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Student Handbook 2016/2017 
Second Edition

The Vanderbilt Community Creed

The Community Creed is a student-initiated statement of the values to which the Vanderbilt community aspires. Individuals who join this community embark on a lifelong journey toward greater intellectual enlightenment and personal growth. By fostering the Creed’s principles, we preserve the University’s enduring tradition of excellence, united by a common set of values.

SCHOLARSHIP is the pursuit of knowledge in an environment of academic freedom. Members of our community engage in a partnership of learning in which the exploration of ideas is encouraged and protected.

HONESTY is a commitment to refrain from lying, cheating, and stealing. Recognizing that dishonesty undermines community trust, stifles the spirit of scholarship, and threatens a safe environment, we expect ourselves to be truthful in academic endeavors, in relationships with others, and in pursuit of personal development.

CIVILITY is the genuine respect for the rights of others. We value constructive disagreement and are mindful of the potential impact of our words and actions.

ACCOUNTABILITY is taking responsibility for our actions and their consequences. We accept the duty to actively participate in the decisions that affect our academic and personal lives, and we honor our commitments to ourselves and to others.

CARING is the concern for the well-being and dignity of others. We are dedicated to supporting one another within our community. We make a lifelong commitment to channeling service, knowledge, and experience toward the betterment of humanity.

DISCOVERY is the exploration of the wonders of self in relation to a larger world. We embrace the opportunity to take risks, challenge assumptions, and understand disparate experiences at Vanderbilt and beyond.

CELEBRATION is the active appreciation of Vanderbilt University’s tradition of excellence. We support the endeavors and recognize the achievements of our community members. In celebrating the expressions of our differences, we delight in the spirit that unites individuals throughout our community.

We pledge to foster the values set forth in the Vanderbilt Community Creed and confront behavior that may weaken the spirit of our community.

Introduction

Vanderbilt’s mission includes educating its students in all respects: intellectually, socially, ethically, spiritually, and emotionally.  This mission is evident in much that we do and in our strategic vision that builds on Vanderbilt’s unique strengths.  The University’s residential community of students, faculty, and staff is one that educates the whole person.  Its commitment to a diverse, civil, collegial, small-class environment demonstrates that at Vanderbilt, faculty, students, and staff work as intellectual partners, and that mentoring and support always accompany academic engagement.  We succeed only if our University is engaged in all elements of the development of the human potential in each of us.

What students may expect of Vanderbilt is articulated in the University’s mission statement, in the catalogs of the colleges and schools, in Equal Opportunity statement, and in the Statement of Principles found in the Faculty Manual.

What students may expect of each other, and the principles that form the basis of what the University expects of students, are articulated in the Community Creed, Vanderbilt’s social honor code. The Student Handbook is designed to acquaint students with the specifics of the standards expected of them as members of University community. The policies and regulations delineated in the handbook apply to all students enrolled at Vanderbilt.

“Vanderbilt University is committed to principles of equal opportunity and affirmative action.” An extension of this commitment is creating a community that is welcoming and inclusive to individuals of all gender identities and expressions. One measure of this extension is using they to refer to a single individual.

To this end, the Student Handbook standard for third-person personal pronouns—when their use cannot be eliminated entirely—is to state he/she/they, his/her/their, or him/her/them (as required by the context) where formerly he or she, or, his or her, etc., were used. The University also recognizes that students may use other pronouns and is committed to using those pronouns in proceedings governed by the Student Handbook.

Note:

The University makes the handbook available to students via the World Wide Web (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/student_handbook). It is the student’s responsibility to become aware of its contents. Ignorance of a policy or regulation will not be considered an excuse for failure to observe it.

Members of the University enjoy the rights and privileges associated with their status and are bound by the laws of the surrounding community. Student status does not protect a Vanderbilt student from arrest or prosecution for violation of local, state, or federal laws. A student who violates certain regulations can be held accountable by the public courts as well as by the University. A student’s standing before the courts in and of itself, however, does not necessarily affect his/her/their standing within the University at any time.

The information provided, and the regulations and policies articulated in The Student Handbook are not intended to be all-inclusive and do not constitute a contract. The University reserves the right at any time to add to, modify, or revoke any of its regulations and policies, including those in the handbook, without notice.

Chapter 1: University Policies and Regulations

Address and Name Change / Aerial Devices, “Unmanned” (Drones) / Alcohol: See Chapter 6 / Athletics, Student / Complaint and Grievance Procedures / Communications, Official UniversityComputer Privileges and Responsibilities / Conduct: See Chapter 3, “Student Accountability” / Copyright Infringement / Dining / Equal Opportunity / Fees, Co-Curricular / Financial Aid, Student / Financial Responsibility / Hoverboards & Like DevicesIdentification Card / (Vanderbilt University) Logos and Word Marks, Use of by Registered Student Organizations / Mail Services / Missing Student Notification Policy / Nonacademic Undergraduate Class Designation / Parking and Transportation / Police Department, Vanderbilt University / Political Activity / Protection of Minors / Refunds of Tuition and Residence Hall Charges / Religious Holy Days & Practices / Residential Requirement / Student Spouse Privileges and International Student Same-Sex Domestic-Partner Registration and Privileges  / Sexual Misconduct: See Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence” / Smoke-Free Campus / Solicitation: See Chapter 5 “Student Engagement.” / Student Wellness / Student Records (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) / Study Abroad / Technology and Literary and Artistic Works / Universal Waiver / University Calendar / Vanderbilt Visions /

When communities come together for a purpose, they generally establish guidelines and procedures for furthering that purpose. The policies and regulations, articulated below, have been developed over time to serve the Vanderbilt community as it pursues its academic endeavors of teaching and learning. Some of the policies, such as the residential requirement, have been established to strengthen and complement the educational experience. Others, such as fees and dining plans, have been established to provide financial viability to programs and services that students desire or require. Still others, such as those dealing with addresses, enable effective communication. A number delineate procedures for students to follow when addressing issues.

Taken in their entirety, they may seem a bit overwhelming. However, they have served well both the institution and individual students. Trying to function without them would prove very challenging, if not chaotic.

Address and Name Change

Students are required to inform either the Office of the University Registrar or the offices of academic services within their respective schools, of any changes in their University or home addresses. Official notifications from the University will be sent to the address listed with the Office of the University Registrar. Student addresses and phone numbers may be updated by logging in to YES (Your Enrollment Services) and selecting the Address Change link.

Students who wish to change any part of their names as they appear in the Student Records System must provide official documentation supporting the requested change to the Office of University Registrar. More information on name changes may be found at http://registrar.vanderbilt.edu/academic-records/name-update/ .

Aerial Devices, “Unmanned” (Drones)

The University prohibits students from operating or using unmanned aerial devices (commonly called drones), on campus. Students seeking exceptions for the use of such devices in teaching or research may apply to the Provost’s office. Students seeking exceptions for use of such devices for co-curricular purposes may apply to the Dean of Students office.

Alcohol: See Chapter 6

Athletics, Student

Vanderbilt University competes in varsity athletics at the highest level sanctioned by the NCAA (Division I) within the highly regarded Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Commodores have experienced unprecedented success across the various sports, having garnered fifteen conference championships and three national championships in recent memory. Vanderbilt fields sixteen intercollegiate sports programs: football, baseball, men’s basketball, women’s basketball, women’s bowling (in the Southland Conference), men’s cross country, women’s cross country, men’s golf, women’s golf, women’s lacrosse (in the Big East Conference), women’s soccer, women’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis, women’s tennis, and women’s indoor and outdoor track and field.

During the 2015/2016 academic year, approximately 350 student-athletes competed in varsity athletics at Vanderbilt. Further information regarding Student Athletics can be found at http://www.vucommodores.com or by calling 615 32(2-6085).

A wide range of intramural and sport club opportunities are offered through the Recreation and Wellness Center or 615-34(3-6627).

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­Complaint and Grievance Procedures

Situations may arise in which a student believes that he/she/they has not received fair treatment by a representative of the University or has a complaint about the performance, action, or inaction of a member of the staff or faculty, affecting the student. A student who wishes to have a complaint addressed by the University should first use the Complaint Procedure, below, and then use the Grievance Procedure if the Complaint Procedure proves unsatisfactory. Students are encouraged to seek assistance from the office of the appropriate academic dean in cases involving classes, grades, or faculty members; the Office of the University Registrar in cases of unauthorized release of student educational records; and the Dean of Students office for release of accountability records or other matters; or, in regard to complaints of unlawful or prohibited discrimination, the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disabilities Services Department. Decisions of the Appellate Review Board, and decisions of appellate officers for cases of sexual misconduct, are not subject to the Complaint and Grievance Procedure.

Allegations of Discrimination, Harassment and Related Retaliation

The University generally prohibits discrimination or harassment (including sexual harassment) based on race, sex, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. (For a full discussion of what constitutes unlawful or prohibited discrimination, see the section on “Equal Opportunity.”) In addition, the University does not retaliate against individuals for filing or encouraging another to file a complaint of unlawful or prohibited discrimination, participating in an investigation of unlawful or prohibited discrimination, or opposing unlawful or prohibited discrimination. “Retaliation” includes any adverse action or act of revenge against an individual for filing or encouraging another to file a complaint of unlawful or prohibited discrimination, participating in an investigation of unlawful or prohibited discrimination, or opposing unlawful or prohibited discrimination. If a student believes that he/she/they has been discriminated against, harassed, or retaliated against, the student should report the matter to the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disabilities Services Department (EAD). The EAD will seek to assist the student with the resolution of the complaint as described below in the Complaint Procedure.

Complaint Procedure

A complaint should be directed as soon as possible to the person or persons whose actions or inactions have given rise to the complaint, but not later than six months after the event. Every effort should be made to resolve the problem fairly and promptly (usually within thirty [30]) days, at this level.

If the complaint involves allegations of sexual harassment, this step is not appropriate. (See Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”) In addition, in a complaint alleging prohibited discrimination, as noted above, the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disabilities Services Department (EAD) should be consulted as soon as possible. The EAD will conduct an investigation of the allegations (usually within ninety [90] business days), will issue a finding to the appropriate University official, and will seek to resolve the matter. If the EAD is unable to complete the investigation within this time period, then the EAD will contact the complainant and provide an estimated time frame for completing the investigation.

If the student is not able to resolve the complaint satisfactorily at this level, the student may appeal the decision within thirty (30) days through the appropriate administrative channels of the academic or administrative unit, or through the Provost or appropriate vice chancellor. Students uncertain about the proper channels or process are encouraged to seek advice from the Dean of Students office. If the student is not satisfied with a resolution proposed by the EAD, then the student may pursue the Grievance Procedure, below.

Grievance Procedure

A student who believes that he/she/they has not received fair treatment, or who has a complaint about the performance, action, or inaction of a member of the faculty or staff, and believes that he/she/they has not received appropriate redress through the Complaint Procedure in the preceding section within a reasonable period of time, including for complaints of prohibited discrimination investigated by the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disabilities Services Department (EAD), may file a written grievance with the Office of the Chancellor within thirty (30) days. Upon ascertaining that the complaint procedure has been exhausted, the Chancellor’s office shall refer the grievance to the Faculty Senate Committee on Student Affairs, usually within thirty (30) days during the academic year. For this purpose, the membership of the committee shall be augmented by three student members appointed by the Chancellor at the beginning of each academic year. The undergraduate Vanderbilt Student Government will nominate students for the one undergraduate position, and student governing bodies of the professional/graduate schools will nominate students for the other two student positions on a rotating basis.

Upon receiving the grievance referral from the Office of the Chancellor, the Student Affairs Committee shall inform, in writing, both parties to the grievance that a preliminary investigation will take place. The preliminary investigation will usually be completed within thirty (30) days. After the preliminary investigation, if the committee decides that the grievance is not frivolous, the committee shall follow procedures necessary to ensure a fair hearing of the matter, including the opportunity for the student to present relevant evidence, to challenge adverse evidence, and to have the complaint heard by an impartial committee. Committee members may recuse themselves if they believe their objectivity is subject to question, and the grievant may request any committee member recuse himself/herself/theirself if the grievant believes that a committee member will not view the grievance with sufficient objectivity. If vacancies occur, the chair of the Faculty Senate shall appoint Senate members to fill faculty vacancies and the Chancellor shall appoint students to fill student vacancies.

The student filing the grievance may be assisted during the hearing by a member of the University community (faculty, staff, or student) not trained in the law, and is encouraged to seek such assistance. Although all parties to the grievance are free to consult with, and receive advice from, attorneys concerning the grievance, no party shall be represented by an attorney at the hearing. For hearings or complaints of prohibited discrimination, a representative from the EAD shall be present in an advisory capacity. The committee may call upon any individuals who it believes may be helpful in resolving the grievance.

The grievant and the person or persons against whom the grievance was filed shall be present during the hearing until such time as the committee is ready to begin deliberations. The student may withdraw the grievance, with the consent of the other party, at any time prior to the decision of the committee.

After each case the committee shall write its report. The report should be completed within three weeks and shall include a statement of the committee’s findings, the basis for those findings, and, if necessary, recommendations for any corrective action that should be taken. If any disciplinary action is anticipated, the appropriate University disciplinary procedures shall be followed. The report, including the vote and any dissenting statements, shall be sent to the Chancellor within one week after completion. Except as disclosures are reasonably necessary in the investigation, hearing, and final disposition of a grievance, the grievant, members of the hearing bodies, and others having knowledge of a grievance are expected to preserve the confidentiality of the grievance.

The Chancellor shall communicate his decision to the committee. In any case in which the Chancellor does not follow the decision or the recommendation of the committee, the Chancellor shall report to the committee his/her/their reasons for so doing. The Office of the Chancellor shall then notify the student and the other affected persons, in writing, of the final decision, usually within thirty (30) days of receipt of the Committee’s report, during the academic year.

Grievance Procedures in the State of Tennessee

Students should be aware that, should they have complaints about their academic program or their financial aid, Vanderbilt has a complaint procedure. To the extent possible, students should seek a resolution of such matters through the institution’s complaint procedure before involving others. 

The student has the right to call on the state of Tennessee and its appropriate agency to determine the course of action. Complaints may be filed with the following agencies in Tennessee:

Distance Education Complaint and Grievance Procedures

Students enrolled in distance education programs offered by Vanderbilt University in states other than Tennessee should seek resolution for complaints through Vanderbilt’s complaint procedure. Distance education students may also contact the appropriate authority in their state of residence. For further information please visit http://www.vanderbilt.edu/provost/vanderbilt-university-distance-education-complaint-and-grievance-procedures-2/

 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)

Allegations regarding noncompliance with accreditation standards, policies, and procedures may be made to SACSCOC, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097. (The Commission’s complaint policy, procedures, and the Complaint Form may be found online .)

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Communications, Official University

Certain federal statutes require that information be delivered to each student. Vanderbilt delivers much of this information via email. Official electronic notifications, including those required by statutes, those required by University policy, and instructions from University officials, will be sent to students' Vanderbilt email addresses: user.name@vanderbilt.edu. Students are required to be familiar with the contents of official University notifications, and to respond to instructions and other official correspondence requiring a response.

Colleges and schools have additional policies regarding confidential communications initiated with the YES (Your Enrollment System) communications tool. These policies may be found in their respective catalogs.

The University makes every effort to avoid inundating students with nonessential email (often called "spam"), and maintains separate lists from which students may unsubscribe for announcements of general interest.

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Computer Privileges and Responsibilities

Conduct: See Chapter 3, “Student Accountability

Copyright Infringement

Vanderbilt responds to allegations of copyright infringement in digital and online media in accordance with procedures required by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Vanderbilt policy prohibits violations of copyright law by use of University networks, equipment, and facilities. Suspected student offenders are referred to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, which investigates, and where appropriate, initiates the University’s accountability process consistent with University policies and regulations. Vanderbilt’s information technology privileges and responsibilities are articulated in the University’s acceptable use policy at www.vanderbilt.edu/info/computing-aup.

The unauthorized copying, performance, or distribution of materials protected by copyright law may subject individuals to civil and criminal penalties. The distribution of material through peer-to-peer file-sharing networks may constitute copyright infringement if undertaken without authorization of the copyright owner.

Civil penalties for copyright infringement include fines of up to $30,000 per work infringed, or, in the case of willful infringement, $150,000 per work infringed. Criminal penalties for copyright infringement can be more severe and range, in the case of fines, from $5,000 to $250,000 per work infringed, and can include imprisonment of up to five years per offense depending on the facts of the case. Infringers may also be liable for attorney’s fees and court costs.

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Dining

First-year students living on campus are required to participate in the First-Year Meal Plan. Second-year students living on campus are required to participate in the fourteen-meal-per-week plan. Third-year students living on campus are required to participate in the eight-meal-per-week plan. All plans include Flex Meals and Meal Money, both of which may be replenished once depleted. Other undergraduates may purchase the 19-, 14- or 8-meal-per week plans at the MEALS website. Graduate and professional students may purchase Flex Meals on line at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/commodorecard/students.html . Detailed information on Vanderbilt Campus Dining and meal plans may be found at campusdining.vanderbilt.edu/.

Billing and Refunds

All billing on a student account is handled through the Office of Student Accounts. Prorated tuition refunds may be made in some cases of prolonged illness or withdrawal from the University, upon the recommendation of the student’s dean.

See also “Refunds of Tuition and Residence Hall Charges.”

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Equal Opportunity

In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Executive Order 11246, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008i, Vanderbilt University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their race, sex, sexual orientation ii , gender identity iii , religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, or genetic information in its administration of educational policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other University-administered programs; or employment. In addition, the University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their gender expression iv consistent with the University’s nondiscrimination policy.

i The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) prohibits discrimination in health coverage and in employment based on genetic information.

ii Sexual orientation refers to a person’s self-identification as heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, pansexual, or uncertain.

iii Gender identity is generally defined as a person’s own sense of identification as male, female, both, or neither as distinguished from actual biological sex, i.e. it is one’s psychological sense of self.

iv Gender expression is everything we do that communicates our sense of identification to others.

 Vanderbilt Campus Disability Access

Vanderbilt University is committed to equal access for people with disabilities. In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Vanderbilt does not exclude otherwise qualified persons with disabilities, solely by reason of the disability, from participating in University programs and activities, nor are persons with disabilities denied the benefits of these programs or subjected to discrimination.

The Disability Services Program, which is part of Vanderbilt’s Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department, provides reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities, which allow for equal access to education. Accommodations are available for Vanderbilt University students who have temporary or permanent disabilities and are based on the documented needs of each individual. To request reasonable accommodations, students are to contact the Disability Services Program to schedule an intake meeting with the appropriate staff person. Intake meetings are provided on an individual basis to help students orient themselves with the EAD’s processes and services. It is the individual student’s responsibility to request accommodations and provide sufficient and appropriate documentation. Students are encouraged to contact the EAD’s Disability Services Program prior to or upon enrollment at Vanderbilt University.

For further information about services for students with disabilities, write or call the EAD Disability Services Program, PMB 401809, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37240-1809; telephone 615-32(2-4705) V/TDD. (See EAD, below.)

The Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department (EAD)

The EAD serves as a resource in the following capacities:

Several federal and state laws impose special obligations on the University. Some include:

Of these laws, Title VI, Title IX, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the ADA and the ADAAA protect students from discrimination in educational and recreational programs and activities sponsored by the University. Discrimination is prohibited by Title VI on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin and by Title IX on the basis of sex, which includes sexual harassment. Students with disabilities are protected by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the ADA and the ADAAA. The EAD is the office responsible for coordinating services for students with disabilities. (See also “Vanderbilt Campus Disability Access.)

The EAD investigates allegations of prohibited discrimination, harassment, and retaliation involving members of the Vanderbilt community, including allegations of sexual misconduct and other forms of intimate partner violence.

Vanderbilt’s Title IX Coordinator is Anita Jenious, EAD Director.

A student who believes that a member of the Vanderbilt community has engaged in prohibited discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, may get in touch with the EAD. If the offense is criminal in nature, the student may file a report with Vanderbilt University Police Department (VUPD).

The EAD also facilitates interim accommodation for students impacted by sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence. Some examples of interim accommodation include stay-away orders, adjusted course schedules, and housing changes.

Specific concerns pertaining to prohibited discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, including allegations of sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence, should be directed to the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department (EAD), PMB 401809, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-1809; phone (615) 322-4705 (V/TDD); fax (615) 343-0671; http://www.vanderbilt.edu/ead/.

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Fees, Co-Curricular

All registered students are assessed mandatory activity and recreation fees, which are set by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust and billed through the Office of Student Accounts. Activity and Recreation fees appear as a combined charge on University statements: Ac/Rec Fees.

Student Act/Rec Fees for 2016/2017 are as follows:

  Fall 2016 Spring 2017 AY 16/17 Total Summer 17
Undergraduate $557 $557 $1114 $76
Graduate $219 $219 $438 $76
Professional $219 $219 $438 $76

Student Activities Fee

The Activities Fee supports student co-curricular interests and events. The funds collected from the fee are allocated to a wide variety of registered student organizations; Vanderbilt Student Communications, Inc.; student centers facilities; and Student Athletics.

