Home » Archive by category 'Features' (Page 2)

Features

Photo by John Russell

Healing Through Literature

by Leslie Hill Christine Shih cared for a range of patients – adolescents in a student health center, premature babies, elderly eye patients and adults with leukemia – then turned her attention to a different set: the Elizabeth Darcys and Fanny Prices populating the Regency-period English countryside in classic novels by Jane Austen. The Setting…

Posted in Fall 2011, Features, Issue | Tags: ,


Christine Shih’s Reading List

For a true picture of the Borderline personality Lady Susan Jane Austen Mansfield Park Jane Austen Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte The Custom of the Country Edith Wharton Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll Jane of Lantern Hill L.M. Montgomery The Bell Jar Sylvia Plath Till We Have Faces C.S. Lewis Look Homeward,…

Posted in Fall 2011, Features, Issue |


profile_lg

Above and Beyond

Doctorally-Prepared Nurses Making an Impact Anyone in the world of nursing knows it is a continuously evolving profession.  As patient needs become more complex and health care reform overhauls take shape, who in the profession will lead the way?  Many believe the answer is:  doctorally-prepared nurses. The problem is that fewer than 1 percent of…

Posted in Fall 2011, Features, Issue | Tags: ,


rewrite-students-learn

Rewriting How Nursing Students Learn

by Leslie Hill Everything in health care is constantly evolving, including how students are taught and faculty are trained.  From the virtual world of Second Life to a comprehensive new approach to interprofessional learning, we’re erasing the old chalkboard and rewriting nursing education for the 21st Century. A New World The sweatpants-clad nursing student winds…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 | Tags: ,


question-answerLarge

Q and A

by Kathy Rivers Tonia Moore-Davis, MSN, CNM, manages the VUSN nurse-midwifery practice at two sites in Nashville with a daily staff of 10 serving clients across a wide cultural, educational and socio-economic spectrum. The faculty practice serves as an incubator for nurse-midwifery students, consistently wins national awards, and delivered more than 1,000 babies last year….

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 | Tags: ,


Major Access Provisions

According to a Congressional Budget Office estimate, under the provisions of the Accountable Care Act some 32 million more Americans will acquire health coverage by 2019. • Minimum Medicaid eligibility will expand to 133 percent of the poverty level, increasing the rolls by an estimated 19 million people (current Medicaid enrollment is 47 million). •…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 |


Major Cost and Quality Provisions

The law seeks innovation in care delivery. • CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services) will establish an innovation center to test new models of payment and care delivery. The law leaves the agency free to adopt any solutions found to lower costs and preserve or improve health care quality. • Medicare is freed to…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 |


flagLarge

Health Care Reform

by Paul Govern Health care reform aims to transform U.S. health care delivery into a more preventive, coordinated posture. While the law is still hotly contested throughout the country, most agree that whatever happens, it will usher in a new era of opportunity for nurses. Under the provisions of the law, experts believe there will…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 | Tags:


VUSN Technology

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing embraces technology to enhance the learning experience for today’s students and tomorrow’s practitioners and researchers. Blackboard – A course management system for all students at Vanderbilt University.  Blackboard is where students log in to classes, submit assignments, learn about class announcements, take tests and even enter into live discussions.  On…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2011 | Tags:


Hey Florence!

Vanderbilt University Medical Center hosted a series of  performances of “Hey Florence!” this year, a musical about the everyday lives of nurses, starring active-duty nurses from Vanderbilt, “Hey Florence! received a standing ovation at each performance,” said Donna Glassford, director of Cultural Enrichment and producer of “Hey Florence!” “A lot of people were amazed that nurses could…

Posted in Fall 2010, Features, Issue |


Florence Nightingale Pledge

This modified “Hippocratic Oath” was composed in 1893 by Lystra E. Gretter and a Committee for the Farrand Training School for Nurses, Detroit. It was called the Florence Nightingale Pledge as a token of esteem for the founder of modern nursing. I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly, to pass…

Posted in Fall 2010, Features, Issue |


florence_nurseflash

What would Florence think?

If you ask any nurse about Florence Nightingale, most will be able to say that she was the founder of modern nursing. And for many that is about the extent of their knowledge. But this woman, who served as a catalyst for changing the view of health care and nursing, was more than the lady with the lamp known for tirelessly tending to injured soldiers in the dark of the night.

Posted in Fall 2010, Features, Issue | Tags:


leaves_nurseflash

Leading the Way

by Leslie Hill The career path of most nurses after graduation is like a well-marked highway. This way to a large hospital unit. That way to a small private clinic. Turn here for pediatrics. Straight ahead for more education. But a few nurses choose to veer off onto a career path that’s more like a…

Posted in Fall 2010, Features, Issue |


maryjo_nurseflash

Q+A: An Interview with Mary Jo Gilmer

Mary Jo Gilmer, Ph.D., M.B.A., A.P.R.N., is a pioneer in the field of pediatric palliative care, helping establish the palliative care program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, researching ways to improve care for those with life-threatening or life-limiting illnesses, and teaching a new generation of students that there is always some way to help.

Posted in Fall 2010, Features, Issue | Tags:


Tammy Hakim

Opening a New Door

When one door closes, a different door may open – at least that’s what three Vanderbilt University School of Nursing graduates think. These resilient individuals prove that while adversity cannot be avoided, it can reshape our purpose. Re-defining her life In 2006 Tammy Hakim moved to Franklin, Tenn., from Michigan with her family. Two months…

Posted in Features, Issue, Spring 2010 | Tags:


There's a whole new opportunity driven by biomedical and nursing informatics to apply advance technology to dietetics research, teaching and practice

Q + A: An Interview with Heidi Silver

Program Director Heidi Silver, Ph.D., R.D., has taken on many challenge throughout her 20-plus-year career in dietetics and nutrition. Now she is working with the School of Nursing to launch a master’s program that will educate a new generation of advanced practice dietitians and move the profession forward in meaningful ways. What do you want…

Posted in Features, Spring 2010 | Tags:


A Look Inside Nurses for Newborns

Nurses for Newborns is a natural fit when it comes to collaborating with the Better Birth Outcomes study. This separate, non-profit nurse visitation program for at-risk mothers and babies is important in preventing infant mortality. “The first 18 months is most critical for a child,” said Vicki Beaver, M.S.N., R.N., executive director of Nurse for…

Posted in Features, Spring 2010 |


Tracey Stamper adores son Christopher. Her fears for his health have been replaced by dreams for his future.

The Measure of Life

After her son Christopher was born, Tracey Stamper could recite all the numbers: Jan. 12, 2010; 5:27 p.m., 7 pounds, 14 ounces; 19 ¼ inches. But to her, the most important number was his gestational age.  Her healthy baby boy defied the odds and was born at 39 weeks, nearly full-term. Stamper is just one…

Posted in Features, Spring 2010 | Tags:



VUSN Tweets

Facebook