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GSN MONDAY MAILER APRIL 27 2015

Posted by on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 in News, Uncategorized.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
  1. A FEW LINKS
  2. GREAT SUMMER AND FALL PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS FROM U ARIZONA AND AVANCSO
  3. MAYA OF BELIZE WIN MAJOR LAND RIGHTS CASE
  4. EXPERT WITNESS HELP NEEDED ON ETHNIC RELATIONS IN TAJUMULCO
  5. EXPERT WITNESS HELP NEEDED ON TODOS SANTOS AND VIOLENCE

  1. A FEW LINKS
    1. Mine Company Slams Manager’s Arrest over Alleged Contamination in Guatemala http://laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2383587&CategoryId=23558

    2. UN Anti-Crime Commission's Future Uncertain in Guatemala 

      http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/04/19/world/americas/ap-lt-guatemala-un-commissions-future.html?ref=americas&_r=0

       

      4. Reporting on corruption proves deadly in Guatemala http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/4/28/reporting-on-corruption-proves-deadly-for-guatemalas-reporters.html




2. GREAT SUMMER AND FALL PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS FROM U RIZONA AND AVANCSO


Deadline Extended for Fall 2015 Semester Programa Internacional de Educación y Acción Social, IDEAS  in Guatemala.  Please let your students know that they still can take advantage of an incredible new Study Abroad opportunity.  IDEAS, a partnership between the University of Arizona and AVANCSO, the Association for the Advancement of Social Science brings together the academic rigor and experiential learning of the CIRMA Study Abroad Partnership (2005-2013) with AVANCSO's commitment to transformative research and action.  Moreover, IDEAS includes a tailored reflection-praxis course to help students integrate their daily experience and course study with critical analysis and future life plans. Interested students can earn University of Arizona credits with classes, homestay and internships in the Antigua area and a special Public Health program for advanced students. 

The Fall Semester includes a unique Latin American Studies course on women writers in Guatemala taught by IDEAS director and renowned Central American playwright and poet Dr. Ruben Najera.

Cost: Semester program: $9,975.  Summer program: $5,700. Fee includes tuition and academic fees (students receive a University of Arizona transcript), food  and   lodging  (except  for  meals on  Sundays), fieldtrip, health  insurance,  orientation, and  airport  pickup. Does not include airfare to Guatemala City or required  course books and reading materials. I will see if CAS-LASA will let me repost.

The extended Fall deadline is fast approaching (express interest by April 20 and apply by M

​y​ 

 1).  See program flyer or for an in-depth description: IDEAS Guatemala Program 2015To apply: https://global.arizona.edu/study-abroad/program/ideas-guatemala

Contact Elizabeth Oglesby, eoglesby@email.arizona.edu or Jennifer Casolo, jjcasolo@gmail.com for more information. 





3. MAYA OF BELIZE WIN MAJOR LAND RIGHTS CASE


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cristina Coc – 6375611 or mayaleadersbelize@gmail.com

Maya Q’eqchi and Mopan of Southern Belize Win Major Land Rights Victory in the Caribbean High Court

Punta Gorda, Belize, April 21st, 2015 – The Caribbean Court of Justice, Belize’s highest appellant court, yesterday reaffirmed the unbroken chain of lower court affirmations that the Maya Indigenous People of southern Belize have rights to lands they have customarily used and occupied. The Court affirmed that these traditional land rights constitute property within the meaning of the provisions of the Belize Constitution that generally protect property free from discrimination.

The judgement, which was rendered by agreement between the Maya representatives and the Government of Belize, requires the government to demarcate and register Maya village lands, and protect them against incursions by outsiders. The Court accepts the government’s undertaking to adopt the necessary ‘legislative, administrative, and/or other measures’ to that end and, in the meantime, to abstain from and prevent acts that would adversely affect Maya land rights. The Court retains supervision and in twelve months the parties will report on implementation.