For the academic year 2016/2017, each undergraduate is assessed $289 each semester (included in the figures, above). Graduate students and students in professional programs pay an activities fee of $81 each semester of the academic year.

Students enrolled for a summer term are assessed a fee of $12 to support summer programs.

 Activities fee for undergraduates covers:

Activities fee for graduate and professional students covers:

Graduate and professional students may have their identification cards validated for admission to home football and basketball games, on a seat-available basis, upon payment of an additional fee to Vanderbilt Student Athletics, equal to the amount paid for this privilege by undergraduates. Spouses and University certified domestic partners of full-time graduate and professional students may have their cards validated in this manner as well. Other activities included in the undergraduate activities fee are available to graduate and professional students on a single-admission or subscription basis only.

Activities Fee Committee.

The Student Activities Fee Committee is a representative student group, appointed by Vanderbilt Student Government (VSG), through an application process. On an annual basis, the AcFee Committee makes recommendations to the Dean of Students for allocation of the designated funds collected as student activities fees, to registered student organizations.

Student Recreation Fee

The Student Recreation Fee supports Vanderbilt’s recreational programs administered through the Vanderbilt Recreation and Wellness Center (VRWC), the operation of VRWC, and the University’s recreational playing fields.

For all students, use of facilities and participation in recreational programs or classes is on a space-available basis and subject to requirements, including operating hours, set by the VRWC. Special student charges are assessed for some classes and activities, as well as for use of certain equipment. 

Recreation Fee for Undergraduates

Each undergraduate student is assessed $268 each semester of the academic year and $64 during the summer. The fee covers:

Recreation Fee for Graduate and Professional Students

Each graduate and professional student is assessed $138 each semester of the academic year and $64 during the summer. Payment of the summer fee entitles graduate and professional students to the same privileges provided undergraduates.

The academic year fee covers:

Recreational Activities for Spouses and Partners

Spouses and University-certified same-sex domestic partners of undergraduate, graduate, and professional students may use the Vanderbilt Recreation & Wellness Center for a fee and participate in recreational classes, workshops, and outdoor programs. In order to use the facility, a spouse or University-certified domestic partner must obtain a Student Family identification card from the Vanderbilt Card Services in Sarratt Student Center. Students should accompany their spouses and eligible partners to the Vanderbilt Card Services. Spouses and partners may inquire at the main desk of the VRWC concerning registration and payment of fees after a University I.D. card has been obtained.

Waiver of Student Fees

The Student Activities and Recreation fees are mandatory fees set by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust. Waivers of these fees for fall or spring semesters may be granted for students meeting at least one of two criteria:

  1. a part-time student registered for four or fewer credit hours (including audit credit) or
  2. a full- or part-time student residing outside a circle of approximately sixty miles from the Vanderbilt campus, as determined by ZIP codes. (Note that it is the student’s responsibility to notify the Office of the University Registrar of an address change in a timely manner.)

Graduate students carrying thesis or dissertation hours are considered full-time students and are not eligible for a waiver based on part-time status. Students living outside the ”sixty-mile radius” from Vanderbilt who desire to obtain a waiver for distance, must petition the Student Fees Waiver Committee in writing to receive consideration for a waiver of these fees. An online waiver from is available at www.vanderbilt.edu/recadmin. The Student Fees Waiver Committee will review each request, and petitioners must apply each semester. It is the University’s policy that there are no waivers of the summer activity and recreation fees.

All students eligible for a waiver of student fees must petition for a waiver by August 12th for the fall semester and by January 1st for the spring semester. No waivers will be granted unless requests are received by these deadlines. Waivers for prior semesters will not be granted. For questions or clarifications of these fees, please call Recreation Administration at 615 32(2-3963) or email waiverscommittee@vanderbilt.edu. Access to the waiver request form can be found online, or by writing to Student Fees Waiver Committee, PMB 406206, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-6206. Waiver request forms must be completed each semester.

In some rare cases, waivers may be granted if exceptional circumstances apply. Exceptional circumstances do not include a student’s lack of time or inclination to make use of facilities, services, or programs, or a student’s financial circumstances. The Student Fees Waiver Committee reviews each request, and petitioners must apply each semester and meet the deadlines provided, above.

Students requesting an exceptional circumstance waiver based on a medical condition must have their physicians submit documentation to the Medical Director of Student Health, Vanderbilt University, Zerfoss Building MCN, Nashville, TN, 37232-8710 by mail, fax 615-34(3-0047) or by email to studenthealth@vanderbilt.edu. The Medical director evaluates submitted documentation and makes recommendations to the Student Fees Waiver Committee.

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Financial Aid, Student

The Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships provides students and parents with information and assistance in their search, and application, and processing actions regarding financial assistance (federal, state, and institutional) available at Vanderbilt. To be considered for need-based financial assistance from Vanderbilt, a student must complete the College Scholarship Service (CSS) Financial Aid PROFILE. To be considered for federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs, a student must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Upon the student’s completing the required financial aid application materials, the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships will provide information regarding a student’s financial aid eligibility and any additional steps required to finalize assistance for the student. Grants, scholarships, and Federal Work Study employment opportunities are available for eligible students. Students and/or parents may also be eligible for loans, if necessary. More information about both need-based and merit-based assistance is available on the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships website.

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Financial Responsibility

Tuition, fees, and all charges associated with the beginning of the semester are due and payable in full by the beginning of classes. The payment deadline for fall 2016 is August 17; for spring 2017, the payment deadline is January 3. If a student adds courses after the initial billing period, it is the student’s responsibility to inquire of the Office of Student Accounts for due dates and amounts due related to tuition in order to avoid holds and/or late payment penalties. A student who misses the payment deadline for either semester will be charged a 1.5% late payment fee and may have his/her/their registration cancelled. In addition, YES (Your Enrollment System), Commodore Cash, and Meal Money may be suspended. Payment options may be found Office of Student Accounts website.

All first-year and new transfer students must complete a Student Account Agreement form prior to August 1, 2016. Forms are available in the Office of Student Accounts or online.

Students and their parents (or legal guardians) will be responsible for payment of all costs, including reasonable attorney fees and collection agency fees, incurred by the University in collecting moneys owed to the University. Students are bound by laws of Tennessee governing bad checks.

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Hoverboards & Like Devices

The use, possession, or storage of Hoverboards, Swagways, IO Hawks, Skywalkers, and similar devices is prohibited inside all Vanderbilt buildings and facilities, including, but not limited to, residence halls, Greek houses, student centers, academic buildings, labs, and parking structures. 

Operators of such devices on University sidewalks must yield to pedestrians and must provide audible notice of their presence in close proximity of pedestrians. 

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Identification Card

The Commodore Card is the official identification card for the University. All students, whether full- or part-time, are required to have a valid identification card for any semester in which they are registered. The card is the property of the University, and if a student withdraws, it must be relinquished to the office of the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled. The Commodore Card is not transferable, and altering cards is prohibited. Damaged cards should be replaced (for a fee) at the Vanderbilt Card Services. If misused, cards may be invalidated for specific activities such as varsity athletic events or Recreation Center access.

Students must comply with Vanderbilt Card Services’ policy and requirements regarding photos provided for Commodore Card identification. Failure to comply with such regulations and requirements may result in the disabling of a card, and referral of non-compliant students to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity for corrective action.

In addition to using the Commodore Card for identification, students may use their cards to access Commodore Cash debit spending funds, to make use of their VU Meal Plan, to gain admission to campus buildings such as residences, academic buildings, libraries, athletic events and the Student Recreation Center, and to gain admission or record attendance at events across the campus.

Many on-campus and off-campus locations accept the Commodore Card as a method of payment, including dining locations, the Vanderbilt bookstore, Varsity Markets, vending, laundry, taxi service, certain VUprint stations and copy machines, Sarratt Ticket Office, the campus post office, Athletics concessions, Outdoor Recreation Center and restaurants participating in the Taste of Nashville program. For information on funding your Commodore Cash debit spending account, visit the Commodore Card website.

To ensure that Commodore Cash debit spending funds and access privileges can be protected, students must report lost cards as soon as possible either to Vanderbilt Card Services during business hours or online. Lost cards may also be reported to the Vanderbilt University Police Department at 615-32(2-2745).

The University reserves the option of suspending Commodore Card debit privileges, in whole or in part, of any individual for any reason. In the event that debit privileges are entirely suspended, any funds remaining in a the Commodore Cash debit spending account will be returned to the individual’s student account, or otherwise returned if the individual has no student account.

The Commodore Card is nontransferable and restricted to use by the person whose name and picture are on the card. Cardholders may not lend their cards to anyone or ask anyone to purchase items for them with their cards. Violation of this policy may result in confiscation of the card and in corrective action through the University’s accountability process. Commodore Card account information will be released only to the cardholder or to the guarantor of the student account, who has been identified as such by the student on documents filed with the Office of Student Accounts.

Family Identification Card

Upon payment of a $10 fee, the spouse or University-certified domestic partner of a full-time student (undergraduate, graduate, or professional) may obtain a family identification card from the Vanderbilt Card Services by presenting proof of marriage (or University certification of domestic partner status). The student spouse or partner must accompany the individual applying for the card and each must show current photo identification. When properly validated upon payment of the appropriate fees, a family card will admit the family member to home football, basketball, and baseball games (on a seat-available basis), competitions in other sports, libraries, or the Student Recreation Center (if a membership is purchased).

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(Vanderbilt University) Logos and Word Marks, Use of by Registered Student Organizations

All logos, seals, names, symbols, and slogans associated with, and used by, Vanderbilt University are trademarks and are the exclusive property of the University. Reproduction and use of these marks must be approved by the Office of Trademark Licensing. Such reproduction includes all products (e.g., T-shirts, mugs, uniforms) that are used for internal use, sale, or promotional giveaways, and use on websites and in URLs for websites. Students may call the Trademark Licensing Office at 615-32(2-4461) or visit the website for more information. Note that use of such marks for letterhead, business cards, etc., is overseen by Creative Services.

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Mail Services

Undergraduate students living on campus are eligible for mail and package deliveries, free of charge, to their VU Mail Services assigned campus PMB delivery address.

Postbaccalaureate students and nonresident undergraduates may obtain a PMB delivery address at the Station B Post Office in Sarratt | Rand, and will be charged a fee. (See “Fees,” below.)

Undergraduates typically retain their VU Mail Services PMB addresses for the duration of their undergraduate studies at Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt undergraduates who subsequently enroll in graduate or professional schools at Vanderbilt may keep the originally assigned address, but will be charged a fee while in the graduate or professional program. (See “Fees,” below.)

Students who leave the University for any reason (other than short, temporary period) may not receive VU Mail Services, and should submit a change of address card to the Station B, or complete the online form on the VU Mail Services website.

Receiving illegal items or substances through VU Mail Services is prohibited. Students who use VU Mail Services improperly, or who fail to return equipment they have borrowed to transport packages, or who fail to return items delivered to them in error, will be referred to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity. 

Mailing Instructions and Shipping:

University policy prohibits residential staff from accepting package deliveries at residence halls due to the lack of storage space and concerns regarding liability. For package delivery, see the paragraph on packages, below.

First-class mail is available, daily, by 10am. Students receiving mail will be sent an email with the subject “You’ve Got Mail,” and may proceed to the “Mail Pick-Up, Only” window at Station B.

Packages, parcels, boxes and mail requiring signatures are inventoried when they arrive at Station B and Peabody mail centers. Email package notification is then sent to the recipient student’s Vanderbilt email address with the subject “Package Arrival Notification” and with an indication of the location where the package may be picked up.

Students must present valid student ID (Commodore Card) in order to pick up their packages. Students may use any shipping carrier, and should insure all packages up to the value of the contents. Students should number the packages when sending more than one. Example: 1 of 4, 2 of 4, etc. First-year students should consult the Mail Services website for specific move-in instructions.

Packages will be held for five days, at which time a second-notice will be emailed. Packages will be held three additional days, and if unclaimed, returned to the sender without further notice. Refrigerated items must be clearly marked as such, will be held no longer than five days, and if unclaimed returned to the sender without further notice.

For more information call the Station B Post Office at 615 32(2-2934). Students who need assistance on how to ship items to or from Vanderbilt may visit either the Station B Post office or the Peabody Mail Center, or visit the Mail Services website. Students with disabilities who need assistance with packages may inquire at either location.

Fees

Undergraduates who choose to study abroad or who have authorization to reside off campus, will be charged $20 for a PMB delivery address on a per-semester basis (spring and fall). Students who do not want to incur these charges must complete the following procedure:

Failure to follow this procedure will result in the charge being assessed.

Graduate and professional students who wish to be assigned a PMB address on campus may make arrangements in person at the Station B Post Office in Sarratt | Rand. The fee of $20 is on a per-semester basis, and may be paid by cash or check, only.

Internal Mail / Campus Mail

Students, registered student organizations, and departments may use the internal campus mail service without paying postage.

Candidates for student offices will not be granted authorization to distribute un-addressed mail.

A complete list of policies regarding campus mail may be found on the VU Mail Services website.

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Missing Student Notification Policy

In compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, Vanderbilt University provides each student residing on campus the opportunity to designate a confidential contact to be notified by the University in the event that the University, through its established procedures, determines that a student is missing. Although not required, Vanderbilt makes the missing student notification procedure available to all students.

This confidential contact is in addition to any other emergency contact that the student may identify, although both the “confidential” contact and the “emergency” contacts may be the same person or persons. In the case of non-emancipated students under the age of eighteen, the HEOA requires that a custodial parent or guardian be notified; however, an additional, confidential contact may also be specified. Students may designate both emergency contacts and confidential contacts by logging into YES (Your Enrollment Services) at https://yes.vanderbilt.edu, and selecting the appropriate process.

Once the Vanderbilt University Police Department has determined that a student is missing, the Dean of Students or one of the Dean’s designees will notify the confidential contact within 24 hours. Vanderbilt University will also notify an appropriate external law enforcement agency and others at the University, as appropriate, about the missing student, within the same 24-hour period.

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Nonacademic Undergraduate Class Designation

Determination of a student’s class for nonacademic purposes is usually based on the number of years the student has been in residence, regardless of the number of credit hours accumulated. A student in the first year of full-time study is classified as a first-year student for purposes of meal plans, parking privileges, running for campus office, etc., even if the student has achieved sophomore academic standing because of summer enrollment or advanced placement. Transfer students enrolled in an accelerated three-year graduation program are classified in consultation with the appropriate student affairs deans of their respective schools or colleges. Classification for room assignments in campus residences, is determined by the office of Housing and Residential Education in consultation with Vanderbilt Student Government.

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Parking and Transportation

Motor vehicles operated on campus by Vanderbilt University faculty, staff, and students must be registered annually with Parking Services. Resident student parking on campus is a privilege and is primarily reserved for juniors and seniors. First-year students may not register or park vehicles on campus; however, a limited number of long-term vehicle-storage spaces are available to sophomores on a first-come, first-served basis. Complete parking regulations may be found on the Parking Services website.

Motorcycles, Motorized Bicycles, Mopeds, and Motor Scooters

As above, motorized vehicles operated on campus by Vanderbilt University faculty, staff, and students, must be registered annually with Parking Services. The operation of motorcycles, motorized bicycles, motor scooters, and mopeds on sidewalks (walkways and similar paths) is prohibited, in keeping with Tennessee ordinance #55-8-101(37). Vehicles providing for of accessibility (such as motorized wheel chairs), are exempt from the prohibition if approved in advance through the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department (EAD), 615-32(2-4705). Complete regulations regarding motorcycles etc., can be found on theParking Services website.

 Bicycles

Sections of the Metropolitan Nashville Traffic and Parking Code dealing with bicycles apply both on and off campus. Vanderbilt policy concerning the use of bicycles on campus is as follows:

when overtaking and passing a vehicle going in the same direction,

when preparing for a left turn, or

when avoiding obstacles or hazards.

Registering Bicycles

Registration of bicycles through Operation ID at the Vanderbilt University Police Department helps to deter theft and helps to identify the owners of bicycles that have been recovered. Bicycles may be registered online. Bicycle owners should notify Vanderbilt Police if their bicycles are stolen or if they sell their registered bicycles.

Bicycle Parking

To prevent theft, U-locks should be used to secure bicycles to racks. Bicycles may not be parked in the public areas of campus buildings. Securing bicycles to the decorative grillwork of campus buildings, to hand rails, or to any structures not designated for securing bicycles is prohibited. In certain areas, fences have been adapted for use as bike racks, where such use does not impede traffic. Bicycles may not be secured to fences adjacent to stairs or sidewalks, or within fifteen feet of a building entrance or exit.

Bicycle Accidents

Persons involved in bicycle accidents that result in personal injury should report the accidents to the Vanderbilt University Police Department.

Golf Carts

Golf carts are prohibited on campus, except when used by those departments (Alumni Events, e.g.) that must use such carts in the undertaking of their responsibilities during special events. Rare exceptions may be made by the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee in consultation with the Director of the Student Health Center and Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services (EAD), for students whose mobility impairment cannot be accommodated by any other device. Golf carts may not be operated on Metro streets and must yield to pedestrians on sidewalks.

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Police Department, Vanderbilt University

As one of Tennessee’s larger law enforcement agencies, the Vanderbilt University Police Department provides comprehensive law enforcement and security services to all components of Vanderbilt University, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and a variety of University-owned facilities throughout Davidson County. Both non-commissioned and commissioned officers staff the department.

Commissioned officers are empowered to make arrests as “Special Police Officers,” through the authority of the Chief of Police of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County. Vanderbilt officers with special police commissions have the same authority as that of a municipal law enforcement officer while on property owned, operated or otherwise controlled by Vanderbilt.

When a Vanderbilt student is involved in an off-campus incident, Vanderbilt police officers may assist with the investigation in cooperation with local, state, or federal law enforcement. Metro Nashville police routinely work and communicate with Vanderbilt officers on any serious incident occurring on campus or in the neighborhoods and business areas surrounding campus.

Metro Nashville police have primary jurisdiction in all areas off campus, but Vanderbilt police officers are often dispatched to respond to student-related incidents that occur in close proximity to campus. Vanderbilt officers have direct radio communications with the Nashville police, fire department, and ambulance services to facilitate rapid response in any emergency situation.

VUPD offers a wide variety services described in detail on its website. Services include the following:

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Political Activity

Vanderbilt encourages students to engage with public issues and in the political process to the fullest extent of their interests. However, because of its tax-exempt status, the University is subject to restrictions concerning certain political activities. In particular, the Internal Revenue Code imposes limitations on tax-exempt organizations relating to attempts to influence legislation, and an absolute prohibition on participating or intervening in political campaigns on behalf of, or in opposition to, candidates for public office.

These limitations affect students and student organizations in several ways. For one, the prohibition on supporting or opposing political candidates means that student organizations must not use the benefits they receive from Vanderbilt, such as funds, space, or use of facilities, on behalf of a political candidate. If Vanderbilt space or facilities are provided to a candidate, the University must approve such use in advance, as well as determine, and collect from the candidate, the fair market rate for such use, to be charged equally to any candidates, in advance of the use.

Students and student organizations are prohibited from taking any action that would imply that Vanderbilt is endorsing or opposing particular candidates, political parties, or organizations. Although every member of the academic community has a right to participate (or not to participate, as the member sees fit), in the election process, no student may speak or act in Vanderbilt’s name in connection with any person’s campaign for office.

Registered student organizations permitted to make use of the University’s name or marks should take special care to avoid implying University endorsement of--or opposition to--candidates. Using the University’s name, facilities, or resources to support or oppose candidates for public office is prohibited.

Students who choose to run for public office while enrolled at Vanderbilt must separate their campaign activities from their association with the University. This could mean finding a location other than their campus residences, if they have any, from which to conduct campaign activities. It also means that they must refrain from using the University’s communications systems, computer facilities, or mail system in the service of their campaigns.

In the interest of furthering its educational mission, Vanderbilt may allow candidates for office to speak or hold public events on campus, and if it does, then access is provided without discrimination as to viewpoint or party affiliation among candidates. Students or student groups wishing the University to invite speakers who are candidates should consult the Office of Public Affairs to comply with this section.

Students or student organizations who wish to lobby legislative bodies for the purpose of influencing legislation should ensure either that they do not make use of any affiliation with Vanderbilt when doing so, or that they first consult the Office of Public Affairs concerning any Vanderbilt-related lobbying so that the University’s legal obligations with respect to reporting lobbying expenses can be met.

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Protection of Minors

Vanderbilt believes strongly in educating individuals on best practices for keeping minors safe and the duty to report child maltreatment. For many Vanderbilt students, interaction with children and adolescents through service or academics is a vital part the Vanderbilt experience. And, students involved in research may also interact with minors as observers of--or participants in--the research. 

