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GSN MONDAY MAILER APRIL 06 2015

Posted by on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 in News, Uncategorized.

GSN CONFERENCE —— GET THE WORD OUT

 

Guatemala Scholars Network

CALL FOR PAPERS

Third biannual Summer Conference

La Antigua, Guatemala (July 9th– 11th 2015

 

The Guatemalan Scholars Network (GSN) is seeking proposals for discussion base Invited Sessions, and Workshops to be presented in Guatemala.  This year’s emphasize is to promote a forum style discussion by bringing together perspectives across disciplines on proposed topics.  The program coordinators are particularly interested in topics that touch on the use of documentary resources such as archives, photography, film, and web sources.  We seek to highlight the organization’s mission of serving as an academic and scholar network across disciplines, institutions, and nations.   This is a great opportunity to engage in a deep discussion with Guatemalan scholars who have seldom opportunities to attend conferences abroad.  If you have specific theme proposals or want more information please contact conference organizers Sergio Romero (sergio.romero@austin.utexas.edu) or Christa Little-Siebold (christalittlesiebold@gmail.com)

 

Graduate students and young scholars working on Guatemala who are currently working in the field or writing up their work are encouraged to give a 5 minute abstract presentation of their work.  Based on the great demand presented on the last two conferences the twenty spaces will be filled on a first come first served basis.

 

Pre-registration is open until June 1st: $75 professionals, $30 students (includes a dinner).

On-site registration: $100 professionlas, $50 students (includes a dinner).

Registration is free for members in Latin America.

To register your 2015 dues membership must be up to date, you may pay dues at: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/gsn/annual-membership-dues

For questions, contact Kasia Szremski at kasia.szremski@vanderbilt.edu

 

Inscripción abierta hasta el 1ero de junio:  $75 profesionales, $30 estudiantes (incluye una cena).

Inscripción después del 1ero de junio:  $100 profesinales, $30 estudiantes (incluye una cena).

Inscripción para miembros de GSN latinaomericanos es gratis.  La cuota de 2015 debe de estar pagada: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/gsn/annual-membership-dues

Para inscribirse a la conferencia es importante tener pagada la cuota de membresía de GSN.

Para más información o para incsribirse favor de referirse a: Kasia Szremski, kasia.szremski@vanderbilt.edu

 


 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
  1. A FEW LINKS
  2. UPDATE ON VIOLENCE IN HUEHUETENANGO FROM GSN’ER LISA MAYA KNAUER
  3. STATEMENT FROM JOHNS HOPKINS LEADERSHIP ON THE LAWSUIT FILED BY GUATEMALA REGARDING THE STD STUDY
  4. PUERTO RICAN SCHOLARS SEEK CONNECTIONS FOR THEIR RESEARCH ON VISUAL IMPAIRMENT IN GUATEMALA
  5. NEW VOLUME AND PRESENTATION THIS THURSDAY ON VIOLENCE IN GUATEMALA FEATURING MULTIPLE GSN'ERS

  1. A FEW LINKS
    1. JOHNS HOPKINS SUED OVER STD STUDY IN GUATEMALA (ALSO SEE BELOW)  http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/4/1/johns-hopkins-sued-over-std-study-in-guatemala.html

 
2. UPDATE ON VIOLENCE IN HUEHUETENANGO FROM GSN’ER LISA MAYA KNAUER
 
Dear all:
The situation in northern Huehuetenango has continued to deteriorate. There have been several recent arrests, and two deaths of activists. I am including links to two petitions. The first one is from the Guatemalan Human RIghts Commission regarding the two activists who were killed. One died nearly two months after he was shot by the Mayor of Santa Eulalia, and the other man went missing in late March and his body was found a few days later. Here is a link to the petition:
 
 
The other petition is demanding the release of two of the men recently arrested, Rigoberto Juárez Mateo and Domingo Baltazar both of Santa Eulalia.
 
