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Digital Humanities Resources for Graduate Students

Forthcoming: Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

The forthcoming Vanderbilt certificate in DH will emphasize practical experience with large- and small-scale digital projects (Practicum I and II), critical frameworks for understanding the philosophies, controversies, and social situatedness of digital humanities work (Critical Digital Humanities), and participation in a community of interest (reflected in the event attendance and graduate working group requirements). Unlike other digital humanities graduate programs, which involve only coursework, the Vanderbilt certificate in digital humanities directs students to engage with the area of digital humanities through a wide variety of channels available to the Vanderbilt community.

Preview the proposed course sequencing and application details.

For more information, contact Mickey Casad.

Professional Organizations

ACH (The Association for Computers and the Humanities)
The ACH is the largest professional society for the digital humanities in the U.S. They support and disseminate research and cultivate a vibrant professional community through conferences, publications, and outreach activities. To become a member, visit their website.

ADHO (Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations)
An international umbrella for DH organizations. To learn more, read the ADHO’s mission statement.

HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory)
HASTAC is an interdisciplinary community of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists from over 400+ affiliate organizations including Vanderbilt University. Check out their website to become a member, read about the annual conference, look for DH tools, share ideas, and learn about HASTAC initiatives.

For more information about HASTAC at Vanderbilt, please contact our center.

Interassociation Caucuses
Many discipline-specific organizations like the American Historical Association, American Library Association, and the Modern Language Association have working groups or committees dedicated to DH-based research. Check out the links below or the homepage of your professional society to find out more.

Funding

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The Mellon Foundation is a key provider of academic funding at the institutional level. While students cannot apply to receive individual support directly from the Foundation, keep an eye out for opportunities offered by the Foundation’s many campus partners. For example, Vanderbilt graduate students are eligible to apply for year-long Mellon Fellowships with the University’s Center for Digital Humanities.

CLIR (Council on Library Information and Resources)
Important CLIR funding opportunities include dissertation research grants and postdoctoral fellowships. The latter are usually hosted at libraries and academic institutions around the country, and the majority require DH skills.

HASTAC Scholars

Vanderbilt HASTAC Scholars earn a $500 stipend and funding for a DH-related conference of their choice, while contributing to a DH project with a sponsoring center on campus.  To learn more, check out the HASTAC at Vanderbilt page.

NEH Office of Digital Humanities
From funded summer institutes to research grants, start-up support to digital publishing awards, the NEH is an important intellectual and financial resources for digital humanists. To learn more, check out their DH page.

HASTAC Scholars

HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) is an “interdisciplinary community of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists changing the way we teach and learn” (https://www.hastac.org/about-hastac).  This global network of digitally-minded scholars has over 16,000 members across 400+ affiliate organizations.  Vanderbilt is one of those affiliates, and the HASTAC Scholars program at Vanderbilt is administered through the DH Center.

The HASTAC Scholars program at Vanderbilt provides an opportunity for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences to develop their DH skills through work with a faculty mentor at a partnering campus center.  Each Scholar receives a $500 stipend, as well as funding for a DH-related conference of their choice (HASTAC’s annual conference is one possible option:  https://www.hastac.org/hastac-conferences).  Scholars are eligible to participate for a second year if they wish and if their faculty mentor agrees.  In 2020-2021, we had 14 HASTAC Scholars across 9 campus partners.  

Past sponsoring campus centers have included…

  • Robert Penn Warren Center
  • Center for Second Language Studies
  • Computational Thinking and Learning
  • Program in American Studies
  • Center for Digital Humanities
  • Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries
  • Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy
  • Nashville Sites Project
  • Center for Teaching

If you are interested in becoming a HASTAC Scholar, stay tuned for the call for applications–coming this fall!  If you are interested in becoming a sponsoring campus center, contact the DH Center.

2020-2021 HASTAC Scholars

Bryant White, Center for Second Language Studies

Steven Rodriguez, Center for Second Language Studies

Dasom Lee, Computational Thinking and Learning

Ashley Kim, Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy

Tita Peterson, Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy

Meghan McGinley, Center for Digital Humanities

Taryn Marashi, Center for Digital Humanities

Maren Loveland, Department of American Studies

Ricky Sakamoto-Pugh, Department of American Studies

Danielle Wilfong, Robert Penn Warren Center

Kayla Anderson, Nashville Sites

Rachel Hanebutt, Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries

Shatavia Wynn, Center for Teaching

George Schmidt, Center for Teaching