Vanderbilt hosts thousands of minors in programs and activities. The Protection of Minors policy  was created to raise awareness of issues associated with minors, to standardize University practices and to establish expected codes of conduct when interacting with minors in Vanderbilt programs. The policy also includes individual compliance regulations and steps for program registration in a central repository managed by the Office of Risk and Insurance Management .

All students are required to complete Protection of Minors online training, and all students, who are participating in student organizations, courses, or other Vanderbilt activities with minors are required to be in compliance with the University’s Protection of Minors policy. Tennessee is a mandatory reporting state, and all suspicions of child abuse must be reported. The Protection of Minors policy clarifies the reporting process for both internal and external reporting requirements at Vanderbilt.

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Refunds of Tuition and Residence Hall Charges

University policy for the refund of tuition and room charges provides a percentage refund based on the dates of withdrawal and check-out from the residence. Students who withdraw officially or who are dismissed from the University for any reason may be entitled to a partial refund in accordance with the established schedule available on the Office of Student Accounts website.

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Religious Holy Days & Practices

Vanderbilt is a private and non-sectarian University that has committed itself to helping its students acquire knowledge and standards of value, develop a sense of responsibility, explore religious concerns and issues, and develop their own sense of purpose. The University itself is diverse in its makeup and perspectives and encourages diversity in its student body.

The University, therefore, provides both directly and indirectly for the religious and moral development of its students. Programs in this area are predicated on the right of students to form and freely express their own beliefs and values. A campus where persons from diverse traditions live and work is an open forum for all perspectives. Respect for all religious faiths is essential; observances and holy days are honored; and dialogue among groups is encouraged.

Code of Behavior for Religious Groups

The element of personal development, as mentioned above has been given expression in the establishment of the Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life, in the recognition of qualified affiliated religious professionals, and in the registration of student religious groups whose goals are in keeping with those of the University. The purposes of the University are harmonious with the purposes of addressing issues of religion, values, ethics, and morality of life; in helping members of the University community to articulate a personal philosophy of life, and in understanding the interactions of faith, intellectual inquiry, and social responsibility as bases for finding and affirming meaning and satisfaction in life.

Specific University goals for moral and religious development include the development of programs to help those in the University community to:

  1. understand their own faiths and the faiths of others;
  2. examine and affirm a personal faith or life philosophy;
  3. express these faiths and philosophies through association with others, through opportunities for worship, study, and service, and by engaging Vanderbilt’s religious pluralism through interfaith cooperation and dialogue;
  4. examine the relation of their faith or life philosophy to current moral, ethical, and social issues and to various academic disciplines and professional and vocational fields.

These goals will be met by the University itself in a non-sectarian manner, and the University expects all religious groups on campus to give evidence of tolerance, fairness, and respect for the religious traditions represented at the University, to respect the non-sectarian nature of the University itself, and to uphold the University’s commitment to creating a diverse and pluralistic community on campus.

The University expects that all religious groups which are affiliated, recognized, or registered, respectively, will conduct their affairs so that their policies, programs, and personal actions are in accordance with University catalogs, handbooks, and manuals, such as the Student Handbook, and the Faculty Manual . In particular, the University expects all religious groups to abide strictly by the policy on “Soliciting for Religious Activities,” and, with the provision that student groups must be led by full-time Vanderbilt students. The University also expects that all such religious groups on campus will conduct their affairs in such a manner that no one will be intimidated or coerced and that participants in any group may freely express their beliefs and values. The University requires all registered student organizations to comply with its nondiscrimination policy for student organizations as outlined in Chapter 5 of the Student Handbook “Student Engagement .”

The University reserves the right to make other regulations as necessary, without notice, to secure maximum freedom, comfort, safety, and convenience for all. Violations of this code of behavior will be addressed through the University’s accountability process, the Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life, and/or the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department.

Policy Regarding Observance of Religious Holy Days

It is the policy of Vanderbilt to make every reasonable effort to allow members of the University community to observe their religious holy days without academic penalty. Absence from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of absence. Students who expect to miss classes, examinations, or any other assignments as a consequence of their religious observance should be provided with a reasonable alternative opportunity to complete such academic responsibilities. It is the obligation of students to provide faculty with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which they will be absent, preferably at the beginning of the semester. Students who are absent on days of examinations or class assignments should be offered an opportunity to make up the work without penalty (if they have previously arranged to be absent), unless it can be demonstrated that a makeup opportunity would constitute an unreasonable burden on a member of the faculty. Should disagreement arise over what constitutes an unreasonable burden or any element of this policy, parties involved should consult the department chair, or, in schools without department chairs, the dean of the school.

A listing of religious holy days and policies may be found at The Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life website.

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Residential Requirement

The Residential Requirement, established by the Board of Trust in 1952, states that “All unmarried undergraduate students are required to live in residence halls on campus during the academic year, May session, and summer sessions. Authorization to live elsewhere is granted at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments in special siteuations, or when space is unavailable on campus.” A full discussion of residence life may be found in Chapter 4 “Residential Life.”

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Student Spouse Privileges and International Student Same-Sex Domestic-Partner Registration and Privileges

 

Vanderbilt University extends certain privileges to students’ spouses who are not enrolled at Vanderbilt. These same privileges are extended to the  same-sex domestic partners of international students (whose countries prohibit same-sex marriage), who are not enrolled at Vanderbilt and who, on an annual basis, register with the Dean of Students office. Such benefits include the following:

Eligibility for Commodore Card identification, and, upon payment of appropriate activation and other fees, access to a number of services.

 

The Process

For Married Couples:

The student and the his/her/their spouse present their marriage certificate to the Card Services office to obtain a Vanderbilt ID for the spouse.

If at some point the marriage is dissolved, the student must notify the Dean of Students office within 60 calendar days, and the non-student spouse must return the Commodore Card issued to him/her/them to the Dean of Students office.

 For International Student Same-Sex Domestic Partners

  1. The international student and his/her/their  same-sex domestic partner visit the Dean of Students office, each in possession of state- or federally-issued identification.1
  2. The international student and his/her/their same-sex domestic partner will complete an affidavit affirming that they meet the following criteria:
    • that they are not related by blood in a manner that would prohibit them from being married under Tennessee state law.2
    • that they are at least 18 years of age.3
    • that they are not legally married to anyone else.
    • that they reside in a common household and share responsibility for the household.
  3. Upon completion of the affidavit, a Dean of Students representative will notarize it, photocopies the affidavit and identification, and provides a paper or digital copies to the student and spouse/partner and the Vanderbilt Card Services.
  4. The student and partner then visit Vanderbilt Card Services together in order to obtain a Commodore Card for the registered partner.
  5. If at some point the marriage, civil union, or/or domestic partnership is dissolved, the student must notify the Dean of Students office within 60 calendar days, and the non-student spouse/partner must return the Commodore Card issued to him/her/them to the Dean of Students office.

Further Considerations

Consistent with the practice of Vanderbilt Card Services, all spouses (partners) are required to re-register annually to renew the card and to continue these benefits.

1 A state driver’s license or non-driver ID; passport; a federal ID such as a military identification card, state, county or local government ID; or lawful permanent resident cards (often called “green cards”)

2 Tennessee code states, “Marriage cannot be contracted with a lineal ancestor or descendant, nor the lineal ancestor or descendant of either parent, nor the child of a grandparent, nor the lineal descendants of husband or wife, as the case may be, nor the husband or wife of a parent or lineal descendant.” http://www.state.tn.us/tccy/tnchild/36/36-3-101.htm

3 For spousal or domestic partnerships involving a student or partner under the age of 18, the student and partner and parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of the person(s) under 18 must meet with the Associate Dean of Students for a review of the proposed registration.

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Sexual Misconduct: See Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence”

Smoke-Free Campus

Vanderbilt University is a smoke-free campus. Smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes, vaporizers, etc., are prohibited in all buildings on campus, including University residence halls and Greek chapter houses, and on the grounds of the campus with the exception of designated outdoor smoking areas.

Locations of designated smoking areas for students, faculty, staff and campus visitors may be found on an online map at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/info/smokingpolicy/.

Locations of additional designated smoking areas for campus residents may be found on the Housing and Residential Education website. Greek organizations may elect to designate outdoor smoking areas on their house grounds.

Designated smoking areas are marked with signs and include cigarette urns for disposal.

Vanderbilt University is committed to providing a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment and offers several resources for smoking cessation. “Quit Kits” can be obtained free of charge from the Center for Student Wellbeing, and links to other resources can be found on its website. 

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Solicitation: See Chapter 5 “Student Engagement.”

Student Wellbeing

The Student Health Center

The Student Health Center provides primary care and some specialty services for registered students. Services include routine medical care, chronic disease management office-based gynecology, travel medicine, nutrition services, and sports medicine. The Student Health Center also has a lab and can perform office-based tests and can send samples to the Vanderbilt Medical Center laboratory as needed.

The Student Health Center’s hours of operation are posted on the center’s website. Students seeking treatment should call ahead at 615-32(2-2427) to schedule appointments. Students with urgent issues will be seen on a “same-day” basis, and if no appointment time is available, will be worked in on a “first-come, first-served” basis, and triaged according to severity of illness.

Emergency on-call consultation services are available at 615-32(2-2427), 24 hours a day, seven days a week. More detailed information about services and health related topics may be found at the Student Health Center website.

Immunization Requirements

The State of Tennessee requires certain immunizations for all students (undergraduate, graduate, and professional) on university campuses. Students not in compliance with these mandated immunizations will NOT be allowed to register for classes. Waivers for required vaccines may be granted for religious or medical reasons; such waivers are granted only by the Student Health Center. Instructions for providing waiver request documentation can be found on the immunizations requirements website.

The requirements include:

All incoming students must upload a Student Health Center Immunization Requirements form. Instructions and further information are located on the immunizations requirements website. The completed Immunization Requirements form must be uploaded to the Student Health Center immunization portal by May 15, 2016. The form also collects important health history information that enables the Student Health Center staff to better serve individual student needs.

Charges

There are no office-visit co-pays for routine visits, but for medications or supplies dispensed, students will incur small charges. There are small co-pays associated with some office procedures or specialty visits (such as wart removal and colposcopy). Medication and supplies ordered by Student Health physicians and nurse practitioners can usually be provided to students “at cost,” and almost always at a price below typical pharmacy co-pays or charges. Credit cards, cash, and the Commodore Card, or a charge to the student account may be used to pay for any charges incurred at the Student Health Center. The Student Health Center has no relationship with any insurance company and cannot bill insurance for charges incurred at the Center.

Any lab tests not performed at the Student Health Center are sent to the Vanderbilt Medical Center and are billed to the student’s health insurance company by the Medical Center. In addition, when a student is referred to a specialist outside of the Student Health Center, charges incurred are billed by that clinic to the student’s health insurance company. Any amount remaining after health insurance has paid its share is the student’s responsibility. If a student has an Emergency Department visit after-hours because of a serious illness or injury, the Medical Center will bill the student and his/her insurance company.

Confidentiality

Care provided at the Student Health Center is confidential and in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations. It is only with explicit written consent from the student that the Student Health Center may communicate with Deans, parents, professors, or other health care professionals.

HIPAA does have a clause that allows notification of families in the event that the student is in an emergency or life-threatening situation.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center personnel will ask treated students in the Emergency Department about notification of staff Housing and Residential Education and the Student Health Center. Except in cases of a life-threatening emergency, notification requires the student’s permission and is strongly encouraged. This practice enables the University to provide support and assistance to students and their families.

Medical Excuse Policy

The Student Health Center does not provide “excuses” for everyday illnesses (such as colds or minor other minor illnesses) that may lead to missed classes or delay in completion of assignments. Vanderbilt University expects students to be honest with their instructors regarding their ability to complete work, and expects instructors to work with students on these issues. Student Health can provide students with cards documenting a visit to the Student Health Center, but details of minor illnesses are not routinely provided. The student’s right to privacy is one of the important issues that guides this policy. In addition, since there is great variability in each student’s response to minor illnesses, the Student Health Center cannot always predict which students will miss assignments or classes in response to such ailments. Honest communication between an instructor and a student can better address these situations.

In cases of more serious illness or injury, especially those that would require prolonged bed rest or hospitalization, the Student Health Center will, with the student’s permission, notify the student’s academic dean of the student’s illness so that instructors may be formally informed of the circumstances.

Quarantine

Vanderbilt University must enforce public health mandates as required by public health authorities, and may also follow Medical Center and Student Health Center recommendations when the University determines them to be in the best interest of the Vanderbilt community and the public. As a result, among other needed interventions, students in campus housing may be required to relocate so that appropriate isolation and/or quarantine can be accomplished.

Student Injury and Sickness Insurance Plan

All degree-seeking students (with the exception of those in the Division of Unclassified students) registered for four or more hours at Vanderbilt are automatically enrolled in–and will be billed for–a University-endorsed health insurance plan offered by Gallagher Student Health and Risk, unless they complete the online waiver process. Information about the plan is available online at www.gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt. In addition, an insurance representative has an office at the Student Health Center and can be reached at 615-34(3-4688).

The annual premium is in addition to tuition. Coverage for undergraduate students begins August 12 and extends through August 11 the following calendar year, if the student remains in school for 31 days beginning August 11. After 31 days, the coverage remains in effect whether the student is in school or is away from the University, and there is no pro rata refund for this coverage.

The plan provides hospital, surgical, and major medical benefits. A brochure explaining the limits, exclusions, and benefits of the plan is available online at www.gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt, at registration, in the Office of Student Accounts, or at the Student Health Center. The plan requires that the Student Health Center be the student’s primary care provider in Nashville, but will provide coverage for referrals to specialists when a written referral is made by a Student Health Center provider.

Waiver of Insurance Plan

A student who does not wish to subscribe to the insurance plan offered through the University must notify the University of comparable coverage under another policy. Waiver of the student insurance plan does not affect eligibility for services at the student Health Center. The online waiver process may be found online. The insurance charge will not be waived if the online process is not completed by August 1 for the fall semester, or by January 6 for students who are newly enrolled for the spring semester. The waiver process must be completed each academic year.

Family Coverage

An additional premium is charged for family insurance coverage. An eligible student who wishes to provide coverage for his/her/their spouse or University-certified domestic partner, and/or children, may do so at www.gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt.

International Student Coverage

International students are automatically enrolled in, and billed for, the Gallagher plan, in compliance with federal regulations relations to J-1 visa status, which requires international students and their dependents to maintain adequate insurance coverage. Students who have adequate coverage and wish to waive the Gallagher plan (and charge) may complete an on-line waiver. The deadline is September 7 for the fall semester and January 15 for new, incoming students for the spring semester. The waiver process must be completed each academic year.

For more information, visit the Student Health Center website.

The Psychological and Counseling Center

The Psychological and Counseling Center (PCC) provides mental health assessment, support, and treatment for students enrolled at Vanderbilt. The team of clinical professionals includes psychologists, licensed counselors including substance use specialists, and psychiatric medical providers. 

Services include individual counseling, a variety of group therapy options, and psychiatric assessment and treatment Students may work with a trained biofeedback counselor as another means of addressing anxiety or stress and pain among other symptoms.. The PCC provides psychological testing including assessments for ADHD and learning disabilities.

Students with urgent issues may visit the PCC without appointment to meet with the triage clinician. If there are multiple students seeking triage services the students will be seen on a “first-come, first served” basis. Flexibility is maintained to address student needs according to level of acuity

In addition the PCC offers a Mindfulness Practices Workshop intermittently throughout the year with a focus on development of self-care skills. The PCC offers self-guided care at its Mind Body Lab, which is accessible at the PCC or by visiting the lab’s website.

The PCC staff is available to consult with students, faculty, and staff who are concerned about a student’s mental health. Consultations are available through the PCC’s drop-in triage, or by phone.

The PCC is open according to the schedule posted on the center’s website. Students seeking to schedule an appointment may call 615-32(2-2571), or visit the website to use the online scheduling system.

Students may seek brief support for distressing situations and may take advantage of Let’s Talk, a drop-in service on campus at various locations as detailed on the website. This program enables students to have rapid access to a counselor for support.

Finally, the PCC has a counselor and a psychiatrist located at the Student Health Center for consultation on a limited basis.

The PCC collaborates with the Center for Wellbeing to provide outreach, prevention, and education, one specific focus being suicide prevention through MAPS (Mental health Awareness & Prevention of Suicide) training for students, faculty, and staff. Training is conducted by PCC counselors and a team of student ambassadors in LEAPS (Liaisons Educating & Advocating for Psychological Support), who are supported by the Center for Student Wellbeing. These resources are provided to facilitate stress management in order to minimize or prevent mental health problems.

More details about services may be found at the PCC website.

Charges

The PCC does not charge for routine services, but does charge for psychological testing, both for a screening ($20), and for a full test ($475), and for specific disability assessments when indicated. The student is expected to pay for the testing prior to its being scheduled. Students may pay with cash, check, or may charge the fee to their student accounts. The PCC has no relationship with any insurance company and cannot bill third parties for these charges.

Students requiring laboratory testing are referred to the Student Health Center. Charges for these tests are made in accordance with Student Health Center policies.

Confidentiality

Care provided at the Psychological and Counseling Center is confidential and in compliance with Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations. Only with explicit, written consent from the student may the PCC communicate with Deans, parents, or professors except in the case of an emergency in which safety is a concern.

HIPAA does have a clause that enables notification of families in the event that the student is in an emergency or life-threatening situation.

The PCC and the Student Health Center function as a team, and chart documentation is visible by approved health care providers at both sites.

Medical Excuse Policy

The PCC can provide students with cards documenting a visit to the PCC, upon request. Details of the visit are not provided.

There may be situations in which mental health concerns have a significant impact upon class attendance and performance. The PCC website offers detailed information regarding policies related to academic concerns at https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/pcc/policies-and-forms

If the student is hospitalized for mental health reasons, the team of providers at the hospital will work with the PCC to identify resources to support the student in the University setting.

Center for Student Well Being

The Center for Student Wellbeing cultivates engagement in lifelong wellbeing practices and endeavors to create a culture that supports students’ personal development and academic success through a holistic and integrative framework. The Center’s areas of focus include, for example, alcohol and other drug education and recovery support, self-care and personal growth, strengthening physical and emotional health, and support for supporting students in distress. The Center provides prevention programming, individual coaching, skill building workshops, substance use screenings, meditation and yoga, and referrals to campus resources. The Center also provides administrative oversight for the CARE Team and Welfare Panel, and coordinates the clearance and re-entry process for students returning from medical leaves of absence. 

Conduct Endangering Health & Safety

Students who engage in a pattern of conduct that endangers the health and safety of others may be required to participate and make satisfactory progress in a program of medical evaluation and/or treatment, or a program of psychological evaluation and/or treatment, if they are to remain at the University. The Psychological and Counseling Center, the Student Health Center, and the Center for Student Wellbeing make every effort to provide a mental health safety net to support students who are at risk for self harm or harming others. The University reserves the right to require the immediate withdrawal of a student whose continuation in school–in the University’s judgment–is detrimental to the health or safety of others. Students who withdraw–voluntarily or involuntarily–under these circumstances, may be considered for readmission following a finding by the University that the condition requiring withdrawal has been corrected sufficiently to remove the threat to others. The University maintains two primary means of institutional review for assessment and implementation of this oversight process.

A multi-disciplinary group of campus professionals (faculty and staff) the CARE Team meets regularly during the academic year to identify high-risk students and other students of concern, to monitor students’ progress, and to develop plans and recommendations for their safety and well-being. A major component of student care, the CARE Team serves as a support system for students.

Convened by the Dean of Students of the Dean’s designee, on an as-needed basis, the Welfare Panel addresses urgent situations of risk or threat to the health or well-being of the University community. The panel assesses urgent and potentially critical student situations from a number of perspectives to determine whether students might pose a threat to the health or safety of others in the University community. The panel develops an assessment for a student, reviewing past, present, and potential futures risk factors posing direct threats to the health and safety of the student or to the safety of others. The panel assembles pertinent information from relevant members of the University community, and is empowered to withdraw students who pose sufficient risk to the welfare of the University community.

The panel comprises the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee, appropriate Center for Wellbeing staff, the Director of the Student Health Center, the Director of the Psychological and Counseling Center, an academic dean from the school in which the student of concern is enrolled, a representative from the Office of General Counsel, and other specifically-designated, relevant personnel as may be needed.

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Student Records (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act)

Vanderbilt University is subject to the provisions of federal law known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (also referred to as FERPA). This act affords matriculated students certain rights with respect to their educational records. These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review their education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the University Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the University Registrar does not maintain the records, the student will be directed to the University official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of any part of their education records that a student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students who wish to request an amendment to their educational record should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the student will be notified of the decision and advised of his/her/their right to a hearing.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records to third parties, except in situations that FERPA allows disclosure without the student’s consent. These exceptions include:

FERPA provides the University the ability to designate certain student information as “directory information.” Directory information may be made available to any person without the student’s consent unless the student gives notice as provided for, below. Vanderbilt has designated the following as directory information: the student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, student ID photos, major field of study, school, classification, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weights and heights of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student, and other information that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Any student who does not wish disclosure of directory information should notify the University Registrar in writing. No element of directory information as defined above is released for students who request nondisclosure except as required by statute.