 
Below I have provided some background information — a bit more extensive than what is on the two petitions. I have not detailed all of the arrests, protests and military incursions in this region –nit would take several pages to do so –but just some of the highlights.
 
There has been widespread opposition throughout northern Huehuetenango to several hydroelectric ventures, most of which are funded by Spanish capital. The repressive response of the companies and the state has already cost five lives. In May 2012, peasant leader Andrés Pedro Miguel from Barillas was killed by Hidro Santa Cruz security guards. The ensuing protests resulted in the declaration of martial law and the military occupation of Barillas for 18 days, while troops ransacked homes looking for community leaders. Several people were arrested, and dozens of others fled into hiding. In early April, 2013, Daniel Pedro Mateo, a longtime activist from Santa Eulalia, was kidnapped while en route to Barillas and his body was discovered on April 16 of that year, his corpse, showing clear signs of torture. Soon after his death, people organized a "resistencia pacífica" called Posa Verde blocking the access road leading to the waterfalls where the dam was supposed to be constructed, and burned some of the company's machinery. On September 28, 2013, one of the men who helped set up the resistencia pacífica, Mynor López, was seized by men wearing civilian clothing while he was walking by the church in Barillas, and later whisked away in a military helicopter. The town was again besieged by the military, and in the ensuing civil unrest, several people were injured and one soldier died.
 
Since then, there have been road blockages, rallies, and other peaceful actions by residents who oppose the hydroelectric projects, in over half a dozen municipalities in northern Huehuetenango, along with efforts by the government to "restore order"; they have issued dozens of arrest warrants against community leaders. Things have heated up again in the first part of 2015. On January 19, community leaders from San Mateo Ixtatán were detained by the authorities. Overnight, leaders of the Gobierno Plurinacional met with judges to negotiate the release of the detainees. In the early hours of January 20, shots were fired from a car belonging to the Mayor of Santa Eulalia, Diego Marcos Pedro, wounding two men. One of them, Pascual Basilio Pascual Diego, was wounded quite seriously. Shortly thereafter, a mob of the mayor's supporters attacked some of the volunteer staff of the Q'anjob'al language community radio station, Snuq Jolom Konob, which has reported on the resistance movement, and the Mayor later cut off power to the radio station, forcing it off the air.  In late February, three more community leaders from Barillas — Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan and Arturo Pablo — were arrested (they remain in jail). In mid-March, Pascual Basilio died, and hundreds of people turned out for his funeral in Santa Eulalia on March 17. Two days later, on March 19, hundreds of people again gathered in the town center for the reopening of Radio Snuq Jolom Konob. Even though the authorities continued to oppose the radio station, the directors and staff decided that they had enough support from local residents. During the inaugural ceremony, the Mayor grabbed the microphone and announced that he would only support the radio station re-opening if they selected a new board of directors, got new broadcasters and changed their programming. When one of the representatives of the Ancestral Authorities, Rigoberto Juárez, started to speak, the Mayor ordered the power to be cut off. The mayor's supporters then tried to break up the event, and two journalists were beaten up and several cameras were seized.
 
A few days later, Rigoberto Juárez and another leader from Santa Eulalia, Domingo Mateo, traveled to the capital to file complaints against the municipal authorities, and on March 24, as they were walking along the Sexta Avenida, they were detained by the police, and remain in jail.  That same day, another leader went missing in Barillas -Pascual Pablo Francisco. His body was found on March 27.
 
************************
 
I will forward more information — especially about how you can make donations to help with legal fees and the replacement of the equipment that was seized — as it becomes available.

 

Dr. Lisa Maya Knauer 

Chair, Department of Sociology and Anthropology  

 

Associate Professor of Anthropology

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

2011 Fulbright Scholar

Phone: 508-999-8405
 
Read about my work and experiences in Guatemala:  http://guatebuenaguatemaya.blogspot.com

 


 
3. STATEMENT FROM JOHNS HOPKINS LEADERSHIP ON THE LAWSUIT FILED BY GUATEMALA REGARDING THE STD STUDY
 
From: Paul B. Rothman Sent: 4/1/2015 2:33 PM To: 'recipients@lists.johnshopkins.edu' Subject: Challenges from the past   

Dear Member of the Johns Hopkins Community,

More than 60 years ago, the U.S. government conducted an unconscionable and unethical experiment in Guatemala, in which U.S. government researchers deliberately infected vulnerable citizens of Guatemala with syphilis and other infectious diseases. We feel profound sympathy for the individuals and families impacted by this deplorable study.

