OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE AT VANDERBILT

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt University supports lifelong learning. It is an organization that provides older adults with educational programs, stimulating tours and trips, and a variety of social events. The program reflects the high academic standards espoused by the University on all levels. By offering non-credit courses, the programs allow students to benefit from the stimulus of lectures and discussions in an informal and relaxed environment. The student body is a cohesive group that projects a true sense of community, always welcoming new members.

The Division of Public Affairs sponsors the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt.

Membership and Dues 2011/12

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2011 Annual Membership Dues only $10
(September, 2011 – August, 2012)

Membership in the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt is open to all adults interested in continuing to learn. Benefits include:
Opportunity to attend classes
Opportunity to participate in all special events including day trips
Monthly “Lunch and Learn” sessions
Staying informed about other Vanderbilt activities and educational opportunities
Access to Vanderbilt University libraries
10% discount at Rand Bookstore
Discounted season tickets to Vanderbilt’s women’s basketball and baseball

Scholarship assistance is available.

Please direct inquiries to:

Norma Clippard, Director
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt
Phone: 322-5569; Cell: 364-1331; Fax: 343-1145
E-mail: norma.clippard@vanderbilt.edu

or

Nancy Adams, President
873 StirrupDrive
Nashville, TN 37221
Phone: (615) 662-1876
E-mail: nca13nov@aol.com

For further information, visit our web site at www.vanderbilt.edu/cngr/olli

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt is updating its mailing list. Please check your name and address and call 343-0700 with any corrections. Also, if you are no longer interested in receiving our brochure, please call and we will remove you from our mailing list.

Lunch & Learn

Members meet once a month for lunch with a speaker. A box lunch may be purchased, or members may bring their own lunches. Annual membership and reservations are required to attend. Please call 343-0700 for reservations.

Monday, January 23, 2012
St. George’s Episcopal Church, 4715 Harding Road
Jonah Rabinowitz, Director of the W.O. Smith Music School

Monday, February 13, 2012
St. George’s Episcopal Church, 4715 Harding Road
John Seigenthaler, Sr., Founder, First Amendment Center

Monday, March 19, 2012
St. George’s Episcopal Church, 4715 Harding Road
Ann Patchett, bestselling author and owner, Parnassus Books

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt
Spring 2012 Schedule of Classes

March 12 – April 30, 2012

Mondays

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March 12, 19, 26;
April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Location: St. George’s Episcopal Church, 4715 Harding Road
Complimentary parking is available at the church on the Belle Meade Blvd. side.

9:30 – 10:45a.m.
Great Decisions 2012: Foreign Policy Discussion Group
Discussion Leaders: Ben Adams, Member, and Mary Pat Silveira, Member and Retired UN Official

This class will discuss timely issues using the Great Decisions 2012 briefing book of the Foreign Policy Association. Topics include Middle East realignment; promoting democracy; Mexico; cybersecurity; exit from Afghanistan and Iraq; state of the oceans; Indonesia; and energy geopolitics.

Cost of the briefing book is $20 and can be paid with your registration.

Please note: Great Decisions 2012 will have eight sessions and follow the eight chapters in the briefing book, and will have two sections (covering the same material) on Mondays and Fridays.

Mondays
March 12, 19, 26;
April 2, 9, 16

Location: St. George’s Episcopal Church, 4715 Harding Road
Complimentary parking is available at the church on the Belle Meade Blvd. side.

11:00-12:15p.m.
Healthcare Reform Crisis: Problems and Possibilities

Gottlieb C. Friesinger, Professor of Medicine, Emeritus, Vanderbilt University Medical School
R. Lawrence Van Horn, Associate Professor of Economics and Management, Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University
Malcolm Getz, Associate Professor of Economics, Vanderbilt University
Congressman Jim Cooper, U.S. Representative; 5th District of Tennessee

There’s broad agreement that the healthcare system needs reform. It is inefficient, difficult for patients to maneuver, extraordinarily expensive, does not provide care for all citizens and quality is variable. Healthcare reform is proving to be extremely difficult politically and failure to act threatens the nation’s entire economy. The objectives of the course are to provide historical background, define elements essential for reform, and describe financial and political possibilities and obstacles. The first three sessions will provide historical background, define some elements responsible for the crisis and address changes essential to achieve reform (from the physicians’ perspective) and discuss comparative healthcare delivery systems using T.R. Reid’s book The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care. Vanderbilt health economists, R. Lawrence Van Horn and Malcolm Getz, will provide insights into understanding and resolving this extraordinary national financial emergency. Congressman Jim Cooper will give the final session providing his political perspective on this topic on which he has long been a national thought leader.