The request for nondisclosure does not apply to class rosters in online class management applications, or to residential rosters—or rosters of groups a student may join voluntarily–in online, co-curricular engagement applications, or rosters of other information on the websites of student organizations that a student may join. Neither class rosters in online class management applications, nor residential rosters in online co-curricular engagement applications, are available to the public. Students may configure their privacy settings in co-curricular engagement applications to further restrict availability of information in those applications.

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which students’ education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records—including Social Security Numbers, grades, or other private information—may be accessed without consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to student records and PII without consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution.

Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to education records and PII without consent, to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when the University objects to or does not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the third parties that they authorize to receive PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over the third parties.

In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without student consent, PII from education records, and may track student participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

Students who believe the University has failed to comply with FERPA may file a complaint using the Student Complaint and Grievance Procedures as outlined in the Student Handbook. If dissatisfied with the outcome of this procedure, students may file a written complaint with the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-5920.

Questions about the application of the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act should be directed to the University Registrar or to the Office of General Counsel.

Vanderbilt Directory

Individual listings in the online People Finder Directory consist of the student’s full name, e-mail address, and campus mailing address, if available. Students may elect to add additional contact information to their listings, including school, academic classification, local phone number, local address, permanent address, or cell phone, pager, and fax numbers.

Student listings in the People Finder Directory are available to the Vanderbilt community via logon ID and e-password. Students may choose to make their online People Finder listings available to the general public (i.e., viewable by anyone with access to the Internet), or to block individual directory items.

Students who have placed a directory hold with the University Registrar will not be listed in the online directory.

Students may report address changes, emergency contact information, and “missing person” contact information via the Web by logging in to YES (Your Enrollment Services) https://yes.vanderbilt.edu and clicking on the “Address Change” link.

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Study Abroad

In general, the policies and regulations in the Student Handbook apply to students registered for Vanderbilt study-abroad programs, and some additional regulations may apply. Students on academic or disciplinary probation, or those with a financial hold, may be prohibited from participating in study-abroad programs. Specific regulations for students enrolled in study-abroad programs are available from the program directors, from the Global Education Office, or from the offices of the deans of the undergraduate colleges and schools.

Provisions of the Student International Travel policy apply to students studying abroad.

The resident directors or faculty leaders of Vanderbilt study-abroad programs ("Vanderbilt-In-[country]" programs and short-term faculty-led programs) are responsible for academic matters. In consultation with the Dean of Students, or the Dean’s designee, they are also responsible for co-curricular and accountability matters, within the limits of the policies established by the University. (See “Conduct in Study-Abroad Programs,” in Chapter 3: “Student Accountability.”)

Students participating in University-approved, direct-credit programs administered by third-party providers (CET, CIEE, DIS, IFSA-Butler, IES, SIT, etc.), or direct-enroll/exchange programs at host institutions must abide by the conduct policies and regulations set forth by the institutions, in addition to the those in the Vanderbilt Student Handbook.

Students are required to abide by the laws of the respective countries in which they reside, study, or travel, with respect to the age at which alcoholic beverages may be consumed. Otherwise, the policies with respect to alcoholic beverages and controlled substances included in the Vanderbilt Student Handbook apply. Students are subject to accountability sanctions, including expulsion, and referral for prosecution for violation of these policies.

Undergraduate students enrolled in a University-approved study-abroad programs will not be charged the Student Activities Fee.

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Technology and Literary and Artistic Works

The rights and responsibilities of students and of the University concerning inventions, discoveries, rights in technology, and literary and artistic works, including patents, are defined in the Faculty Manual. For more information, visit Part III, section 4 of the Faculty Manual.

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Universal Waiver

In consideration of Vanderbilt University’s providing opportunities to participate in both academic and co-curricular programs and activities, students acknowledge the receipt and sufficiency of this consideration, and, by enrolling in Vanderbilt University, agree to release, relieve, discharge, and hold harmless Vanderbilt University, its officers, trustees, faculty, administrators, employees, representatives, and elected and volunteer leaders designated by Vanderbilt University, from any and all liability or claim of liability, whether for personal injury, property damage, or otherwise, arising out of, or in connection with, their voluntary participation in activities and travel associated with programs sponsored by the University or any of its departments, student groups, and other entities.

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University Calendar

The official University calendar is the Academic Calendar, which can be found online. Campus events may be found in the University Events Calendar.

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Vanderbilt Visions

Vanderbilt Visions is a first-semester, University core program of The Martha Rivers Ingram Commons. Following a curriculum of discussions and activities, small groups facilitated by faculty members and undergraduate peer mentors lead small groups of first-year students through weekly discussions of the Commons Reading as well as other topics related to addressing the academic, cognitive, social, and cultural transitions students may experience during their first semester at Vanderbilt University. All first-year students must observe the attendance policy of Vanderbilt Visions. Failure to do so may result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process.

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Chapter 2: The Honor System

Introduction / Statement of the Honor Code / Undergraduate Honor Code Pledge / General Information / Honor Code Violations / The Honor Code Applied to Preparation of Papers / Tests, Examinations, and Other Exercises / The Honor Code Applied to Group WorkTips for Success / Responsibility of the Individual Student / Undergraduate Honor Council / Student Advisers / Faculty Advisers / Procedures of the Undergraduate Honor Council / Hearings / Penalties / After the Hearing / Withdrawal from the University Before Hearing /

Introduction

The Vanderbilt Honor System was instituted in 1875 with the first final examinations administered by the University. Dean Madison Sarratt summarized the system as follows, “Let every individual who contemplates entering Vanderbilt University ask himself[/herself/themselves] first this important question: ‘Am I strong enough to give my word of honor and then live up to it in spite of every temptation that may arise?’”

The purpose of the Honor Code is to preserve and promote academic integrity. Ideally, a student’s personal integrity is presumed to be sufficient assurance that in academic matters one does one’s own work without unauthorized help from any other source. The Undergraduate Honor Council and the graduate and professional school Honor Councils are organizations that seek to preserve the integrity of the Honor Code at Vanderbilt University. Each council aims to secure justice for any student under suspicion of dishonesty, to vindicate his/her/their name if innocent and, if guilty, to protect the honor and standing of the remaining students.

The Honor System is only one of the elements provided to Vanderbilt students to aid in the development of creative thinking, intellectual maturity, personal accountability, and respect for honesty, integrity, and truth. The goal of the Honor System is to have all students leave Vanderbilt not only as graduates, but also as citizens of integrity.

Statement of the Honor Code

Vanderbilt University students pursue all academic endeavors with integrity. They conduct themselves honorably, professionally, and respectfully in all realms of their studies in order to promote and secure an atmosphere of dignity and trust. The keystone of the honor system is self-regulation, which requires cooperation and support from each member of the University community.

Undergraduate Honor Code Pledge

I pledge to pursue all academic endeavors with honor and integrity. I understand the principles of the Honor System, and I promise to uphold these standards by adhering to the Honor Code in order to preserve the integrity of Vanderbilt University and its individual members.

A short-form version of the Undergraduate Honor Code Pledge, to be signed on all tests, quizzes, and similar work is: “I pledge on my honor that I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this examination.

For information regarding additional Honor Code Statements and Pledges that may apply to graduate and professional students, please consult the individual school or college and its Honor Council.

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General Information

All students are required to acquaint themselves with the provisions of the Honor System through the information in this Handbook. Undergraduate students may obtain further information from the dean of each school, from the Undergraduate Honor Council at Vanderbilt University, PMB 351598, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235-1598, telephone 615 32(2-7868), from the Honor Council website, from the Honor Council adviser or from the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity. Graduate and professional students may obtain information from the office of the dean of their respective schools.

Undergraduate students are subject to the jurisdiction of the Undergraduate Honor Council. The policies and procedures of the undergraduate Honor System stated in this Student Handbook apply to all students enrolled in undergraduate courses—including those that involve , in whole or in part, online learning—of all the schools and the Division of Unclassified Studies, whether full-time or part-time, or whether regularly enrolled, transient, or cross-registered from a neighboring institution.

Graduate and professional students are subject to the jurisdiction of the student body that implements the Honor System in the graduate and professional schools: School of Graduate Studies Honor Council, Student Honor Council of the School of Medicine, Honor Council of the Law School, Divinity School Honor Council, Honor Council of the School of Nursing, Owen Graduate School of Management Honor Council, and Peabody Honor Council (for students in professional programs at Peabody College). Graduate and professional students must check with their individual schools or advisers for further regulations beyond procedures cited in this Handbook, which may affect their studies and observances of Honor Codes.

Students are responsible for obtaining from their professors an explanation of the freedom they may exercise in collaboration with other students or in use of outside sources, including:

In the event that a student does not obtain a clear explanation of the application of the Honor Code from an instructor in any class, the student must assume that the Honor Council will follow the strictest interpretation of the Honor Code with respect to that class. Ignorance of the Honor Code is not a valid excuse for violating it. 

Cheating, plagiarizing, or otherwise falsifying results of study is prohibited. The System applies not only to examinations, but also to all work handed in (including drafts), such as papers, reports, solutions to problems, tapes, films, and computer programs, unless excepted by the instructor. The System also applies to any act that is fraudulent or intended to mislead the instructor, including falsifying records of attendance for class, for events for which attendance is required or for which class credit is given, or for internships or other work service. Work in all courses—including those that involve, in whole or in part, online learning—is subject to the provisions of the System.

Honor Code Violations

Violations of the Honor Code are cause for disciplinary actions imposed by the appropriate honor council.

Possible violations include but are not limited to the following:

Note: Examinations and the questions therein, as well as lectures, teaching notes, scholarly writings, course handouts, assignments, and other course materials are the property of the individual faculty member. Copying or distributing any such materials without the permission of the copyright owner may constitute an infringement violation, and may result in a referral to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity for corrective action.

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The Honor Code Applied to Preparation of Papers

Students should understand that sources of common knowledge can be plagiarized. Generally, an idea is often considered common knowledge if it is encountered at least five times in separate sources during one's research into a particular subject. (Reprints of one source do not constitute separate sources.) Copying or close paraphrasing of the wording or presentation of a source of common knowledge constitutes plagiarism. What constitutes common knowledge may also vary by discipline so students should consult their instructors to determine whether a citation is needed. 

Students should realize that an act of plagiarism may include some degree of premeditation or may be the result of carelessness or ignorance of acceptable forms for citation. Regardless of intent or premeditation, the act is plagiarism and is a violation of the Honor Code. Students, therefore, must be conscious of their responsibilities as scholars under the Honor System, to learn to discern what is included in plagiarism as well as in other breaches of the Honor Code, and must know and practice the specifications for citations in scholarly work. The following examples illustrate the kinds of problems that can arise.

A student turned in a paper with the following paragraph:

“The characters in Othello are both allegorical and realistic at once. Characters like Iago and Desdemona are recognizable both as persons and at the same time devils, demigods and forces in nature. It is Shakespeare’s achievement as an artist that he is capable of creating visions of life as people live it at the same time that he is able to understand life in terms of social and cosmic symbols. In this paper I will discuss the allegorical elements in the play, the skeleton of ideas and actions with which the characters give meaning to the play.”

The instructor gave the paper to the Honor Council, citing this paragraph as evidence of plagiarism. The instructor presented the following paragraph from Introduction to “The Tragedy of Othello” by William Shakespeare, edited by Alvin Kernan. Copyright © 1963 by Alvin Kernan.

“Here is the essence of Shakespeare’s art, an ability to create immediate, full and total life as men actually live and experience it; and yet at the same time to arrange this reality so that it gives substance to and derives shape from a formal vision of all life that comprehends and reaches back from man and nature through society and history to cosmic powers that operate through all time and space. His plays are both allegorical and realistic at once; his characters both recognizable men and at the same time devils, demigods and forces in nature. I have discussed only the more allegorical elements in Othello, the skeleton of ideas and formal patterns within which the characters must necessarily be understood. But it is equally true that the exact qualities of the abstract moral value and ideas, their full reality, exist only in the characters.”

The instructor delineated four examples of plagiarism: 

(1) A change in wording:

STUDENT: The characters in Othello are both allegorical and realistic at once. Characters like Iago and Desdemona are recognizable both as persons and at the same time, demigods, devils and forces in nature.

KERNAN: His plays are both allegorical and realistic at once; his characters both recognizable as men and at the same time devils, demigods and forces in nature.

The instructor explained that this is plagiarism because the ideas presented in both cases are the same, with the student adding only a few of his own words to alter Kernan’s original phrasing.

(2) Use of a catchy word or phrase:

STUDENT: In this paper I will discuss the allegorical elements in the play, the skeleton of ideas and actions with which the characters give meaning to the play.

KERNAN: I have discussed only the more allegorical elements in the play, the skeleton of ideas and formal patterns within which the characters must necessarily be understood.

The instructor stated that this sentence constitutes plagiarism because the student used the catchy phrase “the skeleton of ideas.” Again, the student retains Kernan’s phrase and his ideas, changing only some of the wording.

(3) Undocumented paraphrasing:

STUDENT: It is Shakespeare’s achievement as an artist that he is capable of creating visions of life as people live it at the same time that he is able to understand life in terms of social and cosmic symbols.

KERNAN: Here is the essence of Shakespeare’s art, an ability to create immediate, full and total life as men actually live and experience it; and yet at the same time to arrange this reality so that it gives substance to and derives shape from a formal vision of all life that comprehends and reaches back from man and nature through society and history to cosmic powers that operate through all time and space.

This, the instructor said, was paraphrasing, and unless acknowledged, it is also an act of plagiarism. Students must clearly indicate each use of paraphrasing with a citation suitable to the instructor.

(4) Word-for-word copying:

STUDENT: . . . are both allegorical and realistic at once . . . recognizable . . . devils, demigods and forces in nature . . . the allegorical elements in the play, the skeleton of ideas . . .

KERNAN: . . . are both allegorical and realistic at once . . . recognizable . . . devils, demigods and forces in nature . . . the allegorical elements . . . the skeleton of ideas . . .

The instructor noted that had the student put Kernan’s words in quotation marks and properly cited them, there would have been no offense.

Plagiarism extends to preparation materials as well. For example, should the student forget to note on research cards the source of material and then fail to cite the source when the paper or report is prepared, the student is still committing a plagiaristic act. Not knowing how or when to cite is not considered a sufficient excuse. 

Proper Citation

Students are expected to follow the general rules of citation for each discipline. One citation is not sufficient if additional material from the same source is included in a student’s work. Citations should express the extent of ideas or expressions of others that are used. All direct quotes must be in quotation marks or in block quote format. Simply providing a citation without using quotation marks or block quote format is a violation.

Material found on websites or other Internet sources can–and should be–cited. Students should consult a citation manual or the course instructor for the appropriate format.

For further information about citation styles, refer to the Jean and Alexander Heard Library’s online guide to Plagiarism, Citation, Copyright, and Fair Use.

Any student who is uncertain about the application of the plagiarism and citation rules should consult the instructor. A student who plagiarizes out of ignorance is still guilty of an Honor Code violation.

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Tests, Examinations, and Other Exercises

Students are on their honor not to ask for or give information pertaining to any portion of an examination before or after they have taken it, in such a way as to gain or give an advantage over other students.

The written pledge (see also “Undergraduate Honor Pledge”.) signifies that the work submitted is the student’s own and that it has been completed in accordance with the requirements of the course as specified by the instructor. In addition, each student and faculty member is expected to establish a clear understanding of the requirements in each course.

Any student uncertain about the application of the pledge to a particular course requirement should always consult the instructor. The Undergraduate Honor Pledge, or an abbreviation thereof, should be included in all written work completed by the student and submitted for a grade. Any work handed in for credit, however, will be considered “pledged” unless otherwise stated by the instructor.

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The Honor Code Application to Group Work

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Tips for Success

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Responsibility of the Individual Student

Without the support and cooperation of the entire student body, the Honor System will not work. Students must insist on the absolute integrity of themselves and their fellow students. It is the obligation of every student who suspects an honor violation to take action in one of the following ways, determining the choice of action by the flagrancy and/or certainty of the violation.

If students have reason to suspect that a breach of the Honor Code has been committed, they must:

  1. Issue a personal warning to the suspected student, or
  2. Report the incident online to the Honor Council for action by the president, or
  3. Inform the instructor in the course of the suspicions and identify, if possible, the person(s) suspected.

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Undergraduate Honor Council

The Undergraduate Honor Council is an organization of students that seeks to preserve the integrity of the Honor Code at Vanderbilt University. It aims to secure justice for any student under suspicion of dishonesty, to vindicate his/her/their name if innocent, and, if guilty, to protect the honor and standing of the remaining students by his/her/thier punishment as set forth in the bylaws.

The members of the Honor Council are selected from all classes and all undergraduate schools. Members are chosen through a system that includes a written application, interview, and election. All Honor Council members must maintain at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA to remain in good standing.

The Honor Council elects its own officers during the last general body meeting of the fall semester. The officers include a president, who must be either a junior or senior and who must have previously served a minimum of one year as a member of the Honor Council; three vice-presidents; and up to three recording secretaries.

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Student Advisers

Every accused student will be assigned a student adviser from the body of the Undergraduate Honor Council. A list of all possible student advisers will be made available on the Honor Council website, and the accused student may select an adviser from it during the investigation and the hearing. The accused may also select an adviser from the University community: faculty, staff, or student. However, persons related to the accused or who have formal legal training are not eligible to serve as advisers.

An adviser accompanies the accused student to investigative meetings and the hearing and explains the procedures of the Honor Council regarding investigations, hearings, and the penalties that may be assigned. In addition, an adviser may confer with the accused during the investigation and a hearing, but may not speak directly with Honor Council members on the panel during the hearing.

An accused may separately obtain professional legal representation, advice, and counsel. However, an attorney may not participate in or be present during an Honor Council interview or hearing. The Honor Council is a student tribunal untrained in the law. An attorney representing an accused may work directly with the Office of the General Counsel.

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Faculty Advisers

The Chancellor or the Chancellor’s designee appoints faculty advisers to the Honor Council. The president of the Honor Council, or the Honor Council adviser, assigns one faculty adviser to attend every hearing. Faculty advisers may ask questions and participate in the discussion. In a full panel hearing, the faculty adviser does not have a vote in the outcome, but the faculty adviser does have a vote in the outcome of a small panel hearing.

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Procedures of the Undergraduate Honor Council

Proceedings of the Honor Council—investigations, interviews with potential witnesses, hearings, etc.—may be recorded by the University. Recordings not authorized by the Honor Council adviser or the Honor Council officers hearing a case, or by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee, are prohibited.

Investigation

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Hearings

If after an investigation, the Honor Council president determines that there is sufficient evidence to warrant a hearing, then a hearing will be scheduled. The investigator will arrange any details necessary for conducting the hearing, such as reserving rooms where the witness(es) and the accused may be placed during the hearing. The investigator will also inform the accused and the witness(es) as to the place and time of the hearing; however, the accused student is responsible for arranging the attendance of his/her/their character witness. The hearing should not be held earlier than seventy-two hours after the investigator has met initially with the accused unless an earlier time is agreed to by the accused. 

Attendance of the Hearing by the Accused Student

All students, including the accused student, are required to cooperate with investigations and at hearings conducted by the Honor Council. In the event an accused student refuses to participate in, or cooperate with, an Honor Council investigation or hearing, the hearing may take place without the participation of the accused student. All reasonable efforts will be made to inform the accused student of the time and place of the hearing and the findings of the proceeding. In addition, the accused student may inform the Council that he/she/they will not attend the hearing and submit a written statement regarding the charges.

Full Panel Hearing

A six-member hearing panel (consisting of a presiding officer and five members appointed by the president) will hear the evidence in the case. A faculty adviser will also be present. (For training purposes, observers may be allowed to be present, but may not speak or take part in the proceedings.)

1. Presentation of the investigative report.

a. The investigator is sworn in by the recording secretary.

b. The investigative report is presented: the interviews with the accuser, the accused student, and the witnesses are reported briefly and impartially; the material evidence is presented and explained without opinion.

c. The Honor Council may question the investigator. At no time does the investigator express an opinion as to whether the accused is guilty or not guilty.