When the details of this study came to light, a Presidential Commission determined that the Guatemala Study was funded and conducted by the United States Government. In 2010, the President of the United States, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Health and Human Services apologized to all affected. In 2012, a federal district court concluded that the pleas of victims for relief are more appropriately directed to the political branches of the federal government.

Today, attorneys representing Guatemalan plaintiffs announced that they are suing The Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System, alleging that Johns Hopkins was responsible for the study. The plaintiffs’ essential claim in this case is that prominent Johns Hopkins faculty members’ participation on a government committee that reviewed funding applications was tantamount to conducting the research itself, and therefore that Johns Hopkins should be held liable.

Neither assertion is true.

This was not a Johns Hopkins study. Johns Hopkins did not initiate, pay for, direct or conduct the study in Guatemala. Participation in the review of government research was then and is today separate from being a Johns Hopkins employee, and no nonprofit university or hospital has ever been held liable for a study conducted by the U.S. Government.

As a leading global research university, Johns Hopkins values rigorous and open scrutiny of history, even when it is complex and uncomfortable.

We know that historians have previously linked prominent Johns Hopkins faculty members in various ways to other unethical government research studies in Tuskegee and Terre Haute. Although separate from the Guatemala lawsuit, these studies were all deplorable and all demand reflection upon the broader legacy of unethical research. It is important to confront and learn from the past.  At the same time, we cannot let unfounded allegations go unchallenged. We will defend the institution vigorously in court against legal responsibility for the government’s Guatemala study.

If you would like more information about the university’s position on the lawsuit, we have released a media statement that you can find here, along with information about the Presidential Commission on the research in Guatemala and its findings.

Sincerely,

Ronald J. Daniels

President, The Johns Hopkins University

 

Paul B. Rothman, M.D.

Dean of the Medical Faculty

CEO, Johns Hopkins Medicine

 

Michael J. Klag, M.D., M.P.H. Dean, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 


 
4. PUERTO RICAN SCHOLARS SEEK CONNECTIONS FOR THEIR RESEARCH ON VISUAL IMPAIRMENT IN GUATEMALA
 
We are two professors from University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus and we are filing for a grant.  This grant has two main purposes:  

  1. To trained parents of children with visual impairments, coaches, Physical Education teachers and future teachers on how to include children with visual impairments in recreational physical activities and sports.
  2. To implement an inclusive recreation/sport program for children with visual impairments where people in #1 will practice all the strategies and tools learned in their training.

We chose this population because Guatemala has the highest incidence of visual impairments in youths under 15 years old (40.77%) according to Vision 20/20 (http://www.v2020la.org/Joomla/publicaciones/manuales).  This is a significant amount of children with this type of disability.  Therefore we would like to help this children through the opportunity to be more physically active and more healthy. In order for us to complete the grant (and get it) we need some important links with Guatemala to implement the project.  We would like to know if you want to help us find and create these links in order to make this project a reality. Thanks for your time and hope to hear from you pretty soon,

Margarita Fernández Vivó, Ph.D., C.A.P.E. Directora Interina/Catedrática Departamento de Educación Física Universidad de Puerto Rico- Mayagüez PO Box 9014 Mayagüez, PR 00681-9014

(787) 832-4040 X-2162, 3841

 
5. NEW VOLUME AND PRESENTATION THIS THURSDAY ON VIOLENCE IN GUATEMALA FEATURING MULTIPLE GSN'ERS
 
NO DEJE DE IR A LA PRESENTACIÓN

 

Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226