatry, Culture, and Globalization. [Formerly MHS 252] Cross-cultural analysis of mental illness; the emergence of cultural psychiatry; and the globalization of biopsychiatry and neuroscience. No credit for students who earned credit for 295 section 2 in fall 2012. [3] (P)

MHS 4050. Narrative and Medicine: Stories of Illness and the Doctor- Patient Relationship. [Formerly MHS 220] Use of classical and contemporary illness narratives to understand the doctor-patient relationship. Focus on patient stories in clinical settings. [3] (HCA)

MHS 4998. Honors Research. [Formerly MHS 297] Offered on a graded basis only. Limited to seniors admitted to the departmental honors program. [3] (No AXLE credit)

MHS 4999. Honors Thesis. [Formerly MHS 298] Offered on a graded basis only. Limited to seniors admitted to the departmental honors program. [3] (No AXLE credit)

Upcoming Events

Sept. 25: Master’s Info Session
Oct. 2: MHS Colloquium with Dr. Lauren Gaydosh

Oct. 16: Advising Pizza Party

Oct. 16: Mental Illness, Race, Inequality, and…Incarceration, Panel featuring Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall, VUPD Captain Leshuan Oliver, Dr. Jonathan Metzl, and Dr. Derek Griffith