2. Testimony. The accused student and the accuser are allowed to be present during the presentation of all testimony. If witnesses are to testify in person (as opposed to through written testimony), they will appear separately and await their appearances alone. When called, each (with the exception of the character witness) is sworn in by the recording secretary.

a. Accuser. If the accuser testifies in person, the presiding officer will invite a general account of the events in question. The Honor Council may then direct its questions to the accuser. The investigator may question the accuser, waiting until the Honor Council has concluded its questioning, to clarify points that may have been obscured. The accused may also direct questions to the accuser, once the Honor Council and the investigator have concluded their questioning. In the case of the accuser’s absence, the Honor Council will proceed to the testimony of the witness(es) and/or the accused student.

b. Material Witnesses. First, the presiding officer invites a general account of the events in question. The Honor Council may then direct its questions to the witness. The investigator may question material witnesses, waiting until the Honor Council has concluded its questioning, to clarify points that may have been obscured. The accuser and the accused may also direct questions to the material witnesses, once the Honor Council and the investigator have concluded their questioning.

c. Character Witness. One character witness may answer questions concerning the background of the accused. If a character witness cannot attend the hearing in person, he/she/they may send a written statement to the investigator to be read at the hearing. A character witness is not allowed to testify or express an opinion concerning the alleged offense. Discretion will be exercised to avoid questions that a character witness is not allowed to answer. Generally, a character witness will be asked the following three questions:

d. Accused Student. The presiding officer presents to the accused the charges and asks if he/she/they is familiar with the charges, the evidence, and the possible penalties if found guilty. The accused student enters his/her/their plea of guilty or not guilty. The presiding officer asks the accused to state his/her/their account of the events in question. The Honor Council may then direct its questions to the accused. The investigator may question the accused, once the Honor Council has concluded its questioning, to clarify points that may have been obscured.  The accuser may also direct questions to the accused, once the Honor Council and the investigator have concluded their questioning.

Small Panel Hearing

During the course of an investigation, an accused student who wishes to plead guilty may request a small panel hearing of his/her/their case. A case may proceed to a small panel hearing only if no facts surrounding the violation are in dispute and if the president determines that the likely penalty involves no more than one semester suspension. A guilty plea does not guarantee that the case will proceed to a small panel. If there are two or more students involved in a single case, all must plead guilty and request a small panel hearing in order for one to be conducted. If one of the accused students requests a small panel hearing and others do not, a full hearing must be conducted for all the students involved. In addition, if the student has a previous Honor Council conviction, a full panel hearing is required.

If an accused student informs the investigator that he/she/they would prefer a small panel hearing, the investigator will inform the Honor Council president of the accused student’s request. The president will review the investigative report and determine whether a small panel hearing would be appropriate. If a small panel would be appropriate, a date, time, and location will be chosen for the hearing.

A small panel hearing shall consist of a faculty adviser, the president of the Honor Council, and one additional member chosen by the president. At the hearing, the three panel members will be present, along with the investigator, the accused student, his/her/their adviser, and a character witness for the accused if he/she/they so desires.

The procedures employed during a small panel hearing will be the same as those outlined above for full panel hearings.

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Penalties

When the Honor Council is satisfied that all pertinent testimony has been received, the accused student, the student adviser, and the investigator leave the hearing room so that the panel may deliberate. The panel will proceed to discuss and decide the question of guilt. The proof that a person is guilty of a charge must satisfy a “preponderance-of-the-evidence” (or, more-likely-than-not) standard. A majority of the six members of a full panel must vote “guilty” to find the accused guilty.

1.If the accused is found guilty, the Honor Council determines a fitting penalty based upon

(a) the flagrancy of the violation,

(b) premeditation involved in the offense, and

(c) the truthfulness of the accused throughout the investigation and the hearing

These three factors are ranked on a scale of low, medium low, medium, medium high, or high.

2. The presumptive penalty for a first offense is failure in the course. In certain circumstances, after reviewing the flagrancy of the violation, the degree of premeditation, and the truthfulness of the accused throughout the hearing and investigation, the Honor Council may, at its discretion, reduce the penalty on a first offense to include an Honor Council reprimand, with a recommendation for failure on the assignment, or increase the penalty to suspension for one or more semesters, or expulsion. The minimum penalty for a second offense is failure in the course and suspension for not less than a semester, and depending upon the severity of the violation, the penalty may be suspension for multiple semesters or expulsion. The penalty for a third offense is expulsion.

3. A small panel may assign a penalty no greater than failure in the course and suspension for one semester. Each penalty requires a unanimous vote of the small panel.

4. If, after review by, and at the discretion of, the Director of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, mitigating circumstances exist with regard to the commission of the violation in question, then the presiding officer will be provided relevant information and may introduce those circumstances to be considered in the discussion of penalty. Such circumstances may not relate to the possible ramifications of the panel's decision. 

5. Expulsion must be approved by a vote of at least five of the six panel members. (Note that for a third offense, a vote of guilty by five of the six panelists imposes a penalty of expulsion, automatically.) All other penalties require only a simple majority vote of the six members.

6. Decision. The accused, student adviser, and investigator are brought back into the hearing room for presentation of the Honor Council’s decision. After stating the decision, the presiding officer (and others) may talk with the accused. At this time it should also be explained to the accused that he/she/they has the right of appeal.

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After the Hearing

1. At the conclusion of the hearing, the chair will gather all the material evidence, investigative reports, notes, and other records of the investigation and hearing and place them in a file in the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity

2. If the accused student is found guilty or pleads guilty, written notice of the decision is sent to the following parties: (a) the accused student, (b) the accuser, if an instructor, or the relevant instructor(s) (in cases in which the accuser is not an instructor) (c) the dean of the school in which the student enrolled, (d) staff in the Office of University Registrar, (e) other relevant University personnel, and in cases resulting in suspension or expulsion (f) the parents of the accused student. A copy of the notice must also be kept in the permanent files of the Honor Council.

3. Following a full panel hearing, a member of the Honor Council Executive Board will then prepare a summary of the proceedings.

4. The accused student may file an appeal from a full or small panel decision with the Appellate Review Board, but must do so within ten days of the date the student is formally notified of the panel’s decision. Detailed information may be found in Appeals and the Appellate Review Board, below.

5. The Honor Council adviser maintains records of Honor Council proceedings and investigations in the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity in accordance with the office’s document retention policy.  Records will not be released outside the University absent a written release from the student or unless otherwise required by law in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). However, students should be aware that they may be required to sign a waiver when applying to graduate or professional schools or in the course of any employment or governmental background check.

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Withdrawal from the University Before Hearing

If a student who has been reported for a suspected violation of the Honor Code withdraws from the University before a hearing has been conducted, the fact will be recorded by the Honor Council. A letter will be sent to the accused stating that he/she/they is suspected of an Honor Code violation, that an investigation has been or will be conducted, and that a hearing may be held.

The accused may respond in one of three ways: return to the campus for a hearing, waive the right to give testimony personally, thereby acknowledging that the hearing may proceed in his/her/their absence, or waive the right to appear and send a written, signed statement to be presented on his/her/their behalf at the hearing. Failure by the accused to respond will be considered a waiver of the right to appear.

During the time prior to the hearing, a notation will be placed on the academic record of the accused stating that an Honor Council case is pending. A letter will also be sent to the Office of the University Registrar the dean of the school in which the accused was enrolled, and other relevant University personnel, indicating that an Honor Council case is pending. If the accused attempts to re-enroll before the case is heard, the registrar will notify the president of the Honor Council. The case must be resolved before the accused may re-enroll.

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Chapter 3: Student Accountability

Violation of University Policy / Threat, Harassment, Intimidation, Etc.: Stay Away Orders / Fireworks, Firearms, Other Weapons, and Explosives / Damage to Property / Hazing / Conduct at Athletic Events / Conduct in the Libraries / Conduct in Study-Abroad Programs / Use of University Computers and Data Networks / Use of the University Telephone System / The Accountability System / Jurisdiction / Accountability Procedures / Appeals and the Appellate Review Board / Sanctions /

Although the University values personal freedom, celebration, and recreation, the policies and regulations that apply to student conduct at Vanderbilt are also informed by principles that value the health, safety, and well-being of students and other members of the University community, as well as their academic and personal success. The University’s goal in establishing policies and holding students accountable for complying with them is to help students understand how their choices can affect not only their immediate neighbors, but also the University community as a whole.

When students fail to meet University standards, they ultimately risk separation from the University community. Vanderbilt’s system of graduated sanctions and structured accountability action plans is designed to effect students’ voluntary compliance with the policies and regulations established to protect themselves, other students, and the community. Vanderbilt hopes that educational conferences, deferred probations, and probationary periods with accountability action plans will be sufficient to help students make better choices so that separation from the community never becomes necessary.

Violation of University Policy

Students and student organizations are expected to comply with all University policies, which are derived from tradition and evolve with contemporary practice. Ignorance of a policy is not a valid excuse for violating it. Grounds for corrective action cannot always be the subject of precise statement; however, when commonly held standards of conduct are broken, students must be held accountable if the University community is to be sustained.

Students are subject to corrective action when, individually or as members of a group, they violate University policy, rules, or regulations, including but not limited to the following:

Organizations or individual hosts are responsible for the conduct of their members and/or guests, and students are responsible for what occurs in their rooms or residences, both financially and in terms of misconduct by guests. These responsibilities include compliance with federal, state, and local law and University policies. Those who fail to meet these responsibilities will be subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process, and/or referral for prosecution by government authorities.

Violations of regulations of residences, libraries, resource centers, Traffic and Parking, Mail Services, and other areas of University life may also result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process. For further policies pertaining to campus residences, see Chapter 4,Residential Life”.

Schools, departments, programs, and individual faculty members, speakers, and artists may have policies governing the creation, use, and/or distribution of recordings—video or audio—of lectures, speeches, performances, and other activities. Individuals must obtain authorization prior to recording such activities, and to abide by the various policies governing their being recorded. Failure to abide by recording policies may result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process. In addition, examinations and the questions therein, lectures, teaching notes, scholarly writings, course handouts, assignments, and other course materials are the property of the individual faculty member. Copying or distributing any such materials without the authorization of the copyright owner may constitute a copyright infringement violation.

The Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee may initiate corrective action, institute restrictions on, or withdraw registration from organizations that violate University policy and regulations, and may also impose restrictions or require conditions be met by organizations that are found to be in violation of policy.

Students and student organizations are expected to observe the standards and policies of the University both on and off campus. An organization may be subject to corrective action including the loss of its registration, or, individuals may also be subject to corrective action for incidents that occur off campus.

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Threat, Harassment, Intimidation, Etc.: Stay Away Orders

Vanderbilt University expects students to refrain from conduct that threatens, intimidates, harasses, or otherwise unreasonably impairs the security or privacy of another member of the University community by any means, including through the use of electronic communications, social media, computers, or data networks, or by recording unauthorized video or photographic images in a location in which the other community member has a reasonable expectation of privacy, or by publishing such images . Such conduct is a violation of University policy and may result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process.

A student who feels that he/she/they is the target of such threat, harassment, intimidation, etc., may request from the Director of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, or the Director’s designee, stay away order to the identified student to cease further communication and/or desist from the conduct in question. When a request is filed, the Director or the Director’s designee will determine whether the alleged conduct warrants the issuance of a stay away order prohibiting the continuation of the conduct, and when it does, will issue stay away orders to the involved students. The Director or the Director’s designee may also impose other appropriate restrictions. Any charges brought at the time the stay away order is requested will be resolved in the same manner as any other violation of policy.

Violation of a stay away order by the student who is subject to the order will result in the filing of a charge against that student. This charge will be addressed according to the usual accountability procedures. The accountability meeting will be conducted by the authority that issued the order. If the accountability proceedings result in a finding that the student is responsible for violating the order, corrective action will be taken.

The determination of whether a stay away order should be issued, and any stay away order that may be issued, will not be considered an accountability proceeding for purposes of the student's record unless separate charges are brought and addressed in an accountability meeting. A subsequent accountability meeting to address whether the student has violated the terms of an order will constitute an accountability proceeding in the ordinary sense of that term and will become a part of the student's record to the same extent that any other accountability proceeding would become part of the record.

Harassment of any individual based on sex (see Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence”), race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, or disability is unacceptable and may be grounds for corrective action, and may also constitute a violation of federal law. Equally unacceptable within the University is the harassment of any individual on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, or harassment because of one’s perception of another’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

The policies and procedures governing cases involving sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence, including stalking, dating violence, and domestic violence, may be found in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”

The Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action and Disability Services office (EAD) handles complaints regarding other types of harassment as well. Upon receipt of a written complaint, an investigation will be conducted. After evaluating the specifics of the complaint, the EAD will issue a finding to the appropriate University official and seek to resolve the matter, usually within ninety (90) work days of receipt of the written complaint. In cases in which a student chooses not to file a formal complaint, the University may still take appropriate action being mindful of the complainant's desire for privacy. The University is committed to protecting those filing complaints from retaliation.

Other campus offices such as Housing and Residential Education, the Project Safe Center, the Center for Student Wellbeing, the LGBTQI Life office, the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center, Inclusion Initiatives and Cultural Competence , The Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life, and the Psychological and Counseling Center are available to provide counseling and support to students who believe they have been subjected to harassment.

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UPDATED: 08/25/2016:

Fireworks, Firearms, Other Weapons, and Explosives

The use or possession of fireworks, firearms, other weapons, explosives, or any type of ammunition on University premises is prohibited, with the exception that Vanderbilt University complies with Tennessee Code TCA 39-17-1313. In accordance with TCA 39-17-1313, the holder of a valid handgun carry permit recognized in Tennessee may transport and store a firearm or firearm ammunition in the permit holder’s motor vehicle if:

  1. The permit holder’s vehicle is parked in a location where it is permitted to be; and
  2. The firearm or ammunition being transported or stored in the vehicle:

Student use or possession of these materials is prohibited off campus, as well, when such use or possession is illegal or may endanger the health or safety of members of the University community, or the community at large.

Sports weapons must be kept in the custody of the Vanderbilt University Police Department, which is open twenty-four hours a day. It is a felony in the state of Tennessee to carry a weapon on a campus for the purpose of going armed. Air rifles and “BB” guns are considered to be firearms, the use and possession of which are prohibited on campus. The use and possession of realistic-looking or imitation firearms, which may include water guns, paintball guns, etc., is also prohibited.

The use or possession of stun guns, flying Tasers, cattle prods, liquid stun guns, or other devices designed to disrupt the human neurological system for the purpose of incapacitation is prohibited. The use or possession of any other device, object, or substance (or imitations and facsimiles thereof), designed to cause injury, or the use of any object capable of being a weapon as a weapon is also prohibited.

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Damage to Property

Damage, vandalism, littering, or theft of University property or property of a University community member or campus visitor by a student or student groups may result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process as well as the responsible student(s’) being held financially responsible for the cost of repair or replacement.

For example, a student may leave a window open during cold weather causing burst pipes and the flooding of student rooms and common areas. Or, a student may cause a fire triggering the building’s sprinkler system causing both water and smoke damage to student rooms and common areas. In these cases, the students committing the acts may be held responsible not only for accountability purposes, but also for the financial losses suffered by other students and the University resulting from these events. Students may be held financially responsible for damages or losses resulting from accidents or negligence. Students who suffer losses under such circumstances must take their claims to their own homeowners or renters insurance carriers. These companies may subrogate the claims to the carrier of the responsible student’s insurance.

(Note: Among the most common occurrences is water damage caused by the triggering of interior sprinklers as a result of horseplay, or hanging objects from sprinkler heads.)

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Hazing

State law requires each college and university in Tennessee to adopt a policy prohibiting hazing. Hazing is defined in the law as “any intentional or reckless act in Tennessee on or off the property of any [college or university] by one (1) student acting alone or with others which is directed against any other student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of that student, or which induces or coerces a student to endanger the student's mental or physical health or safety. Hazing does not include customary athletic events or similar contests or competitions, and is limited to those actions taken and situations created in connection with initiation into or affiliation with any organization.”

While including the statutory limitations of hazing above (i.e., student acts directed at students on or off campus), the University expands its definition of hazing to include any act that may produce, or is intended to produce, mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule, or any acts that are humiliating, intimidating, or demeaning, or that endanger the health and safety of another person. Such acts include—but are not limited to—paddling in any form, inducement of excessive fatigue, required exercise inconsistent with the mission of the organization, or physical or psychological shocks; personal servitude; implementing or participation in treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, or road trips that are not pre-approved by the appropriate University office; publicly wearing apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste; engaging in public stunts, morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; forced or coerced consumption, drinking games, or, other organized activities, late work sessions, and other obligations which interfere with scholastic purposes of the organization; and any other activity inconsistent with the purposes of the organization’s constitution, by-laws, standing rules and policies, or University policy. Students are subject to federal, state and local laws, and policies and regulations of the University.

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Conduct at Athletic Events

The University prohibits the throwing of objects from the stands and abusive language or gestures at athletic events. Student spectators who throw objects at athletic events will be ejected from the contest and may be subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process. Other spectators will be treated similarly by local authorities. The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited at athletic events, as is the use of tobacco, electronic smoking devices, and other nicotine delivery systems.

Fan Access Policy

The Southeastern Conference Fan Access Policy states: “In all sports, access to the competition area shall be limited to participating student-athletes, coaches, officials, support personnel and properly-credentialed individuals, at all times. For the safety of participants and spectators alike, at no time before, during or after a contest shall spectators be permitted to enter the competition area.” Students violating this policy–including by rushing a court, field, or other competition area–are subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process, and may be required to pay a fine. In addition, individuals who improperly enter the competition area may be expelled from the facility, arrested for trespassing, or lose future ticket privileges.

Signs, Banners, and Artificial Noisemakers

Students may paint themselves, using the common names for Vanderbilt teams (e.g., Dores, Vandy, VU). Students and/or registered student organizations may submit banners to be displayed at the game to the appropriate Student Athletics official, prior to the game. Banners with obscene, offensive, or derogatory messages—as determined by Student Athletics personnel–will not be displayed. Efforts will be made to display all banners submitted and approved. Students are permitted to bring hand-held signs to athletic events provided that the signs meet the following guidelines:

  1. The signs must be no larger than one piece of standard-size poster board (22″ x 28″);
  2. Signs may not display abusive, offensive, or obscene words or drawings—as determined by Student Athletics personnel; and
  3. Names of commercial products other than the official broadcast networks of the contest may not be mentioned on the sign.
  4. Dry erase boards and the like are prohibited. Signs must be completed and approved prior to the event, and may not be changed once approved.

Event staff has the discretionary authority to determine whether a sign meets the guidelines. Signs that do not meet these guidelines may be confiscated at any time during the event. Students in possession of a sign that does not meet the guidelines may be ejected from the contest if they refuse to comply with the policy stated above.

Artificial noisemakers (cowbells, vuvuzelas, inflatable balloon-stick clappers, etc.), are prohibited at any athletic event, with the exception of musical and percussive instruments used by official team bands in accordance with South Eastern Conference regulations.

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Conduct in the Libraries

The Jean and Alexander Heard Library seeks to create a welcoming, comfortable, and safe environment for its users. The library is a place for learning and reflection, and the library staff supports these efforts by providing helpful, responsive, and knowledgeable service. Mutual courtesy and respect among users and staff are essential to the University’s educational mission, and the role the library serves in fulfilling it. Among the library’s most important goals is to create a setting where its users feel free to pursue research and study without compromising their privacy or safety. The various libraries comprising the Jean and Alexander Heard Library system provide a variety of spaces for quiet study. Collaborative study spaces are also offered, which enable conversation and interaction among students. Library users are asked to be courteous to others, and to be aware of the potential impact of their conversations and use of electronic devices in open areas. All conduct should contribute to the research and scholarship of the Vanderbilt community.

More information about Library policies may be found on the Library website.

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Conduct in Study-Abroad Programs

Students who participate in Vanderbilt University study-abroad programs are representatives of Vanderbilt, and their respective countries, for the duration of the specific programs in which they are enrolled, and for any period immediately before or after that, should they extend their respective visits abroad. Participants are expected to conduct themselves appropriately and respectfully, and to abide by the policies and regulations set forth by the University, the Global Education Office (GEO), their respective program directors, on-site program staff, study-abroad program providers, the host foreign institutions (in the case of exchange and direct-enroll programs) and facilities in which they reside. Students are also expected to abide by the laws and customs of the countries in which they are studying or traveling. In addition, provisions of the Student International Travel policy apply to students studying abroad.

Given the nature and function of study-abroad programs, student-participant adherence to policies, procedures, and directives is crucial. The paragraphs, below, set out the accountability process for resolving alleged violations of program and University policies, procedures, and guidelines by Vanderbilt study-abroad participants.

Should there be an allegation of a violation of policy, resident directors or faculty leaders of Vanderbilt-administered study-abroad programs may conduct investigations and hold accountability meetings for conduct matters that occur abroad. Resident directors and faculty leaders may consult with GEO and the Dean of Students (or the Dean’s designee) throughout the process. At the discretion of the Dean of Students (or designee) and in consultation with the resident director or faculty leader, the Dean of Students (or designee) may assume jurisdiction for, and render a decision on, any cases involving students abroad. Cases involving sexual misconduct or intimate partner violence, including domestic violence, and dating violence during study-abroad programs must be addressed according to the policies and procedures outlined in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”

The resident director or faculty leader will interview or receive statements from all witnesses, and will present the identified student with the allegations, which are to include the specific regulation or policy allegedly violated. At the accountability meeting, the student presented with allegations may testify personally and present witnesses on his/her/their behalf. The student may examine all information that may form the basis for corrective action.

