Skip to main content

Vol. 46 No. 4 Category

Cognitive Conflicts and the Making of International Law: From Empirical Concord to Conceptual Discord in Legal Scholarship

Nov. 8, 2013—It has long been claimed that international lawmaking has grown pluralized in the sense that it has allegedly moved away from the traditional Westphalian and state-centric model of lawmaking.  New processes outside traditional diplomatic channels and involving non-state actors are said to qualify as lawmaking, and the products thereof have come to be ascertainable as...

Read more


Reverse-Rhetorical Entrapment: Naming and Shaming as a Two-Way Street

Nov. 8, 2013—This Article argues that, rather than being mere targets, governments can and do engage in “reverse rhetorical entrapment,” thus shaping the strategies of human rights organizations.  Specifically, justifications for egregious conduct—at least when made by powerful governments—may draw human rights advocates into consequentialist debates about the utility of specific rights-violating practices. Using the case of...

Read more


Lawyers and Precedent

Nov. 8, 2013—Any account of international law that does not explain the role of lawyers will necessarily be deficient. This is particularly the case with regard to the mysterious power of precedent in international law. Regardless of precedent’s formal role in international law, lawyers and judges regularly invoke it, respond to it, and cite it as authority....

Read more


Blood Diamonds and Non-State Actors

Nov. 8, 2013—The Kimberley Process did not end the major diamond wars, but it entirely changed the way the trade in rough diamonds was managed and reported. It made large transactions in illicit stones more difficult, and the very fact of the KP negotiations helped to starve rebel armies of weapons and ammunition. The KP was the...

Read more


Constraining Targeting in Noninternational Armed Conflicts: Safe Conduct for Combatants Conducting Informal Dispute Resolution

Nov. 8, 2013—Margulies newSome evidence suggests that informal negotiators have been either targeted or become collateral damage in U.S. drone strikes. This evidence might be unreliable. However, if it is accurate, even in part, that should be a concern even for those who support the broad outlines of the U.S. targeting strategy. Responding to this concern, this...

Read more


Constraining Global Corporate Power: A Short Introduction

Nov. 8, 2013—This Essay sets out three models of institutional constraint of global corporate power. First is private lawmaking, in which the non-state power of firms is countered by the non-state power of civil society organizations. Second are nonlegalized processes under public institutional umbrellas, in which public entities host standards-setting mechanisms. Finally, there is the prospect of...

Read more


>

ExpressO Top 10 Law Review


ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Journal is pleased to announce its 2018-2019 Board of Editors. View the complete masthead here.

Vanderbilt University Law School Professor Michael A. Newton’s 2016 VJTL Article entitled How the International Criminal Court Threatens Treaty Norms  was cited by the International Criminal Court prosecutor’s November 2017 filing seeking investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan.

May 2018 Issue on the Second Israel Defense Forces International Conference on the Law of Armed Conflict. Read more about the Journal’s May 2018 issue here.

Thank you to everyone who attended the Journal’s 50th Anniversary celebration on October 5, 2017! View photos from the event here and read about the Journal’s history here.

Connect with the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law on LinkedIn.

The Journal is pleased to listed as the #5 International Law Journal by the 2017 Washington and Lee Law Journal Rankings.

The Journal is very excited about the success of our February 2017 Symposium, “Sovereign Conduct on the Margins of the Law.” Read more about our February 2017 Symposium here

Please join us in congratulating the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 2017-2018 Write-On Competition Winners.

Video is available from the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law’s 2015-2016 SymposiumThis is Not a Drill: Confronting Legal Issues in the Wake of International Disasters. Watch here.