Tuesdays

March 13, 20, 27;
April 3, 10, 17
Location:
Belle Meade United Methodist Church, 121 Davidson Road
Complimentary parking is available at the church.

9:30 – 10:45a.m.
Music Appreciation
Mitchell Korn, Professor, Blair School of Music, Vanderbilt
Robert Bond, music educator, musician and composer

We will be discussing how to listen to symphonic and classical music through: experiences with consistent and engaging composers’ ideas and challenges; the role of social, political and personal factors in the sounds and structures of symphonies and concertos; and the influences of world music, global instruments and new technologies in symphonic music. The mission of this class is giving the tools to participants to listen to any piece of symphonic/classical, old or new, and truly enjoy it! Come join Mitchell Korn and Robert Bond, music educators, musicians and composers, in a series of participatory lecture workshops that will provide you with enjoyable and practical access to music beyond the curtain.

11:00-12:15p.m.
Medical Advances II

This course will be presented by faculty of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center and will be a continuation of the series presented in the winter term. We will again focus on what the future of medicine holds. This series of lectures introduces medical and surgical treatments that are changing lives today and a preview of the discoveries that are still works in progress at Vanderbilt. A sampling of the lectures will include diabetes, depression in older adults, eye health/macular degeneration, arthritis/joint replacement, sleep disorders as well as the discovery of new drugs.

Wednesdays

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March 14, 21, 28;
April 4, 11, 18
Location: The Commons Center

Parking: Parking directions will be sent with registration acknowledgment.

9:30 – 10:45a.m.
How We Kill Innovation (Without Even Trying)
David A. Owens, Professor of Management and Innovation, Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University

While society often gives lip service to promoting innovation and creative ideas, we all too often sabotage “outside the box” thinking. In this course we will explore and discuss the six dominant types of constraints (individual, group, organizational, industry, societal, or technological) that can keep creative new ideas from being formulated, developed into new products and services, and adopted. Based on the professor's book, Creative People Must Be Stopped, this class organizes the six types of innovation killers into a conceptual framework that demystifies what innovation is, how it happens, and how we inadvertently stop it in ourselves, in our groups, and in our organizations. The framework presented in this course has been used to diagnose the primary causes of innovation failure within hundreds of organizations that have gone on to develop strategies that foster innovation rather than stopping it in its tracks. Each class session will feature a number of exercises and assessments to be experienced, discussed and debated. To this end, there is an expectation that participants will actively engage with the material and each other, with a goal of helping us all become smarter about innovation (and more creative).

11:00-12:15p.m
Living in Paris under Napoleon III
Robert Barsky, Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor (2011-2012), Department of French and Italian, Vanderbilt University

What do the invention of haute couture fashion, the creation of the world’s first department store (and such ideas as sales and fixed pricing for goods), the first laws against ‘eau de vie’ alcohols in France, the modernization of Paris, and vivid descriptions (deemed pornographic) of violence and lust have in common? They all occurred under Napoleon III, in Paris. Napoleon III was elected to the Presidency of France in 1848, but he initiated a coup d'état in 1851 and declared himself ‘Emperor of the Third Republic’, a position he held until 1870 when he was overthrown after his ‘debacle’ with Prussia. In this course, we’ll talk about life in Paris under Napoleon III, through the passionate eyes of characters, -- fictional and real — who were assembled by the great French writer Émile Zola. The course materials will all be in English, but the stories we will read and talk about will all be decidedly Parisian, and more than a little bit titillating.

Thursdays

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March 15, 22, 29;
April 5, 12, 19
Location
: The Commons Center
Parking: Parking directions will be sent with registration acknowledgment.

