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Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Courses

AMER 1002: Introduction to American Studies: An interdisciplinary approach to American culture, character, and life.

TR 9:35-10:50a Alexander Jacobs

 AMER 1002W: Introduction to American Studies: An interdisciplinary approach to American culture, character, and life.

Section 1: MW 1:10-2:25 Sarah Gorman

       Section 2: MWF 1:10-2 Susan Kevra

AMER 1700: Writing for Social Change: Practice of narrative, nonfiction writing for social change. History of American investigative journalism and scholarship. Interviewing, research, narrative and revision skills.

       MW 8:45-10a Paul Kramer

AMER 2500: American Cultures: Past, Present, Future: Practice of narrative, nonfiction writing for social change. History of American investigative journalism and scholarship. Interviewing, research, narrative and revision skills.

       Section 1: TR 11-12:15 Alexander Jacobs

       Section 2: TR 2:35-3:50 Alexander Jacobs

AMER 3200: Global Perspectives on the U.S.: Contemporary and historical views of the U.S. political and cultural presence in the world; comparative nationalisms; emphasis on points of view outside the U.S.

       MW 8:45-10a Gabriel Torres Colón

AMER 3890: Topics in American Studies – Critical Disability Studies: In this course we will read literature from critical disability studies, an interdisciplinary field that employs methodologies from historical, literary, geographic, emancipatory, philosophical, feminist, and anti-racist perspectives-to name a few. The “critical” element in critical disability studies is important because these works often take on a sharp and questioning eye toward the existing infrastructure, the built world, and the cultural imaginary that develops and sustains ableism in the US. Students will complete research projects that synthesize knowledge and methods from more than one discipline throughout the semester.

MW 4-5:15p Sarah Gorman

AMER 3890: Topics in American Studies – Politics, Passion, & Persuasion:Political rhetoric is all around us. When we read or watch the news, talk to friends or engage in social media, we are confronted with people trying to persuade us to support specific causes or candidates, identify in particular ways or to buy certain goods or services. What are the political ramifications of our being placed in this near constant stream of rhetoric? How does the rhetoric in which we find ourselves immersed shape who it is we are and what is possible for our futures? With examples from the US and abroad, this course explores the meaning, role and potential of persuasive, passionate and creative speech in contemporary democracies.

MW 2:10-3:25p Simon Lambek

AMER 4960: Senior Project

TR 9:35-10:50 Sarah Igo


There are many courses in other departments that count for American Studies credit. When searching for courses on YES, students should do an advanced search, open the “Class Attributes” drop down menu, and check the option, “Eligible for American Studies Major.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Courses not listed as eligible for American Studies credit may count towards a student’s major or minor, but approval from the DUS is needed before taking the course.