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The Faults in “Fair” Trials: An Evaluation of Regulation 55 at the International Criminal Court

Mar. 29, 2015—Despite its reputation as a “provision of an exceptional nature,” Regulation 55 has become one of the most contested procedural devices employed by the judges at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Hailing from civil law tradition, Regulation 55 permits the ICC to modify the charges against an accused at any time—either during or after the...

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Manifest Illegality and the ICC Superior Orders Defense: Schuldtheorie Mistake of Law Doctrine as an Article 33(1)(c) Panacea

Dec. 20, 2014—While the Anglo-American and international legal systems adhere to the rule that “a mistake of the law excuses no one,” German Schuldtheorie mistake of law doctrine provides for a mistake of law excuse if a defendant’s mistaken belief in the lawfulness of his conduct was unavoidable. In a distinct but increasingly overlapping area of law,...

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Getting Off the Mommy Track: An International Model Law Solution to the Global Maternity Discrimination Crisis

Dec. 20, 2014—Women’s roles in workplaces around the globe have been growing steadily for the past half-century. Yet, in everything from pay to advancement, workplace gender discrimination persists, much of it based on women’s unique role as child bearers. Of the countless domestic and international efforts to address maternity discrimination, none has been completely successful. Drawing from...

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Soy Dominicano – The Status of Haitian Descendants Born in the Dominican Republic and Measures to Protect Their Right to a Nationality

Nov. 27, 2014—In September 25, 2013, the Constitutional Tribunal of the Dominican Republic retroactively interpreted the Dominican Constitution to deny Dominican citizenship to children born to irregular migrants in Dominican territory since 1929. The tribunal’s decision disproportionately affects approximately two hundred thousand persons of Haitian descent. In general, states have the right to determine their nationality criteria....

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Gimme Shelter: International Political Asylum in the Information Age

Nov. 27, 2014—On June 5, 2013, an article in the Guardian revealed highly classified information about surveillance operations being performed by the United States National Security Administration (NSA). The source of this information was a former NSA contractor named Edward Snowden. After arriving in Moscow on June 23, Snowden spent the next forty days in the transit...

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The Monetary Fifth Column: The Eurodollar Threat to Financial Stability and Economic Sovereignty

May. 30, 2014—Eurodollars are dollar-denominated deposit liabilities of banks outside the United States. Even though estimates of the size of the Eurodollar market exceed $5 trillion, these instruments are virtually unregulated. Legal scholarship has very little to say about Eurodollars, and the economic literature on the subject is geared toward economists and banking professionals rather than policy...

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The Epic Struggle for Dolphin-Safe Tuna: To Be Continued—A Case for Accommodating Nonprotectionist Eco-labels in the WTO

May. 30, 2014—In May 2012, the World Trade Organization (WTO) struck down the United States’ dolphin-safe tuna labeling standard as a barrier to trade that is prohibited by the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement (TBT). The analysis in the US-Tuna II report questions the validity of standardized eco-labels enforced by WTO Member States, which are an increasingly...

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Amnesty or Accountability: The Fate of High-Ranking Child Soldiers in Uganda’s Lord’s Resistance Army

May. 16, 2014—In May 2013, Uganda surprisingly resurrected its amnesty provision for two more years after having let it lapse only a year earlier. Uganda’s vacillation likely represents its competing desires to grant amnesty to low-level actors in the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and to end impunity for decades of gross human rights violations in accordance with...

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Demanding Accountability Where Accountability Is Due: A Functional Necessity Approach to Diplomatic Immunity Under the Vienna Convention

May. 16, 2014—This Note addresses the inability of domestic workers to seek redress for exploitation by diplomat employers. In examining the legal quagmire facing these workers, this Note highlights a departure by courts from the functional necessity theory underlying the Vienna Convention. Courts now rely wholly on the U.S. State Department’s interpretation of the scope of diplomatic...

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Blackwater’s New Battlefield: Toward a Regulatory Regime in the United States for Privately Armed Contractors Operating at Sea

Mar. 17, 2014—Piracy has reemerged with a vengeance in the twenty-first century. Although it is confined primarily to the horn of Africa, piracy poses a significant problem to commercial shipping companies that need to traverse the Gulf of Aden for business. In response to modern-day piracy, shipowners have begun to employ privately armed contractors for protection. Countries...

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Journal is pleased to announce its 2018-2019 Board of Editors. View the complete masthead here.

Vanderbilt University Law School Professor Michael A. Newton’s 2016 VJTL Article entitled How the International Criminal Court Threatens Treaty Norms  was cited by the International Criminal Court prosecutor’s November 2017 filing seeking investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan.

May 2018 Issue on the Second Israel Defense Forces International Conference on the Law of Armed Conflict. Read more about the Journal’s May 2018 issue here.

Thank you to everyone who attended the Journal’s 50th Anniversary celebration on October 5, 2017! View photos from the event here and read about the Journal’s history here.

Connect with the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law on LinkedIn.

The Journal is pleased to listed as the #5 International Law Journal by the 2017 Washington and Lee Law Journal Rankings.

The Journal is very excited about the success of our February 2017 Symposium, “Sovereign Conduct on the Margins of the Law.” Read more about our February 2017 Symposium here

Please join us in congratulating the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 2017-2018 Write-On Competition Winners.

Video is available from the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law’s 2015-2016 SymposiumThis is Not a Drill: Confronting Legal Issues in the Wake of International Disasters. Watch here.