9:30 – 10:45a.m.
Protests and Social Change

John Seigenthaler, Founder, First Amendment Center
Gary Gerstle, James G. Stahlman Professor of American History, Vanderbilt University
Carole Bucy, Professor of History, Volunteer State Community College
George Barrett, Attorney
Steve Cobb, Attorney and former Legislator
Mike Murphy, former Legislator
Steven Tepper, Professor of Sociology, Vanderbilt University

Today, protests seem to be a way of life. Have you ever wondered if protests really accomplish anything? During the past 150 years, protests have shifted from those focused on economic inequality to those emphasizing racial, gender, and sexual discrimination. Where are they headed now? An exciting group of professors and community leaders will lead you through this course. The schedule is as follows:

March 15
John Seigenthaler Civil Rights of the 60's
March 22
Gary Gerstle Evaluating 150 Years of Protest in America
March 29
Carole Bucy The Women's Movement
April 5
George Barrett Labor Protests and Unions
April 12
Steve Cobb and Mike Murphy Anti-war Protests of the 60’s
April 19
Steven Tepper The Sociology of Protests and the Tea Party

11:00-12:15p.m.
Apocalypse Now? Modern Maya and Ancient Prophecies
Mareike Sattler, Senior Lecturer, Anthropology Department, Vanderbilt University
Avery Dickins de Girón, Assistant Director, Center for Latin American Studies, Vanderbilt University

This seminar introduces students to Maya culture from ancient to modern times. Maya people and culture have been featured prominently in popular culture over the last few years, and especially now, as the media have played up ancient Maya prophecies that supposedly predict an apocalyptic end of the world in December 2012. What exactly did the Ancient Maya say about this event? How do modern Maya live today? Guest speakers will be invited to introduce students to topics ranging from archaeology and hieroglyphic writing systems to modern Maya languages and political economies in Guatemala. Vanderbilt’s numerous projects in health care, language studies, and community development in Guatemala will also be discussed. By the end of this course students will have learned how to read Maya hieroglyphs, how to calculate time in the Maya calendar, and how to greet someone in the K’iche’ Mayan language!

Fridays

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March 16, 23, 30; April 6, 13, 20, 27; May 4
Location:
The Heritage at Brentwood, 900 Heritage Way
Parking: Parking directions will be sent with registration acknowledgment.

9:30 – 10:45a.m.
Great Decisions 2012: Foreign Policy Discussion Group
Discussion Leaders: Ben Adams, Member, and Mary Pat Silveira, Member and Retired UN Official

This class will discuss timely issues using the Great Decisions 2012 briefing book of the Foreign Policy Association. Topics include Middle East realignment; promoting democracy; Mexico; cybersecurity; exit from Afghanistan and Iraq; state of the oceans; Indonesia; and energy geopolitics.

Cost of the briefing book is $20 and can be paid with your registration.

Please note: Great Decisions 2012 will have eight sessions and follow the eight chapters in the briefing book, and will have two sections (covering the same material) on Mondays and Fridays.

Fridays
March 16, 23, 30;
April 6, 13, 20
Location:
The Heritage at Brentwood, 900 Heritage Way

11:00 – 12:15p.m.
The Port William Stories of Wendell Berr
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Elaine Goleski, teacher and former staff member, Jean and Alexander Heard Library

Wendell Berry, poet, essayist, farmer, activist, and novelist, has written a series of novels and short stories about Port William, Kentucky. These interlinked stories follow generations of the Catletts, the Feltners, the Coulters, long-time residents of this agricultural community, as well as introduce newcomers to the region. In this course, we will read two short novels, Hannah Coulter and A World Lost, and one collection of short stories, Fidelity: Five Stories. Berry refers to the people in this fictional town as part of the “Port William Membership,” and our discussions will examine ideas of membership, remembrance, community, tradition, loss, and continuity.

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Friends of OLLI at Vanderbilt

It is our hope at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Vanderbilt that this program continues to grow and enrich the lives of adults for many years to come. Monetary contributions are part of what ensures that the program will last and that it will continue to be affordable and accessible to all. Your gift to OLLI at Vanderbilt will enhance the lifelong learning experience not only for those currently involved in the program but for future generations as well. You can support lifelong learning by completing the form below or you may go online at www.vanderbilt.edu/giveonline, when form asks for indication of the area you would like to support, choose “other” at the bottom, then write in Osher Lifelong Learning in the “allocation description” box.

Thank you! Your contribution is truly appreciated. Gifts are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. A receipt will be mailed to you.

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TO REGISTER

For registration or further information, please call 343-0700 or e-mail norma.clippard@vanderbilt.edu.

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