Skip to main content

‘United Nations’

Do Human Rights Treaties Matter: The Case for the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities

Jul. 9, 2019—Author: Arlene Kanter PDF: Do Human Rights Treaties Matter   Abstract In the United States, and throughout many other parts of the world, we are witnessing attacks on basic human rights. As poverty, inequality, and suffering are evident in so many parts of the world today, there are those who say that the entire human...

Read more


A Post-Millennial Inquiry into the United Nations Law of Self-Determination: A Right to Unilateral Non-Colonial Secession?

Jan. 19, 2017—The present Article inquires whether a right to unilateral non-colonial (UNC) secession is grounded in the United Nations (UN) law of self-determination. The Article argues that peoples subjected to deliberate, sustained, and systematic human rights abuses in extremis (e.g., ethnic cleansing, mass killings, or genocide) by the existing state have an international customary law right...

Read more


The Special Tribunal for Lebanon: A Defense Perspective

May. 30, 2014—This Article analyzes the absence of organs tasked with guaranteeing the rights of the defense in international criminal law. It explains the historical origins of the problem, tracing it back to the genesis of modern prosecutions at the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal. It then explains how the organizational charts of the UN courts for the...

Read more


Managing the “Republic of NGOs:” Accountability and Legitimation Problems Facing the UN Cluster System

Mar. 17, 2014—This Article critically assesses the crucial but troubled system for the coordination of international humanitarian assistance—the UN “cluster approach.” Regardless of whether the cluster approach actually helps in disaster response, it exercises substantial power over affected populations by assigning competences and leadership roles. The built-in mechanisms for controlling this power are unworkable because they ultimately...

Read more


Climate Change, Forests, and International Law: REDD’s Descent into Irrelevance

Mar. 17, 2014—Forestry activities account for over 17 percent of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. Since 2005, parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change have been negotiating a mechanism known as REDD—Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation—to provide an incentive for developing countries to reduce carbon emissions and limit deforestation at the same time. When...

Read more


Is Seasteading the High Seas a Legal Possibility? Filling the Gaps in International Sovereignty Law and the Law of the Seas

May. 29, 2013—Seasteading––homesteading of the modern era––is a desire to develop above-water settlements in international waters known as seasteads. Once a fleeting dream, seasteading has entered the realm of possibility with the technological advancements and financial contributions of The Seasteading Institute (TSI). TSI’s ultimate goal is ambitious: to establish permanent seasteads as sovereign states recognized by the...

Read more


Two (or Five, or Ten) Heads are Better than One: The Need for an Integrated Effort to International Election Monitoring

Oct. 16, 2012—Election monitoring efforts have a crucial role to play in attaining the goals of self-determination and democratic sovereignty.  Yet current election monitoring practice suffers from variance in the goals, standards, and strategies employed by the many organizations that engage in election monitoring and observation programs.  This Note examines the current state of election monitoring within...

Read more


Human Dignity in the Line of Fire: The Application of International Human Rights Law During Armed Conflict, Occupation, and Peace Operations

Sep. 21, 2012—One of the most controversial and politically charged issues in current human rights discourse is whether and to what extent states are bound by human rights obligations with respect to the conduct of their armed forces abroad in armed conflict, occupation, and peace operations.  Underlying the controversy are a number of complex legal questions, several...

Read more


Neotrusteeship or Mistrusteeship? The “Authority Creep” Dilemma in United Nations Transitional Administration

Jul. 24, 2012—State failure poses one of the greatest threats to international peace and security.  The collapse of governing institutions breeds civil wars, generates refugee flows, causes enormous civilian suffering, foments instability in neighboring countries, and provides safe havens for transnational criminal and terrorist organizations.  As a result, commentators and policymakers have increasingly called for a remedy...

Read more


Treaty Bodies and the Interpretation of Human Rights

Jul. 11, 2012—The eight United Nations human rights treaty bodies play an important role in establishing the normative content of human rights and in giving concrete meaning to individual rights and state obligations.  Unfortunately, their output often suffers from methodological weaknesses and lack of coherence and analytical rigor, which compromise its legitimacy. This Article suggests that these...

Read more


>

ExpressO Top 10 Law Review


ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Journal is pleased to announce its 2019-2020 Board of Editors. VJTL-Masthead-2019-2020

The Journal is pleased to announce its 2018-2019 Board of Editors. Complete-Masthead-2018-2019

Vanderbilt University Law School Professor Michael A. Newton’s 2016 VJTL Article entitled How the International Criminal Court Threatens Treaty Norms  was cited by the International Criminal Court prosecutor’s November 2017 filing seeking investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan.

May 2018 Issue on the Second Israel Defense Forces International Conference on the Law of Armed Conflict. Read more about the Journal’s May 2018 issue here.

Thank you to everyone who attended the Journal’s 50th Anniversary celebration on October 5, 2017! View photos from the event here and read about the Journal’s history here.

Connect with the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law on LinkedIn.

The Journal is pleased to listed as the #5 International Law Journal by the 2017 Washington and Lee Law Journal Rankings.

The Journal is very excited about the success of our February 2017 Symposium, “Sovereign Conduct on the Margins of the Law.” Read more about our February 2017 Symposium here

Please join us in congratulating the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 2017-2018 Write-On Competition Winners.

Video is available from the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law’s 2015-2016 SymposiumThis is Not a Drill: Confronting Legal Issues in the Wake of International Disasters. Watch here.