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Foodborne Infections and the Global Food Supply: Improving Health at Home and Abroad

Aug. 9, 2012—In recent years, fourteen percent of the U.S. food supply has been imported from other countries, including many fresh and perishable foods.  Although most outbreaks of illness and individual cases are related to foods from the United States, large and unusual outbreaks have been traced to imported foods that were likely contaminated in the country...

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Judicial Interference: Redefining the Role of the Judiciary within the Context of U.S. and E.U. Merger Clearance Coordination

Jul. 25, 2012—In December 2003, Sony and Bertelsmann AG (BMG) sought approval from the Federal Trade Commission and European Commission to effectuate a joint venture between the two companies.  Remarkably, almost two years after both antitrust authorities had cleared the Sony-BMG joint venture, the Court of First Instance annulled the European Commission’s decision to approve the transaction. ...

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Choosing Between Liberalization and Regulatory Autonomy under GATS: Implications of U.S.-Gambling for Trade in Cross Border E-Services

Jul. 25, 2012—In 2005, the World Trade Organization (WTO) Appellate Body presided over United States—Measures affecting the cross-border supply of gambling and betting services (U.S.-Gambling), in which Antigua argued that U.S. criminal laws banning the provision of cross-border online gambling services violate U.S. commitments under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).  For the first time,...

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Resolving the Dissonance of Rodriguez and the Right to Education: International Human Rights Instruments as a Source of Repose for the United States

Jul. 24, 2012—Education exists as a fundamental right recognized by countries worldwide.  Overwhelming support for the right to education is reflected in international human rights instruments, including the International Convention on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.  Notwithstanding a near global consensus on this issue, the United States has...

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Reinventing American Immigration Policy for the 21st Century

Jul. 24, 2012—With an estimated eleven to twelve million undocumented workers currently in the United States, the need for immigration reform is critical.  As lawmakers grapple with the question of how to best meet the needs of the country, they should keep in mind that the United States is a country of immigration.  If the U.S. reverts...

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Increasing Global Demand for an Uncensored Internet—How the U.S. Can Help Defeat Online Censorship by Facilitating Private Action

Jul. 24, 2012—This Note discusses efforts to defeat government censorship of the Internet.  In the narrow meaning of that idea, this Note initially discusses technological efforts to circumvent government-imposed Internet firewalls; in the broader sense, it addresses the larger goal of inducing censoring governments to bring their firewalls down.  Proposed U.S. legislation would provide U.S. government funding...

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Lost in Translation: International Criminal Tribunals and the Legal Implications of Interpreted Testimony

Jul. 24, 2012—When courtroom interpreters translate a witness’s testimony, errors are not just possible, they are inherent to the process.  Moreover, the occurrence of such errors is not merely a technical problem; errors can infringe on the rights of defendants or even lead to verdicts based on faulty findings of fact.  International criminal proceedings, which are necessarily...

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Neotrusteeship or Mistrusteeship? The “Authority Creep” Dilemma in United Nations Transitional Administration

Jul. 24, 2012—State failure poses one of the greatest threats to international peace and security.  The collapse of governing institutions breeds civil wars, generates refugee flows, causes enormous civilian suffering, foments instability in neighboring countries, and provides safe havens for transnational criminal and terrorist organizations.  As a result, commentators and policymakers have increasingly called for a remedy...

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The Bologna Process and Its Impact in Europe: It’s So Much More than Degree Changes

Jul. 24, 2012—The Bologna Process is a massive, multi-year project designed to create the “European Higher Education Area” by the year 2010.  It began ten years ago, when four European Union (EU) countries signed a relatively vague declaration.  It has grown to include forty-six countries, including all of the EU Member States and nineteen non-EU countries.  The...

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Tissue Tug-of-War: A Comparison of International and U.S. Perspectives on the Regulation of Human Tissue Banks

Jul. 23, 2012—Every day in the United States and around the world, patients and research participants at hospitals and doctors’ offices give biological samples, whether in the form of surgically removed cancer tissue or a routine blood sample.  Many of these patients are entirely unaware that their tissues were not thrown out as hazardous waste, and instead...

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Journal is pleased to announce its 2018-2019 Board of Editors. View the complete masthead here.

Vanderbilt University Law School Professor Michael A. Newton’s 2016 VJTL Article entitled How the International Criminal Court Threatens Treaty Norms  was cited by the International Criminal Court prosecutor’s November 2017 filing seeking investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan.

May 2018 Issue on the Second Israel Defense Forces International Conference on the Law of Armed Conflict. Read more about the Journal’s May 2018 issue here.

Thank you to everyone who attended the Journal’s 50th Anniversary celebration on October 5, 2017! View photos from the event here and read about the Journal’s history here.

Connect with the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law on LinkedIn.

The Journal is pleased to listed as the #5 International Law Journal by the 2017 Washington and Lee Law Journal Rankings.

The Journal is very excited about the success of our February 2017 Symposium, “Sovereign Conduct on the Margins of the Law.” Read more about our February 2017 Symposium here

Please join us in congratulating the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 2017-2018 Write-On Competition Winners.

Video is available from the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law’s 2015-2016 SymposiumThis is Not a Drill: Confronting Legal Issues in the Wake of International Disasters. Watch here.