The student may present testimony and make arguments not only with regard to the offense, but also with regard to justification or mitigating circumstances. The student may also speak to the question of the appropriateness of any particular corrective action or sanction that he/she/they may incur. The decisions of the Vanderbilt resident director or faculty leader will be based on information presented and statements taken and will be made using a preponderance-of-the-evidence standard.

If the student is found responsible for a violation of applicable policies or regulations, the finding will specify the violating behavior and the policy or regulation violated, and the corrective action to be taken. The decision will be delivered to the student promptly, and take effect immediately. Due to the logistical challenges presented by conducting investigations at some distance from campus, findings made by resident directors or faculty leaders in accountability proceedings conducted for students in study-abroad programs are final.

The office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity holds concurrent jurisdiction and may take further action upon the student’s return to the University. For non-Vanderbilt students, the student’s home institution may also be notified of any policy violations and corrective actions taken by Vanderbilt resident directors or faculty leaders.

Students enrolled in study abroad programs not directly administered by Vanderbilt (i.e. direct enroll or exchange programs, or programs operated in conjunction with third-party providers) are subject to accountability proceedings as outlined by the relevant program or institution. Generally speaking, these institutions will inform and work with the Global Education Office and the GEO will in turn inform and work with the Vanderbilt office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity to investigate and respond to alleged violations of policies or regulations.

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Use of University Computers and Data Networks

Students, faculty, and staff are expected to comply with The Computing Privileges and Responsibilities Acceptable Use Policy. Among other things, this policy prohibits violation of copyright laws, including illegal file sharing, the transportation of obscene materials across state lines, and unauthorized access to private information, whether obtained through direct “hacking” or by “social engineering” methods. In addition to sanctions through University accountability proceedings, computing and data network privileges may be revoked in appropriate circumstances.

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Use of the University Telephone System

Students should identify themselves to the persons called on the telephone and may not use the telephone system to harass another by threats, obscenities, or repeated calls in which they fail to identify themselves. Examples of improper use of the telephone include the following: calling repeatedly and breathing or not speaking into the telephone receiver; describing sexual activity without identifying oneself; and anonymously subjecting the listener to obscene names. Harassment by telephone is a violation of state law and will subject the caller to criminal prosecution as well as corrective action through the University’s accountability process. Students who experience such calls should report the matter to a residential staff member, and/or, to the Vanderbilt University Police Department. Some harassment by telephone may be sexual harassment, as defined in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence,” and the policies and procedures outlined in that chapter should be followed.

Unauthorized use of the University telephone system with the intent to avoid payment of long distance charges is unlawful and may result in corrective action through University’s accountability process. Misuse includes the unauthorized acceptance of long distance collect calls, third party calls charged against the University, and use of a long distance authorization (V-Net) number not issued to the user.

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The Accountability System

Note: General provisions of the University’s Honor System, may be found in Chapter 2, “The Honor System.” Policies and procedures governing cases involving sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence are outlined in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”

The bodies that comprise the accountability system are the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, the Appellate Review Board, the Undergraduate Honor Council and the honor councils of the Graduate School and the professional schools. For matters specific to their areas, delegated to them by the Director of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, authority may also be exercised by the Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils, and Vanderbilt Student Communications, Incorporated. The nature of specific areas of authority is described in the constitutions or bylaws of each of these bodies.

In consultation with the Office of the General Counsel, the Dean of Students may assume jurisdiction for cases before the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity or any of the several Honor Councils. The Dean of Students also appoints students to the Appellate Review Board (acting as the Chancellor’s designee), and—under special circumstances—to the Undergraduate Honor Council. Such circumstances include the Honor Council’s inability to convene a hearing panel of elected members (perhaps due to to disqualification of members to sit on a given panel due to excluding criteria as delineated in the constitution and by-laws of the Honor Council). Students appointed by the Dean of Students to the Honor Council serve only for the duration of the circumstances that effected their appointments. The Provost, or the Provost’s designee, appoints faculty members to serve as advisers to the Honor Council. The Chancellor, or the Chancellor’s designee, appoints faculty members to the Appellate Review Board.

Rights of students or student organizations suspected of misconduct are addressed through the following procedures, which are designed to provide a fair process and just findings. The basic elements of the process are as follows:

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Jurisdiction

All persons enrolled in or taking courses at the University, or participating in programs and activities of the University as students, even if not registered primarily at Vanderbilt, as well as students on official leaves from the University (medical, personal, disciplinary, or otherwise), fall under the jurisdiction of the accountability system. This includes those taking part-time courses of study; participants in summer programs; participants in programs of the English Language Center; transients during the summer or other sessions; and students cross-registered from a neighboring institution. Accountability proceedings for these students are the same as for full-time Vanderbilt students. A notification of the findings of an accountability meeting will be sent to the appropriate officer of the institution in which the students are primarily registered.

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Accountability Procedures

The office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity has original jurisdiction in all cases of nonacademic misconduct involving undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Failure by a student to respond to notifications from the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity may be considered a waiver of the right to appear, and an accountability meeting may be held in the student’s absence.

The procedures provided herein apply to both individuals and groups. A student facing potential corrective action, or an officer in the case of an organization, will be informed in writing of a charge at least three days before an accountability meeting is held. Either may waive the three-day waiting period and request to proceed immediately following the presentation of the charge. The charge notice will include the specific regulation or policy allegedly violated.

The student or officer (hereinafter “student”) may testify personally and present witnesses on his/her/their behalf. The student may examine all information that may form the basis for corrective action. The student may present one character witness as well.

Given the nature of the University’s accountability process, the testimony of, and information derived from experts, such as reports of handwriting experts, will not be considered, except in rare circumstances. In those rare cases, determinations as to the appropriateness of testimony of or information derived from an expert will be made in the sole discretion of the Director of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity. Under no circumstances, however, will the use of polygraph examinations be permitted.

The student facing potential corrective action may choose a Vanderbilt faculty, staff, or student adviser who is not related to the student, and who has not had formal legal training (except in cases concerning students in the Law School), to accompany him/her/them during the accountability meeting. The adviser may not address the staff member, but may consult with the student during the meeting. No person who has a substantial interest in the case, or in a related case as a student facing potential corrective action, or as an adviser to such a student, may serve as an adviser. Persons not convened or summoned (e.g., the student, the student’s adviser, witnesses), by the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, are prohibited from attending an accountability meeting, and from being present at interviews during the course of an investigation.

Persons conducting the accountability meeting, and considering statements against a student facing potential corrective action (for example, statements in the student’s file), must advise the student of the content of the statements and give the student an opportunity to rebut inferences that might be drawn. The student may present testimony and make arguments not only with regard to the alleged violation of policy but also with regard to justification, and mitigating circumstances. The student may also speak to the question of the appropriateness of any particular corrective action or sanction.

The findings will be based on information presented at the accountability meeting. Information acquired through unauthorized searches will not be considered. A search of a student, a student’s possessions, or a student’s on campus premises may be authorized by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee if there is reasonable cause to believe that a violation of University policy is occurring or has occurred.

If the student is found responsible for misconduct, the finding will specify the acts of misconduct for which the student is responsible and the corrective action to be taken or the sanction to be imposed. The finding will be delivered to the student promptly and, at the time of its delivery, the student will be reminded of the opportunity to appeal and of the time limits and procedures involved in an appeal.

Accountability meetings may be recorded by the University. Recordings not authorized by the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, are prohibited. A written record of findings, corrective actions, and sanctions assessed must always be filed in cases resulting in corrective action. These elements become a part of the record and may be examined by the student in the case.

Investigations and accountability meetings are not publicized or open to the public. Accountability staff members must hold in confidence, the matters related to both the investigations and the meetings.

If a member of an accountability body has a conflict of interest, that member is ineligible to consider a case or to hear an appeal. Individuals with a conflict of interest must declare themselves ineligible. In addition, the specific body may, by a majority vote, declare any member ineligible due to a conflict of interest.

Students may be accountable to criminal and/or civil authorities as well as to the University for acts that constitute violations of law and of University policies and regulations. Students investigated for alleged violations of these policies and regulations are subject to University accountability proceedings delineated in this Handbook while criminal or civil proceedings regarding the same conduct are pending. Students in these circumstances may not challenge the University’s accountability process on the grounds that criminal charges or civil actions regarding the same incident are pending, may be initiated, or have been terminated, dismissed, reduced, or not yet adjudicated. When appropriate, the University may refer matters to federal, state, and local authorities for prosecution.

The policies and procedures governing cases involving sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence are outlined in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”

Procedures for the study abroad programs of the University are stated in the section on “Study Abroad” in Chapter 1.

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Appeals and the Appellate Review Board

The Appellate Review Board (the “Board”) is a University-wide body consisting of faculty and students appointed by the Chancellor (or the Chancellor’s designee) to review appeals from findings of administrative offices and bodies that have the authority to impose sanctions upon students in academic and co-curricular matters. The Appellate Review Board comprises two divisions: the Appellate Review Board for Academic Matters (for cases heard by Honor Councils), and the Appellate Review Board for Co-Curricular Matters (for cases heard offices and bodies that exercise accountability authority, with exceptions noted below). Information on the policies and procedures governing appeals in cases involving sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence may be found in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.”

The Appellate Review Board may also, in consultation with the University Office of General Counsel, the Dean of Students, the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity, and other appropriate University officials, review and propose updates of the procedures used by the persons and bodies whose findings are subject to appeal to ensure that students are treated fairly.

Appellate Review Board for Academic Matters

The Appellate Review Board for academic matters reviews appeals from decisions of bodies having the authority to impose penalties in academic matters.

Any Vanderbilt student, having been found guilty of a violation of the applicable honor code (the “Petitioner”), with resultant imposition of sanction by any of the following hearing bodies, may petition the Board for a review of the determination:

  1. The Undergraduate Honor Council;
  2. The honor council of any graduate or professional school

Appellate Review Board for Co-Curricular Matters

The Appellate Review Board for co-curricular matters reviews appeals from decisions of administrative offices and bodies having the authority to impose sanctions in co-curricular accountability matters. (Exceptions are noted, below.)

Any Vanderbilt student or organization, having been found responsible for a violation of University policy (the “Petitioner”), with resultant imposition of penalty by any of the administrative offices and hearing bodies, below, may petition the Board for a review of the determination.

Appeals involving cases of sexual misconduct or intimate partner violence are discussed in Chapter 7, “Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence.

Composition of the Board

The Board is composed of members appointed by the Chancellor (or the Chancellor’s designee), as follows: a Chair for each division–The Appellate Review Board for Academic Matters, and the Appellate Review Board for Co-Curricular Matters–who are members of the tenured faculty and who each may act in the other’s absence, disability, refusal, or inability to serve; and thirty-eight general members appointed by the Chancellor (or the Chancellor’s designee), who serve on both academic and co-curricular cases and who are faculty members at the rank of Assistant Professor or higher, selected from among the schools as follows: four from the College of Arts and Science, two from the Blair School of Music, two from Peabody College of Education and Human Development, two from the School of Engineering, and one each from the remaining six schools of the University. Two full-time students from each of the ten schools of the University also serve. Both faculty and students are appointed for two-year terms, which should be staggered to the extent practical, to ensure continuity.

Petition for Appeal

A petition for appeal, signed by the petitioning student or appropriate officer of a petitioning organization, must be submitted in writing, to the Appellate Review Board either by hand delivery to 310 Sarratt, or by email attachment to appeals@vanderbilt.edu, by no later than 5pm on the tenth (10th) calendar day following the date that the student or organization is formally notified of the determination of the administrative officer or hearing body.

Requests for extensions must be submitted prior to the expiration of the ten-day period. The petition must include the follow: a statement of the grounds for appeal, supporting explanation, and copies of, or reference to, all evidence the Petitioner asks the Board to consider. Except as explicitly provided below, no documents or other evidence may be included with an appeal unless previously submitted to the original authority.

The grounds for appeal are as follows:

Standards of Review

The standards for review used by the Board in considering the grounds for appeal are provided, below:

“Procedural irregularities sufficient to affect the finding of the original authority.” Original authorities are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with their policies and procedures. Deviation from those policies and procedures which render their actions fundamentally unfair constitutes a sufficient basis for an appeal to the Appellate Review Board. Procedural irregularities that are considered by the Board to be harmless and that did not, in the judgment of the Board, adversely affect the process, are not a basis for upsetting the determination of the original authority.

“Insufficient information to support the finding of the original authority.” It is not the role of the Appellate Review Board to substitute its judgment for the judgment of the original authority if there is a reasonable basis for that authority’s finding. Deference must be given to the judgment of the original authority, which had the opportunity to hear the witnesses and to assess their credibility and demeanor. The Board may not alter the finding of the original authority unless the determination of the original authority is clearly erroneous and cannot be reasonably supported by the information considered.

“New information that was not reasonably available for presentation to the original authority, the introduction of which would reasonably be expected to affect the finding of the original authority.” All available information, including testimony of witnesses, is expected to be presented to the original authority. Only on that basis can the authority reach fair and reasonable findings. A student or student organization that seeks to introduce new information has the burden of demonstrating that the information was not reasonably available for presentation to the original authority, and that the introduction of such new information can be reasonably expected to affect the finding of the original authority. If the Appellate Review Board determines that the student or student organization has satisfied this burden, the Board remands the case to the original authority with instructions to reconsider the case in light of the new information.

“Harshness of the penalty/sanction imposed by the original authority sufficient to show an abuse of discretion by that authority.” Again, deference should be given by the Board to the penalties, sanctions, etc., imposed by that authority. At the same time, the Board should recognize that an original authority can make errors in judgment sufficient to show an abuse of discretion. Abuse of discretion does not necessarily imply an intentional wrong or bad faith, but simply the failure to exercise reasonable judgment under the circumstances.

Consideration of Petition and Determination of Appeal

When the Chair of the appropriate Appellate Review Board (Academic or Co-Curricular) receives a petition, the Chair will instruct the original authority to notify all persons who were sent formal notification of the findings of the original authority that a petition for appeal has been filed and that penalties/sanctions of the original authority should not be implemented pending the result of the appeal, where applicable. A delay in implementation, however, does not preclude the University from taking interim actions to ensure the safety and security of the campus community.

Upon receipt of the petition, the Chair will also request from the original authority the entire record of the case, including, for example, test papers or other documentary information, summaries of witness testimony, and audio or video recordings of the proceedings. The Chair will then proceed to review the petition (including all supporting information provided by the petitioner), and the record, with all deliberate speed to determine whether the petition, when considered in the light most favorable to the petitioner, sets forth a basis sufficient to provide the relief sought by the petitioner. If the Chair determines that the petition does not set forth a basis sufficient to provide the relief, the Chair dismisses the petition (or such parts of the petition that the Chair has determined do not set forth a basis sufficient to provide relief). The Chair’s decision is final.

If the Chair determines that the petition (or parts of it) does set forth a basis sufficient to provide the relief, the Chair forwards a copy of the petition to the original authority with instructions to respond to it (or such parts of the petition that the Chair has determined set forth a basis sufficient to provide relief). The original authority provides its response to the Chair within ten (10) calendar days of receiving the Chair’s notification that the Board will hear the petition. Upon receiving the response from the original authority, the Chair sends the response to the petitioner offering the petitioner an opportunity to reply. Replies must be submitted within five (5) calendar days. The Chair forwards a copy of this response to the chair of the original authority for informational purposes.

From among the membership of the Board, the Chair selects three (3) faculty members and three (3) student members to serve on a panel (the “appeals panel”) to consider the petition. In the case of an appeal by an undergraduate student or undergraduate student organization, at least one student member of the panel will be an undergraduate student. In the case of an appeal by a graduate or professional student or a graduate or professional student organization, at least one student member of the panel will be a graduate or professional student from the school in which the petitioner is enrolled (in the case of a student), or with which the group is affiliated (in the case of an organization).

The Chair makes available to members of the appeals panel a copy of the petition and all supporting documents submitted by the petitioner. The panel’s consideration of the appeal must be based only on the records created by or provided to the original authority, the petition, any new information the Board determines should be considered, and all responses to the petition, and will be conducted in accordance with the standards of review outlined above.

After reviewing the record, the appeals panel, by majority vote, decides whether to affirm, modify, or reverse the finding of the original authority or to remand the case to the original authority with instructions. In cases where there has been a procedural error on the part of the original authority or the appeals panel deems that new information should be considered, the panel remands the case to the original authority with instructions. The panel's decision is final. 

Only in extraordinary circumstances would the Appellate Review Board ever reconsider an entire case de novo. In the event of reconsideration, standards of procedure are, in substance, those for original hearings and accountability meetings, but the Board may provide additional procedural rules, if necessary.

The Chair notifies in writing the petitioner and the original authority (which, in turn, notifies all persons who were sent formal notification of the original finding, where applicable) of the Board’s decision and the reasons for its decision.

While a case is pending, policy changes that might affect a case cannot be considered in the appeal.

At no time may the Chair or the Board substitute its own opinions or values for University policy.

No member of the Board may participate on an appeals panel if the member has a conflict of interest that might render the member’s objectivity questionable. Each member of the Board is responsible for determining whether a conflict of interest exists and may consult the Office of the General Counsel, if necessary. However, a member may be disqualified upon a motion by a member of the Board and by subsequent affirmative vote by a majority of the appeals panel. If a member of the appeals panel is disqualified, the Chair selects an alternate. If neither student from the petitioner’s school may serve on an appeals panel due to conflicts of interest, the Chair, of necessity, will appoint students from other schools.

Once a final determination has been made, all records of the original authority are returned to that authority.

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Sanctions

Vanderbilt’s system of graduated sanctions and structured accountability action plans, is designed to educate and effect reflection on the part of students and their organizations, as well as to effect students’ and student organizations’ voluntary compliance with the policies and regulations established to protect themselves, other students, and the community. Vanderbilt hopes that educational conferences deferred probationary periods and probationary periods will be sufficient to help students and their organizations make better choices so that separation from the community never becomes necessary.

Given the educational nature of University accountability proceedings, several factors are considered when determining sanctions and the components of an accountability action plan. In addition to a student’s or a student organization’s previous record, the circumstances surrounding the violation or infraction--such as the nature and severity of the event, the impact on others--may also be considered. Finally, a student’s or a student organization’s level of cooperation and honesty throughout the accountability process may inform the appropriate response to a policy violation.

The following is a list of common sanctions:

The following, although not exhaustive, is a list of common components of accountability action plans:

In all cases, accountability bodies have authority to establish various sanctions and accountability action plans appropriate to violations or infractions. Routine sanctions and accountability action plans may be established for certain infractions and may also be appealed to the appropriate body according to prescribed appeal procedures. Sanctions and accountability action plans may also be applied in combination. For example, a student may be suspended for one term and reenroll subject to restrictions (as in probation) for the next term. A student’s previous record may be considered when a sanction or accountability action plan is imposed. When sanctions and/or accountability action plans are indicated for a student organization, the group’s prior record may be considered in determining the appropriate sanction or plan.

Aggravated Offenses—Bias-Related Offenses

Sanctions for violations of University policies may be increased by one level of severity when it is determined that the violation was motivated fully or in part by discrimination toward the victim because of the victim’s–or the violator’s perception of the victim’s–race, sex, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.

Notification

If a student admits to being, or is found to be, in violation of University policy, the findings of the case, including any sanction, may be made known to appropriate persons, including, but not limited to, the complainant (only where applicable and as required by law), the appropriate academic dean, the faculty adviser, appropriate staff members, and/or the responsible student’s parents or guardian.

Upon completion of cases involving a sanction, the appropriate University official will take action to implement the decision of the accountability body, and the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled will be notified if the finding will affect the student’s academic status. However, action is normally not taken until the accountability process, including an appeal, if any, is completed.

Sanctions effective for an indefinite period are rarely imposed, but on occasions when they are, the accountability body imposing the sanction will consult appropriate University administrators to recommend the conditions that must be met to bring the sanction period to a close.

Withdrawal Before a Hearing

If a student who has been reported for an alleged violation of University policy withdraws from the University before accountability proceedings have been concluded, a notice will be sent to the student stating that he/she/they is alleged to have violated University policy, that an investigation has been or will be conducted, and that an accountability proceeding may be held.

The student may respond in one of three ways: return to the campus for the accountability proceedings, waive the right to give testimony personally, thereby acknowledging that proceedings may go forward in his/her/their absence, or waive the right to appear and send a written, signed statement to be presented on his/her/their behalf at the proceedings. Failure by the student to respond will be considered a waiver of the right to appear.

