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GNS MONDAY MAILER DECEMBER 01 2014

Posted by on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 in News, Uncategorized.

THE GSN MEETING AT THE AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION MEETINGS IN WASHINGTON DC WILL BE ON Friday Dec 5 in Marriott Wilson C 8:30 to 10pm. JOIN US FOR BOX WINE AND MORE…..

  1. A FEW LINKS
  2. SOME GUATEMALA RELATED PAPERS AT THE AAA MEETINGS
  3. CHIXOY DAM REPARATIONS DEAL SIGNED
  4. GSN’ERS SWEEP NECLAS BOOK AWARDS
  5. SOCIETY FOR THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF WORK ANNOUNCES BOOK PRIZE
  6. NEW PUBLICATION ON CLIMATE IN GUATEMALA
  7. EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED IN MINNESOTA
  8. LECTURE ON JORGE UBICO THIS Thursday AT THE CASA POPENOE
  9. OSEA SUMMER FIELD PROGRAMS IN YUCATAN



  1. A FEW LINKS
    1. NPR INTERVIEW WITH CLAUDIA PAZ Y PAZ http://www.npr.org/2014/11/20/365390898/after-fighting-crime-ex-guatemala-attorney-general-moves-to-u-s
    2. WHAT “FREE TRADE” HAS DONE TO THE AMERICAS http://www.thenation.com/blog/191321/what-free-trade-has-done-central-america

2. SOME GUATEMALA RELATED PAPERS AT THE AAA MEETINGS

My talk focuses on Guatemala: it's called “Foreign Women Make Them Strong”: How Violence Shapes Voluntouring in Guatemala 
Rebecca Lee Nelson (University of Connecticut) and it's in the panel STRUCTURING AND SHAPING TOURISM: RECONSIDERING THE ROLE OF "IMPACTS"

Saturday, December 6, 2014: 9:00 AM-10:45 AM
Delaware Suite B (Marriott Wardman Park).


Saturday, December 6, 2014: 11:00 AM-12:45 PM

 

Organizers:  Elizabeth J Brummel (University of Chicago) and Owen Nathaniel Kohl (University of Chicago)
Chairs:  Elizabeth J Brummel (University of Chicago)
Discussants:  Mary Bucholtz (University of California, Santa Barbara)


 

12:00 PM
 

12:15 PM
 
Discussant 

Mary Bucholtz (University of California, Santa Barbara)



3. CHIXOY DAM REPARATIONS DEAL SIGNED

Dear Friends,
I am writing to pass along the link to this article: "An Historic Agreement in Guatemala – Inside the Chixoy Dam Reparations Deal"  
Published today on CounterPunch, this commentary presents information on the historic agreement to provide reparation for human rights abuses and other social, economic and environmental damages accompanying the construction of the Chixoy Dam and hydroelectric generation facility – an internationally-financed project built during Guatemala's most intense period of state-sponsored violence against a civilian indigenous population. 
In addition to announcing reparation details and providing some key document links, the article gives some of the detail on the political process required to bring a case to "court" in a situation where there is no viable national mechanism and IFI mechanisms reject standing, and to the related ramifications of the Chixoy development case for IFI accountability … 

For more information on the history, research methods, role of science and human rights (integrated research, methods, and role of UN Special Rapporteurs, professional and civil society organizations) in conducting a rights-protective forensic investigation into the development process and related human rights abuses, see links embedded in this CounterPunch article or posted on the CPE website.   

Many of the folks receiving this note helped with this struggle by 
–  providing time, historical documents, notes and imagery, contriuting to the field work and analysis, providing funds, and other support that allowed an independent forensic analysis of events and consequences
–  providing professional organization peer review and delegate status
–  helping share the case history in ways that educated and generated political will … and more.

My deepest and sincere appreciation.

yours truly,

Barbara Rose Johnston
Senior Research Fellow, Center for Political Ecology




4. GSN’ERS SWEEP NECLAS BOOK AWARDS

NECLAS Prize Citations for 2014

 

MARYSA NAVARRO BEST BOOK PRIZE

Prize Committee: Walter E. Little, Chair (SUNY Albany), Amy Chazkel (City University of New York, Queens College and Graduate Center), Katherine Hite (Vassar College)

 

Winner: Levenson, Deborah Adiós Niño, The Gangs of Guatemala City and the Politics of Death (Duke University Press, 2013).