“We have been dragged through the courts for over 30 years but today we are happy that the highest Court again stood with the my people to ensure that Belize gets on the right side of history,’ said Alfonso Cal the highest traditional leader for all the Maya villages. Cristina Coc, Spokes Person for the Maya Leaders Alliance and Toledo Alcaldes Association explained that the Court judgment marks yet another opportunity for Belize to rewrite its relationship with the first peoples of Belize. She elaborated that the fight of the Maya people is for all grassroots and marginalized peoples in Belize and worldwide. Professor James Anaya of the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program explained that the judgment “reinforces the international standard that indigenous peoples have collective property rights based on their own customary land tenure systems, even when they do not have formal title or other official recognition of those rights, and that states are bound to recognize and protect those rights.”

The Court judgement is the culmination of decades of litigation filed against the Government of Belize by the Maya Leaders Alliance and the Toledo Alcaldes Association on behalf of the Maya villages. The Government of Belize in the past has vigorously contested the Court assertions of Maya Customary land rights. The government reversed this position and came to an agreement that was the basis of the Court’s judgment by consent. While the major issue of Maya land rights has been settled, outstanding before the Court is the Maya’s claim for compensation for damages. The Court will hear the arguments on damages on Wednesday, April 22. After the Court hearing the Maya People will hold a press conference on this historic judgement at the Best Western Hotel in Belize City.

The Maya People’s victory today is a victory for all marginalized peoples in Belize and worldwide. The Maya People expresses gratitude and appreciation for the support that grew stronger year over year from Belizeans, the many Indigenous Peoples that sent their prayers and words of encouragement worldwide, to the Inter American Commission for Human Rights for its report of 2004 which helped to inform domestic litigation, the United Nations bodies that have raised consistently awareness on the need to protect Maya people’s rights and most deeply to our legal team that was put together and coordinated by the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program at the University Of Arizona James E. Rodgers College Of Law.



4. EXPERT WITNESS HELP NEEDED ON ETHNIC RELATIONS IN TAJUMULCO


I'm an attorney at an Immigration Law Firm in Coral Gables, Florida.  One of our clients has an Asylum case with the Miami Immigration court.  The judge wants to see independent evidence of the ethnic makeup of the town of Tajumulco, Guatemala before he can issue a decision on whether to grant relief to our client.We would highly appreciate it if you could direct us to a professor at FIU who would have relevant knowledge on this matter.  We would like to ask him/ her to sign an expert statement as independent evidence.  It would be a great help to our client.  Please let me know, thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Yi Song, Esq.

Gloria Roa Bodin, P.A.
90 Almeria Ave. Ste. 200
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Mobile: (954) 478-0420

Tel: (305) 442-1322
Fax: (305) 444-7578 

Fort Pierce Office
215 N. 2nd St.
Ft. Pierce, FL 34950
Tel: (772) 429-2888
Fax: (772) 429-2299


5. EXPERT WITNESS HELP NEEDED ON TODOS SANTOS AND VIOLENCE


I am an attorney for a nonprofit organization in Oakland, CA representing a young woman and her two daughters in an asylum case in removal proceedings. I am looking for an expert who can help speak to the plausibility of my client's claim as well as her ability to return to Guatemala safely.

Briefly, the case is as follows: My client's husband got into a car accident in the United States that resulted in the death of an individual from his and my client's village in Todos Santos. When her husband returned to Guatemala, the deceased's family began to threaten and abuse her and her husband. On several occasions, she was grabbed, strangled, and hit. She and her husband moved to Ixcan, but eventually the deceased's family located them there and threatened them. Then they escaped to Mexico, where the suffered from discrimination and racism. My client and her two daughters presented themselves at the US border seeking asylum, and her husband to this day is missing.

If you think you might be able to help, please contact me at emily@socialjusticecollaborative.org. I'm happy to share more details or speak over the phone about the case and what we are looking for. Her merits hearing is in July.

Thank you!

Emily

Emily Abraham | Director | Staff Attorney

Social Justice Collaborative | socialjusticecollaborative.org
420 3rd Street Suite 130 | Oakland, CA 94607

 


Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226