During the time prior to the proceedings, a notation will be placed on the student’s academic record, stating that accountability proceedings are pending. A letter will also be sent to the University registrar and to the registrar of the school in which the student was enrolled indicating that such proceedings are pending. If the student attempts to re-enroll before the matter is resolved, the registrar will notify the Dean of Students (or the Dean’s designee). The matter must be resolved before the student may re-enroll.

Withdrawal and Readmission

Students may leave the University involuntarily for academic failure, failure to meet financial obligations to the University, or circumstances outside the University’s jurisdiction. Withdrawal from the University under these circumstances does not constitute disciplinary sanction; therefore, re-enrollment after such withdrawal is handled through normal administrative processes. Students who voluntarily–or involuntarily–withdraw from the University for medical or mental/emotional health reasons must be cleared by the appropriate University officers before being permitted to re-enroll.

Disciplinary Records

Upon graduation or withdrawal from the University, student records in the office of Housing and Residential Education and the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity are maintained for a period of seven years, after which time they are destroyed. Records of students who are suspended or expelled from the University will be maintained indefinitely.

Student records will not be released outside the University absent a written release from the student or unless otherwise required by law, in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). However, students should be aware that they may be required to sign a waiver when applying to graduate or professional schools or in the course of any employment or governmental background check.

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Chapter 4: Residential Life

/ Student Housing / Residential Regulations / General Residence Life Policies /

The office of Housing and Residential Education provides a comprehensive development program for students living in University residential units. In partnership with faculty and staff from across the University, residential education professionals work to build a living-learning community where values of scholarship and leadership are nurtured in a culture of collegiality. Residential education staff effect interactions among students and faculty and support students’ scholarly pursuits. Values of civility, accountability, discovery, and celebration are at work in Vanderbilt’s residential community.

The office of Housing and Residential Education employs a compassionate group of upperclass, graduate, and professional students as resident advisers (RAs) head residents (HRs), graduate area coordinators, and program coordinators. Professional, in-residence staff supervise the student staff. The collective residence-life staff, in cooperation with Vanderbilt Student Government (VSG) and other campus partners, organizes and coordinates social, educational, and recreational programs throughout the residences.

Student Housing

The residential experience is regarded as an integral part of a Vanderbilt undergraduate education. The mission of the office of Housing and Residential Education is to provide the residential experience to as many undergraduate students as can be physically accommodated.

The Residential Requirement, established by the Board of Trust in 1952, states that “All unmarried undergraduate students are required to live in residence halls on campus during the academic year, May session, and summer sessions. Authorization to live elsewhere is granted at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments in special situations, or when space is unavailable on campus.”

In general, first-year students are housed separately from upperclass students. When there is insufficient space in the designated first-year-student housing system or in special situations, first-year students may be housed with upperclass students. All undergraduates make housing arrangements through the office of Housing and Residential Education in Branscomb Quadrangle.

First-Year Student Assignments

Procedures for first-year student housing assignments will usually be posted on the Housing and Residential Education website by no later than February 1, of the year in which students will enter the University.

Admission to the University does not guarantee assignment to a particular type of room or building. Further, the University population is fluid, and demand for housing may change considerably in a relatively short period of time. In circumstances in which the number of first-year students enrolled exceeds the number of spaces for first-year students in regular rooms, it may be necessary to house students in triple rooms, in single rooms, in upperclass areas, in apartments, or in alternative accommodations (such as study rooms on residential floors) for a few weeks, for a semester, or for the entire first year.

Sophomore and Upperclass Student Assignments

Returning unmarried upperclass students receive their housing assignments through a random selection process in the spring. Eligibility for participation in the random selection is determined by the Director of Housing Assignments with advice from the Vanderbilt Student Government.

Students who participate in any Vanderbilt study abroad programs, or who graduate, withdraw, or take a leave of absence, may request cancellation of their housing contracts by writing to the office of Housing and Residential Education, sixty days prior to the beginning of the semester.

Requests to Live in Off-campus Housing

Vanderbilt is a residential University. All unmarried undergraduate students — regardless of class standing or seniority — are required to live in on-campus residential housing unless the University grants a student authorization to live off-campus. The residential requirement is binding for the student’s entire undergraduate education. Therefore, off-campus authorization is a privilege, not a right.

Only students who have been authorized to reside off campus by the Director of Housing Assignments or the Director’s designee may do so. Students should not make deposits or sign leases until they receive written authorization from the housing assignments director to reside off campus. The office of Housing and Residential Education maintains an off-campus referral service (https://apphost1a.its.vanderbilt.edu/housing/Main/). Most of the rental property listed is close to the campus, but cost, furnishings, and conditions of the accommodations vary greatly.

Authorization to live off-campus is granted at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments and may be revoked at any time for good cause, as determined at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments. Reasons for the revocation of off-campus authorization include, but are not limited to, violations of University policies or regulations; failure to abide by the tenets of the “good neighbor guideline;” or behavior that adversely affects the University’s relationship with the neighborhood community.

When Vanderbilt receives notice of a landlord in a community whose practices are violating local law and/or endangering the safety and well-being of student tenants or neighbors, then Vanderbilt reserves the option of denying students the privilege of living off-campus at properties owned by such landlords.

If a student is living in an off-campus residence alone or with one or more other students or non-students, and the residence is found by the University to be in violation of the “good neighbor guidelines” or is adversely affecting the University’s relationship with the neighboring community, all residents may be considered in violation of the good neighbor guidelines even though a specific individual responsible for the conduct cannot be identified. A student whose authorization to live off-campus is revoked will be required to return to campus immediately and live in on-campus housing assigned at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments.

Students directed to return to on-campus housing will be charged, on a pro-rata basis, the standard University housing fee, effective the day assignment to on-campus housing is made. Authorization to live off-campus will be granted only on the condition that the student agrees that the University will not be liable or responsible for any contractual arrangements or agreement into which a student has entered, such as a lease agreement for off-campus housing, if authorization is revoked and the student is required to return to, and live in, assigned on-campus housing.

Requests to Live in a Fraternity or Sorority House

Students who want to live in fraternity or sorority chapter houses must file the necessary forms each semester, May session, or summer session with the office of Housing and Residential Education. Requests for residency in the chapter houses for the spring semester must be filed thirty days before the beginning of spring semester. During the academic year, requests to move from a campus residence to Greek housing cannot be granted unless accompanied by a request from a Greek house resident to move to the University residential system. A maximum of six officers, preferably of junior or senior class standing, may live in each chapter house. Approval to live in a Greek chapter house must be obtained from both the office of Housing and Residential Education and the office of Greek Life. Approval to live in a Greek chapter house is not equivalent to authorization to live off-campus.

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Residential Regulations

Rental

Rooms designated for students are rented (and students are liable for the room rent) for the entire academic year, exclusive of Thanksgiving break, semester break, spring break, and Commencement Week. Students who graduate or withdraw in the first semester are not liable for the spring semester rent if written notice is given sixty days before the opening of the spring semester. Students who graduate or withdraw from the University during the semester must vacate their rooms within twenty-four hours.

Students who withdraw for medical reasons may receive a pro rata refund. Students who withdraw or who are suspended or expelled during the semester may be entitled to partial refunds of rent. Rooms may not be sublet or used for any purpose other than as a residence for those to whom they are assigned. Residential rooms and services (data network, etc.) may not be used for business purposes. Student rooms may not be used for publicized events, including meetings of organizations, social events, etc.

Occupancy

Campus residences are generally open for occupancy on the day before registration begins for each semester, and close at 9am on the day following the last day of classes before holidays and at 9am on the day following the last day of examinations at the end of the semester. Campus residences generally reopen after holidays at 9am on the Sunday prior to the first day of classes. Following semester break, they open at noon on the Friday prior to the first day of spring semester classes.

Breaks

Campus residences are officially closed during Thanksgiving break, semester break, and spring break. Students are not contractually entitled to occupy their rooms during these periods. However, at the discretion of the Senior Director for Housing Operations or the Senior Director’s designee, students may occupy their rooms during these periods if they register to do so with the office of Housing and Residential Education. Prior to these breaks, students will receive notice of which buildings and floors may be occupied and instructions for registering to stay. Failure to register may result in exclusion from the residences and/or corrective action through the University’s accountability process. Residential houses on the Ingram Commons are not open during the week prior to commencement and first-year students may not register to stay after the conclusion of final examinations.

Commencement Week

Commencement Week housing is open only to graduating residents and students required by the University to be present. In all cases, residents authorized to stay for commencement must vacate the residence halls by no later than 1pm on the day following commencement.

By no later than 9am the day after their last spring semester examination, all residents–except graduating students and other students required to be present for commencement–must vacate their rooms and depart campus. Only graduating seniors may occupy their rooms during commencement week. Graduated students must vacate their rooms by no later than 1pm the day following commencement.

Other than graduating seniors, only students with official roles in sanctioned commencement events, whose residency has been approved in advance by the Director of Housing Assignments (or the Director’s designee), may stay in residence halls during commencement week. At the sole discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments (or the Director’s designee), such students may be required to move from their spring room assignment to a commencement-week assignment by 9am the day after their last examination and vacate their commencement week housing no later that 1pm the day after commencement.

Expiration and Termination

A room contract will be terminated upon a student’s graduation, completion of his/her/their program, or withdrawal or dismissal from the University. Under these circumstances, the student must vacate the apartment or room within twenty-four hours. Resident contracts may be terminated only when, at the discretion of Director of Housing Assignments, unanticipated and major changes occur in a student’s situation that would justify such termination. Contracts may not be broken to enable students to obtain lodgings elsewhere, or because a student has placed a deposit on, or signed a contract for, off-campus accommodations.

Check-In/Check-Out

Residents must check-in with residential staff when they arrive on campus. Residents will be issued a key and/or an access combination. The resident must complete and sign the online room condition report to document the initial condition of the room and its furnishings. A resident may be held responsible for any damage to his/her/their living space that is found when he/she/they moves out unless the damage was noted on his/her/their room condition report at check-in, is the result of normal wear and tear, or is the result of a properly-reported maintenance problem that arose during the year (please see Damage to Property under “General Residence Life Policies”).

As residents vacate their rooms, they must return their keys and schedule a check-out meeting with the residential staff to review and sign their room condition reports. Residents will be held responsible for all room damage and corresponding charges incurred between the check-in and check-out dates recorded on the room condition report. If the room condition report is not reviewed and signed, then the resident may be held financially responsible for all damages above and beyond those noted on the original room condition report.

Room Changes

Students may not move from their assigned spaces to other spaces without the prior approval of the office of Housing and Residential Education. Room change requests are granted at the discretion of the Director of Housing Assignments. Students who make unauthorized room changes are subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process.

Students who make unauthorized room changes will (1) not be permitted to reserve their current assignments for the following academic year; (2) lose a point for random selections for the following academic year; (3) lose a class in seniority for the off-campus authorization process for the following academic year; (4) be denied authorization to reside in a Greek House for the following academic year; or any combination of the above.

Gender

 

The University offers a variety of living accommodations for students of all sexual orientations and gender identities and expressions. Gender designations of buildings, floors, lodges, suites, or apartments are made on an annual basis. Single students who share bedrooms must be of the same gender, unless the University has designated the room for multi-gender occupancy. 

Room Entry

The University recognizes and respects the desire for privacy. Designated staff members are authorized by the University to enter any University premises. Authorization for entry includes, but is not limited to, custodial services, maintenance and repair services, and inspections. Staff conduct inspections for a variety of reasons that include–but are not limited to–fire and safety issues, health and welfare issues, maintenance or damage issues, and closing for breaks and end of an academic session. Although inspections are generally announced, circumstances may dictate that an inspection be unannounced.

Searches

A search of a student, a student’s possessions, or a student’s premises may be authorized by the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee, if there is reasonable cause to believe that a violation of University policy is occurring or has occurred.

Confiscation

During searches and inspections of residential units (rooms, suites, apartments, etc.), University personnel may confiscate items prohibited by University policy.

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General Residence Life Policies

The following policies and regulations are specific to residential living, and the University expects students to abide by these policies. Further, students are expected to govern themselves according to all University policies and regulations, as well as state, federal and local laws. The University reserves the right to make other regulations as necessary, without notice, to ensure comfort and safety. 

Care, Cleaning, and Repair of Rooms

Students are expected to keep their rooms clean. Students may be required to clean their living accommodations, including appliances, if the area coordinator or assistant director for the area determines that the room, apartment, or specific appliance presents a health or safety hazard. Inspections for damage and/or cleanliness will be conducted by University staff. Students are expected to clean rooms and appliances, sweep floors or vacuum, and remove all trash and personal items prior to vacating a room or apartment. The housekeeping staff will clean the bathrooms and general public areas of apartments and suites once each week.

Students are prohibited from painting their rooms and University furniture, including headboards. Adhesives (e.g., glow stars) are also prohibited. Pictures and bulletin boards may be hung only from the picture rail. (Hooks for picture rails may be purchased in the University bookstore.) Use of tape, staples, adhesive holders, screws, brackets, tacks, and nails is prohibited on the walls, woodwork, floors, ceilings or furnishings. Non-staining putty (e.g., UHU Tac and Scotch Removable Mounting Putty) may be used. The use of over-the-door hangers is prohibited due to the damage that these devices cause. Only tension rods may be used for curtains or other window treatments. 

Concrete blocks, cinder blocks, and bricks are prohibited from University residences because of the potential damage to walls, floors, and carpets caused by their use. Plastic crates are acceptable substitutes as long as their use does no damage. The height that one may elevate a standard bed is limited to 13″ from the bottom of the bedspring to the floor. Wooden “bed-risers” are permitted as long as they conform to the specifications established by the Director of Housing Facilities, and may be purchased at the University bookstore and from other authorized local vendors. Weightlifting equipment is not permitted in campus residences. Water beds, hot tubs, lofts, and bunk beds (other than those provided by the University), are prohibited. The unauthorized construction of walls and partitions in University housing is prohibited.

Satellite dishes and antennae may not be affixed to, or mounted on, any interior or exterior area of a campus residence in any manner or fashion.

Residences are heated and cooled by central systems. To conserve resources, residents should keep their windows closed. Heating or cooling problems should be reported to the area maintenance supervisor (AMS).

Residents are expected to maintain and leave the residence at checkout in the same condition of repair as it was when they checked in, normal wear and tear, excepted.

Students will be charged for any damage to rooms and public areas of campus residences, which results from misconduct or misuse. Charges for damages for which responsibility cannot be determined will be prorated among the residents of a residence hall or living unit. In order to control the quality of the craftsmanship in campus living areas, students may not make repairs to avoid damage charges. Residents should report needed repairs to the area maintenance supervisor (https://apphost2.its.vanderbilt.edu/housing/Facilities/Main/Request.cfm), the office of Housing and Residential Education, or the building’s residential staff members. The University will make all needed repairs and do all redecorating, including painting, at its discretion. Authorized University personnel may enter at any reasonable time, or in emergencies, to inspect and repair property and equipment or to investigate allegations of policy violations.

The common areas of suites, apartments, and lodges are intended as joint living space for the residents. Students are not permitted to use these rooms as bedrooms. Furnishings in these rooms may not be moved to individual bedrooms.

Damage, Collective Damage, and Liability

The University is not responsible for personal property and is not liable for damages to student property caused by vandalism, mischief, or other students’ negligence. The University is not liable for damages caused by electrical or mechanical failures or difficulties, or broken water pipes, unless, after being notified, the University fails to take reasonable means to correct the failure or difficulty. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange for insurance coverage for all valuables and belongings they bring to campus. Students should check the provisions of parent/guardian homeowners/renters insurance and/or consider obtaining personal coverage. See Loss of Property/Insurance Coverage.

Damage to Property

Damage, vandalism, littering, or theft of University property or property of a member of the University community, or of a campus visitor, by a student or student groups, may result in corrective action through the University’s accountability process as well as the responsible student(s’) being held financially responsible for the cost of repair or replacement.

For example, a student may leave a window open during cold weather causing burst pipes and the flooding of student rooms and common areas. Or, a student may cause a fire triggering the building’s sprinkler system causing both water and smoke damage to student rooms and common areas. In these cases, the perpetrators may be held responsible not only for accountability purposes, but also for the financial losses suffered by other students and the University resulting from these events.

Students may be held financially responsible for damages or losses resulting from accidents or negligence. Students who suffer losses under such circumstances must take their claims to their own homeowners or renters insurance carriers. These companies may subrogate the claims to the carrier of the responsible student’s insurance. (Note: Among the most common occurrences is water damage caused by the triggering of interior sprinklers as a result of horseplay, or hanging objects from sprinkler heads.)

Collective Damage

Damage and vandalism are costly and undermine the quality of life in the residential community. The University expects members of the residential community to aid in the prevention of vandalism. Residents are jointly and severally responsible for damage to their living units and furnishings, and are collectively responsible for damage to common areas.

Residents of a building, or part thereof, may be assessed charges for repair of damage to common areas.

Interruption of Services

Interruption or curtailment of services maintained in a residential building, if caused by strikes, mechanical difficulties, or other causes, does not entitle residents to any claim against the University or to any reduction in rent. Noise from service vehicles, construction activity, or other normal and necessary activities does not entitle residents to any claim against the University or to any reduction in rent.

Electric Appliances

Small items such as radios, sound systems, electric blankets, clocks, lamps, and coffee makers with enclosed heating elements are permitted in rooms, but no appliances with exposed heating elements, or grills (for either outdoor or indoor use, including “George Foreman” grills and like devices), are allowed. Appliances that draw a large amount of current from each circuit, such as hot plates, air conditioners, electric heaters, and instant water-heating elements, are prohibited. In addition, washers, dryers, and dishwashers are not allowed. Microwave ovens less than six years old, having a maximum power of no more than 800 watts and an interior capacity of no more than one cubic foot are permitted. Refrigerators less than six years old that have no more than a four-cubic-foot capacity may be used. The residential staff of a building may require that any appliance be placed in storage if the manner in which the appliance is used causes interruption of service or endangers the health, safety, or well-being of members of the residential community.

All appliances used in campus residences must be in good condition, with special attention given to seals, electrical cords, and plugs. Only power strips with circuit breakers may be used as extension cords. In consideration of fire safety, halogen lamps or light sources are prohibited in campus residences. The Senior Director for Housing Operations reserves the option of revoking authorization for the use of any appliance in individual buildings or throughout the residential campus.

Because the University provides ubiquitous wireless data network coverage in all its residences, consumer electronic devices that emit a wireless signal (routers, AirPorts, etc.), are prohibited, and settings for smartphone hotspots or wireless connectivity for printers, must be disabled. (See also “Wireless Data Network.”)

Furnishings

No University furniture, plants, or other furnishings, including those in lounges or reception areas, may be exchanged with anyone, stacked, or moved from one room to another. Headboards and footboards may not be removed from beds and University furnishings may not be removed from rooms. Anyone who moves furniture or mattresses without authorization will be responsible for the costs incurred in moving these items back to their proper positions (or the cost of repair or replacement, if an item is damaged or lost) and will be subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process. Doors and window screens may not be removed.

Student-owned furniture brought into campus residences and Greek houses must meet the hospitality/contract-grade furniture fire-safety specifications of either the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standard 260, or the California Technical Bulletin 117, section E. (Furniture that complies with either standard will be appropriately tagged by the manufacturer.) Student-owned furniture must be removed before the student checks out of his/her room at the conclusion of the period of occupancy. Failure to comply may result in the assessment of charges for removal as well as corrective action through the University’s accountability process.

Visitation and Overnight Guests

Visitation

Visitors are allowed in residences throughout the 24-hour day. However, residents must remain sensitive to the safety and security concerns of the residential community as well as the privacy needs of floormates/roommates/suitemates/lodgemates/apartmentmates. Prior to a visitor’s arrival, resident hosts should discuss with the persons with whom they share space, the fact that visitors are expected. Residents are responsible for the conduct of their visitors and violations of University policy may be referred to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards and Academic Integrity. Visitors (including other students who are do not have access to a particular building), should be escorted at all times when in the residence halls. Lending ID cards or room keys to visitors and sharing access codes are prohibited.

Overnight Guests

A student who wishes to host an overnight guest must complete a guest registration form located on the Anchor Link page of the appropriate residence hall or house. The request should be made at least 24 hours prior to the arrival of the guest. The relevant Area Coordinator will review the request and send a message regarding the status of the registration. Host students should seek the permission of roommates and others with whom they share space (suitemates, e.g.,) before completing the registration form. Guests’ stays are limited to three consecutive nights. Guests must be escorted at all times in the residences. Lending student ID cards or room keys and sharing access codes are prohibited. Residents are responsible for the conduct of their guests and violations of University policy may be referred to the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards and Academic Integrity.

ID Card Access Readers

Most campus residences have ID card access readers at one or several entrances. Access schedules vary by building and by entrance. For reasons of safety and security, students may not enable building access to persons they do not know to be residents of that building.Students may not be present in residence halls to which they do not have access unless they are visiting another student and are accompanied by the host student. A resident enabling building access to a student whom they are not hosting is not considered an authorized entry to the building for the entering non-resident student.