 

Levenson's deep understanding of Guatemala's history, especially of Guatemala City and of labor organizations, comes through many years of experience in the very problem-filled neighborhoods she writes about. Adiós Niño goes beyond an historical analysis of the causes of gang violence and avoids falling into reductionist and sensationalistic tropes of gang members' identities and behaviors to generate fear or pass moralistic opinions. Instead, Levenson humanizes the gang members and families that are described in the book. Without shirking from addressing the truly horrible crimes committed by the gangs, she shows the economic, political, and social conditions that fomented them and continue to incubate future gang members. Using interviews, conversations, and oral histories, she provides an empathic portrait of gang members, their families, and friends to present a nuanced understanding of Guatemala City life inside and outside of gang life. She illustrates how gang members have complex multifaceted identities that straddle legal and illegal, as they participate in informal, formal, and underworld economies and politics. What makes Levenson's book so convincing and her so successful at describing gang members and their lives is the way she sews together her own personal experiences with that of a toolbox of mixed methods. This information is then interpreted using a diverse set of analytical tools to explain what is happening. Adiós, Niño does not fall easily within one academic genre but bridges several, history, politics, ethnographic, sociology, while remaining elegantly and clearly written.

 

 

Honorable Mention: David Carey's book, I Ask for Justice: Maya Women, Dictators, and Crime in Guatemala, 1898–1944 (University of Texas Press, 2013) is a deeply researched and convincingly argued piece of scholarship. This rich historical study of crime, gender and the state sheds more than insights into legal processes under dictatorships, it provides intimate portraits of life Mayas–conflict within and between families, making due under the crushing conditions of poverty, and an economic and political system stacked against them.



5. SOCIETY FOR THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF WORK ANNOUNCES BOOK PRIZE

The Society for the Anthropology of Work congratulates Karen Tranberg Hansen, Walter Little, and B. Lynne Milgram, whose recent edited volume from SAR Press, Street Economies in the Urban Global South (2013) for winning the 2014 SAW Book Prize. The prize will be presented at SAW's annual business meeting on Friday, December 5.



6. NEW PUBLICATION ON CLIMATE IN GUATEMALA


Anchukaitis, K.J., Taylor, M.J., Leland, C., Pons, D., Martin-Fernandez, J., Castellanos, E. 2014. Treering reconstructed dry season rainfall in Guatemala, Climate Dynamics,  (DOI) 10.1007/s00382-014-2407-y




7.  EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED IN MINNESOTA

Emerson Beishline <ebeishline@gmail.com>
My colleagues and I have a pro bono immigration case through The Advocates for Human Rights and were wondering if you knew of any experts on Guatemala in or near Minnesota?

Thanks, 


Emerson Beishline
Attorney at law
480.332.6599(m)
LinkedIn



8. LECTURE ON JORGE UBICO THIS Thursday AT THE CASA POPENOE




— 

Lilian Alvarado
Exploraciones sobre la Historia

Universidad Francisco Marroquín



9. OSEA SUMMER FIELD PROGRAMS IN YUCATAN

osea Open School of Ethnography and Anthropology

Field Study Abroad 2015

See OSEA ethnography vids & photos and join group on FB

All Programs Are 6 Weeks July 21 To August 1, 2015

 OSEA provides field study abroad programs in Maya Yucatán. Ethnography Field School provides experiential hands on training in learning ethnographic methods in contexts of community action research and service learning.

 

Ideal for any undergraduate seeking unique educational and international experience to enter med school, continue in a graduate program, or pursue a career in non-profit community work.

 

Ethnography Field School 6 weeks 8 credits

with focus on Sustainable Community Tourism Development; Digital Anthropology, Youth Culture and Cultural Change; Visual Ethnography; Heritage, Service Learning; Maya Health and Health and Healing; New Maya Subjectivities

 

Teach English Community Service Learning, 8 credits

 

Maya Language Immersion with individuated learning, 8 credits

 

OSEA courses are accredited through partner institution

the Facultad de Antropología of the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán

 

Visit www.osea-cite.org

contact@osea-cite.org


_________________
Quetzil E. Castañeda 
​Lecturer,  

​CLACS, IUB

​​

 Co 

​​

 nvener, Anthropology of Tourism Interest Group, ATIG AAA

Councilor, Society  

​​

 Latin American & Caribbean Anthropology, SLACA 


Director and Associate Professor, OSEA
812.669.1369 voice message
Skype "quetzil"




Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226