Lost ID cards should be reported immediately to  Vanderbilt Card Services, 184 Sarratt Center, 615-32(2-2273)—C-CARD on campus phones, on the Web at https://services.jsatech.com/login.php?cid=16, or to any facility that accepts the Vanderbilt Card, such as Campus Dining outlets or Varsity Markets. Lost cards may also be reported to the University Police Department at 615 32(2-2745).

Keys and Access Codes

Keys and access codes to residential rooms and other necessary keys, if any, are issued to residents upon check-in to their rooms. Residents may not duplicate keys or share access codes. No deposit is required, but if a key is lost or not returned when a room is vacated, the lock will be changed and the resident charged for the replacement. If it is determined that access codes have been shared, the code will be changed and the resident(s) charged for the change.

Linens and Laundry

The University does not supply towels, washcloths, linens, blankets, or pillows. Coin- and Commodore Card-operated washers and dryers are provided for campus residents in each of the seven residential areas.

Loss of Property/Insurance Coverage

Every student is responsible for his/her/their own property and should consider obtaining personal coverage or having coverage under his/her/their parent’s homeowner’s policy for items brought to campus. Coverage should include both losses of University property and losses of property owned by others, that a student may cause.

Music Practice Rooms

Certain rooms in campus residences have been designated for use as music practice rooms. Due to their proximity to residential space, their use requires policies that preserve the quiet of the halls for the residents. Policies and specified times for the use of these spaces will be posted in each space. Except for University-supplied pianos, no amplified or percussion instruments are permitted. Use of these rooms for music practice may be terminated by the office of Housing and Residential Education.

Party Registration

Gatherings in residential spaces with alcohol present must be registered, regardless of their size. Gatherings with alcohol are permitted only in Warren | Moore suites, Carmichael Towers East suites, Carmichael Towers West, Mayfield Place, Chaffin Place, Morgan House, and Lewis House. All gatherings must abide by all other University and residential policies (noise, alcohol, visitation, etc.). The registration form is located on each residence hall’s individual Anchor Link page. Registrations should be submitted no later than 24 hours prior to the proposed event. The form, once submitted, is sent to the Area Coordinator for approval.

Pets

Students may not have pets and other animals in University residences. Students are also prohibited from keeping or providing for animals on University property, and visiting animals must be kept outdoors and leashed. Students who violate this policy are subject to corrective action through the University’s accountability process, and will bear any associated costs in rooms where animals are found in violation of this policy. Fish may be kept in aquariums, but flesh-eating and dangerous fish (e.g. piranha) are prohibited.

Policy Violations

Students who are found to be in violation of University policy may be required to change room assignments or vacate University housing as directed by the office of Housing and Residential Education.

Quiet Hours

Quiet hours are in effect from 7pm until 7am., Sunday through Thursday, and midnight until 10am, Friday and Saturday. During these hours, residents must cease all activities that might disturb study or sleep. Radios, televisions, etc., should be turned to low volume and other noisy activity curtailed. During reading and examination periods, quiet hours are in effect 24 hours a day. In addition, the residents may vote to alter quiet hours, in accordance with the provisions for residential autonomy. Non-quiet hours are not “noisy” hours. “Courtesy” hours are in effect 24 hours a day.

The use of electric guitars, other amplified instruments, drums, and other instruments producing loud volume, is prohibited in campus residences.

Because of their propensity to be heard and felt through solid materials, subwoofers in stereo speakers or other audio equipment are also prohibited.

Safety and Fire Prevention

Residents must abide by the fire safety practices and regulations listed below:

Safety and Security

Residents must abide by the safety and security practices and regulations listed below:

It is essential that residents cooperate with the University in every way to safeguard the residential community and the belongings of residents. Students should keep their room doors locked, keep money and other valuables out of sight, and report thefts and suspicious persons immediately to their head residents, resident advisers or the Vanderbilt University Police Department.

Periodically, officers from the Vanderbilt University Police Department may enter campus residences, Greek houses, and other campus facilities to assess their safety, security, and compliance with University policies.

Security Checks

At certain hours, students may be required to show Vanderbilt identification to gain entrance to campus residences. (See also “ID Card Access Readers.”)

Smoke-Free Campus

Vanderbilt University is a smoke-free campus. Smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes, vaporizers, etc, are prohibited in all buildings on campus, including University residence halls and Greek chapter houses, and on the grounds of the campus with the exception of designated outdoor smoking areas. Locations of additional designated smoking areas for campus residents may be found at http://cpc-fis.vanderbilt.edu/mapping.html.

Greek organizations may elect to designate outdoor smoking areas on their house grounds.

Designated smoking areas will be marked with signs and include cigarette urns for disposal.

Vanderbilt University is committed to providing a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment and offers several resources for smoking cessation. “Quit Kits” can be obtained free of charge from the Center for Student Wellbeing, and links to other resources can be found on its website.

Solicitation in Residential Units

In general, solicitation in campus residences is prohibited. Room-to-room solicitation for any reason is not allowed. Those students or student organizations who wish to organize clothing, food, blood, book, or other drives in the residence halls must request authorization from the Senior Director of Residential Education.

Student-Election Campaigning in Residential Units

Residence hall campaigning is permitted for Vanderbilt Student Government, Honor Council, and Outstanding Senior elections, only (i.e., those with campus-wide or specific residential-unit interest). Room-to-room solicitation or campaigning is specifically prohibited. As a practical matter, campus-wide elections generate more posters than can be accommodated on residential bulletin boards. Students running for office may post two flyers per bulletin board in residences, but may not cover or remove flyers already in place. Posters larger than 11″ x 17″ in size are prohibited. The internal and external use of residential windows, doors, walls, and bathroom stalls is prohibited. Candidates are responsible for removing flyers within 48 hours of the conclusion of an election.

In the lobbies of certain residences, it is appropriate to hang banners of campus-wide interest. In these lobbies, candidates running for campus-wide offices may hang banners limited to three (3) feet in width and five (5) feet in length. Candidates wishing to hang banners in residential lobbies must contact the appropriate Area Coordinator for authorization and guidance. Candidates may reach appropriate Area Coordinator by calling the office of Housing and Residential Education at 615-32(2-2591).

Storage

During the school year, there are limited storage facilities in most residence halls for large luggage items. (Students are expected to keep weekend bags in their rooms.) Storage is available on a “first-come, first-served” basis. Each stored item must be labeled with the student’s name, room number, home address, and date stored, using the storage stickers provided on site. Charges may be assessed for special handling. The University does not accept responsibility for any loss or damage for items students place in storage.

Items may be stored in trunks, metal trashcans or plastic storage containers with lids. Fire regulations require that no cardboard boxes be used for storage of items. Each student may store a maximum of two storage items, but furniture may not be stored in University storage areas.

Summer Storage

Student summer storage facilities are designated for each of the upperclass residential areas. Students may store two items–one of which may be a refrigerator–in the respective residential areas in which they will reside when they return the following fall. Any personal property remaining in living spaces, or in individual floor or corridor closets or storage rooms at the termination of the housing contract, or in the storage rooms past the removal deadlines, will be considered abandoned and may be disposed of without notice at the discretion of the Senior Director of Residential Education. All stored items must be logged in. Students should retain receipts for their records. The University does not accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, stored items.

Substance Free Residences

Residential areas for first-year students are designated as substance free by the office of Housing and Residential Education. The use of tobacco products and the possession or use of alcohol or illicit drugs in these substance-free areas (in either private rooms or common areas) by residents or their guests, is prohibited.

Statutes and University policies regarding the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances apply to all residences.

Wireless Data Network

The University has implemented a wireless data network throughout campus residences. Wireless consumer electronic devices—sometimes called routers, access points (APs) or AirPorts—interfere with the University wireless data network, and, in worst-case circumstances, could even take down the data network. Manufacturers of such devices include Apple, Belkin, D-Link, Linksys, etc. These devices are prohibited. In addition, settings for smartphone hotspots or wireless connectivity for printers and other devices, must be disabled to prevent interference with University wireless APs.

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Chapter 5: Student Engagement

Advisers to Registered Student Organizations / Communications, Student / Freedom of Expression / Funding (See also “Sale, Solicitation, and Fundraising.”) / Governance, Student / Organization Mailboxes, Student / Publicity Promotions and Advertising / Reservations and Event Registration / Sale, Solicitation, and Fundraising / Sound Amplification and Noise /

Contributing to the University’s mission of teaching and learning, student-engagement opportunities help build a community in which students may develop not only as scholars, but also as well-rounded individuals. Engagement in co-curricular endeavors provides a balance of challenge and support designed to enhance students’ intellectual and personal development. Participation aids students in becoming ethical, responsible, and self-disciplined leaders; challenged to develop an appreciation for civility and diversity; prepared for community leadership and citizenship; and supported in an environment that embraces discourse and the exchange of ideas.

Students receive advising in their student-organization roles in areas such as organizational behavior, financial management, ethical decision-making, accountability, and recruitment/retention. Finally, through opportunities to become engaged in the community, students celebrate their own, and each other’s contributions to University life and the larger community.

Advisers to Registered Student Organizations

Registered student organizations are required to have faculty or staff advisers. Assistance may be obtained from the office of Student Organizations concerning financial responsibilities, interpretation of policies and procedures, and methods for obtaining a faculty or administrative adviser.

Advisers are available to counsel and advise officers and members of the organization regarding their responsibilities and to help oversee the activities and finances of the organization. The adviser is expected to be aware of the financial status of the organization to help ensure that the organization remains solvent. Advisers do not have the authority to prohibit the expression of editorial opinion by a campus publication. A more detailed listing of guidelines and requirements may be found on the Student Organizations website.

Communications, Student

Newsletters

Any student organization, supported directly or indirectly by the University, financially or otherwise, wishing to print and distribute a newsletter, must be registered by the office of Student Organizations. Newsletters should inform members of the organization or interested persons about news and activities relevant to that student group, but may not be a journal of opinion.

Vanderbilt Student Publications

Student publications for general distribution to the University community or to persons outside the membership of a student organization and publications funded directly by the student activities fee are under the exclusive authority of VSC.

Vanderbilt Student Communications, Incorporated (VSC), is a nonprofit corporation, affiliated with the University, which publishes and supervises The Vanderbilt Hustler, the campus newspaper; the Commodore yearbook; The Vanderbilt Review, an annual literary/arts magazine; The Torch, a libertarian and conservative publication; The Slant, a humor publication; Orbis, an environmental issues publication; The Vanderbilt Political Review, an academic journal; WRVU, an online radio station; Vandy Radio, an online radio station; VUFinder, a documentary production group; GlobalVU, an international issues journal; Vandy Interactive, a gaming and software development group;The Vanderbilt Historical Review, an academic journal; Synesis; PEARL; RVU Records, a recording studio; and Vanderbilt Television, VTV Channel 6.  

Other Publications

Distribution of publications not produced by Vanderbilt organizations must conform to University policies regulating the use of University facilities.

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Freedom of Expression

As an institution of higher learning dedicated to research, teaching, and service, Vanderbilt is firmly committed to academic freedom and freedom of expression, and will maintain the conditions of freedom of inquiry, thought, and discussion on campus.  The education of Vanderbilt students is guided by the University’s commitment to the principles of open communication, open inquiry, nondiscrimination and civility.  Students are considered as partners in this endeavor and Vanderbilt expects all members of the community to be respectful of each other and to contribute in positive ways to an orderly and civil exchange of diverse ideas and opinions.  Vanderbilt wants all students to feel welcome and safe in an environment dedicated to the critical discussion of complex and challenging ideas.

Information about the sale of printed statements, etc., and the display of posters can be found in the sections “Sale and Solicitation and Fundraising” and “Publicity, Promotion, and Advertising.” Campus organizations sponsoring events involving controversial persons or views are responsible for providing for the safety and well-being of their guests. Arrangements that fulfill this responsibility must be made through the office of Reservations and Events.

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Funding (See also “Sale, Solicitation, and Fundraising.”)

Students enrolled in Vanderbilt University pay a Student Activities Fee. On an annual basis, the Activities Fee Committee of Vanderbilt Student Government (VSG) recommends to the Dean of Students allocations of these fees for registered student organizations that sponsor programs, projects, and services that benefit the students who have paid the fees. Applications for a regular allocation for funding in the subsequent academic year are available—and due—according to the schedule announced annually by the AcFee Committee, In general, programs must demonstrate a wide campus appeal, be available to all students (including graduate and professional students), be free of charge or provided at a reduced rate for students, and must enhance the overall educational, social, or cultural climate available to all students.

Due to the nature of the activities fee’s purpose, only registered student organizations and their respective programs are eligible for activities fee allocations. Further, funds allocated through the AcFee Committee’s recommendation process are subject to some restrictions on their use. More information on student organization eligibility and programming restrictions for activities fee allocations, may be found on the Student Organizations website.

See also “Fees, Co-Curricular” in Chapter 1, “Policies and Regulations.”

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Governance, Student

Graduate & Professional Student

The Graduate School and all of the professional schools and/or programs have representative student organizations that serve as channels for student opinion.

Graduate Student Council of the Graduate School. Membership comprises one elected representative from each department, but any graduate student may participate.

Peabody Graduate Student Association. Membership comprises representatives elected by students in each department. This body coordinates academic, social, and other activities significant to the student community and is also available to the administration and faculty for consultation regarding concerns of the students in Peabody College.

Vanderbilt Bar Association. Membership comprises students of the Law School who are directed by a Board of Governors elected by the classes.

Divinity School Student Government Association. Membership comprises editors of the two student publications and representatives from the various levels of academic training.

Council of Class Officers (School of Medicine). Membership comprises elected officers from each class.

Graduate Nursing Council. Membership comprises representatives of each of the five clinical majors in the M.S.N. program.

Owen School Student Association (OSSA). The Executive Council membership comprises five second-year representatives and four first-year representatives, but all registered candidates for Owen School degrees may participate in OSSA activities. OSSA provides leadership and coordination for professional and social activities.

Undergraduate

The University recognizes a representative student organization that serves as a channel for student opinion for each school. Recognition has been extended by the University, in consultation with the Dean of Students office, to the following governing bodies:

Arts and Science Council. Membership includes the presidents of all registered academic majors’ associations, one first-year student, and one sophomore representative. Students of the College of Arts and Science elect the president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer.

Blair Council. Membership is represented by elected members from the classes and by an elected Executive Committee.

Engineering Council. Membership includes elected representatives from each of the classes, the president, and one elected representative from each registered professional society.

Student Association of Peabody College. The association is directed by an Executive Committee, whose members are elected at large by students of Peabody College. Each class also has a representative on the Executive Committee.

Panhellenic, National Pan-Hellenic, and Interfraternity Councils. The Panhellenic Council, the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), and the Interfraternity Council (IFC), which govern the activities of the Greek social organizations, are composed of representatives from registered national sororities and fraternities on campus.

Vanderbilt Student Government. Vanderbilt Student Government (VSG) represents student interests, concerns, and aspirations, to the faculty and administration. In addition, the organization sponsors and coordinates activities and programming promoting student involvement and interaction with faculty. Student interests are addressed through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the organization. The Senate comprises elected students representing the four undergraduate schools and the residence halls.

In accordance with University policies, the purpose of the Vanderbilt Student Government is as follows:

 

Eligibility

To be eligible for participation in any contest or activity other than a social one, or to act as a representative of Vanderbilt in any public exercise, a student must be a full-time student of the University (as determined by the academic policies of the school in which the student is registered, and published in the University catalog). A student on disciplinary probation may not hold a leadership position, including (but not limited to) Admissions Tour Guide, VUceptor, Resident Adviser, head or business manager of a Vanderbilt Student Communications division, or head or business manager of a registered student organization. Registered student organizations and University departments may have additional eligibility requirements. 

To be eligible to hold office in a student organization or to be a division head or business manager of a Vanderbilt Student Communications division, a student must be enrolled full time (as above), and may not be on academic or disciplinary probation. Also, an undergraduate student must maintain a cumulative 2.0 average. For clarification, see “Nonacademic Undergraduate Class Designation” in Chapter 1, “Policies and Regulations.”

Student organizations or their governing bodies may set eligibility standards that exceed these minimum standards, as long as such eligibility standards comply with the University’s nondiscrimination policy.

Requests for exception or waiver of eligibility regulations should be made through the Dean of Students office with the recommendation of the appropriate governing body.

If a student’s participation in co-curricular endeavors threatens academic performance, the University may counsel the student about the scope of the activities. In addition, restrictions may be placed on a student’s participation in University co-curricular activities for the duration of an accountability sanction.

Registration

The University regulates the campus activities of organizations and groups whose activities relate to the University’s educational and service purposes.

The Student Organizations office registers undergraduate and graduate student organizations within the Vanderbilt community. Sport clubs must have approval from the Director of Campus Recreation or the director’s designee. Religious groups must have approval from the University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life. Political groups must be approved by the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee. Volunteer and/or service organizations must be approved by the Director of Active Citizenship and Service. Greek-letter social organizations requires membership in one of the three Greek-letter governing bodies..

Student organizations must reapply for registration annually. Typically, the deadline for registration is in April for the subsequent academic year. Registration expires July 1 for organizations that fail to re-register, or that are unsuccessful in completing the registration process. All organizations must have a current membership roster and constitution and/or bylaws on file with the Student Organizations office.

The registration process requires the submission of a constitution or bylaws, which include a statement of purpose, criteria for membership, rules of procedure, and, names and contact information for officers and advisers. During the registration process, the organization must affirm that it does not discriminate unlawfully or in violation of University policy. (See “Equal Opportunity” section in Chapter 1 “Policies and Regulations.) Registered student organizations must be open to all students as members and must permit all members in good standing to seek leadership posts. Single-sex organizations are permissible to the extent allowed under Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, 20 U.S.C. § 1681. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to Anita J. Jenious, J.D., Director; the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department; Baker Building; PMB 401809, 2301 Vanderbilt Place; Nashville, TN 37240-1809. Telephone 615-32(2-4705) (V/TDD); FAX 615-34(3-4969.)

Detailed information regarding organization registration may be found on the Student Organizations website.

Organizations must affirm that they will conduct their activities in accordance with all University policies and federal, state, and local laws.

To be eligible for registration, an organization must:

Through established policies and procedures, registered student organizations may seek

Registered student organizations may use the University’s name for purposes generally consistent with the organizations’ purposes and their usual activities or to identify themselves as campus groups (such as the Vanderbilt International Student Association). However, no organization is authorized to make either contractual commitments or binding statements on behalf of the University.

An organization may not use slogans or make statements that purport to speak for the University. For example, statements or slogans such as “Vanderbilt Backs Libertarians” may not be used by organizations unless they have been authorized to speak for the University. Published statements must carry the name of the responsible individual or organization. Unauthorized use or imitation of the official Vanderbilt stationery, logos, or marks, is prohibited.

If a student organization’s budget center has no activity for a period of two fiscal years, funds in that center will be transferred out so that the center balance is zero. Such funds are returned to the Activities Fee pool to be redistributed. 

Fraternities and Sororities

Fraternities and sororities must register annually with the Student Organizations office. The Greek advisers assist with both registration and coordination of their activities. The Greek advisers serve as liaisons between these student groups and the University and between the University and the fraternity and sorority national organizations. For information about policies relating to these groups, visit the Greek Life website. Fraternities and sororities must be members of the Interfraternity, Panhellenic, or National Pan-Hellenic Councils, which have governing responsibilities and accountability authority over their member groups. Corrective actions may be taken for fraternities and sororities by the Interfraternity Council (IFC), the Panhellenic Council, and the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) for violations of fraternity, sorority, or University policies. Violations of University policies may also fall under the jurisdiction of the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity.

Membership

The IFC and Panhellenic Council administer the recruitment programs for their member groups. NPHC organizations each administer its own recruitment program.

The IFC, Panhellenic Council, and NPHC set a minimum academic requirement to join a Greek organization; however, most chapters have higher academic standards. To be eligible for fraternity or sorority membership, students must have carried and passed twelve semester hours. In addition, those seeking membership in Panhellenic or IFC organizations must have achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.5. Those seeking membership in NPHC organizations must meet minimum GPA requirement established by their individual chapters ranging from 2.3-3.0. Advanced Placement credits are not applicable and summer school credits apply only for sophomores and upperclass students.

Establishing Additional Fraternities and Sororities

Proposals for the establishment of additional fraternities and sororities may be made to, or initiated by, members of the Interfraternity, National Pan-Hellenic, or Panhellenic Councils. If approved by the appropriate council, the proposal will be forwarded to the Greek Advisers for consideration. Upon the recommendations of the councils, the Greek Advisers, and the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee, the University may invite a national organization to colonize a new fraternity or sorority.

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Organization Mailboxes, Student

Registered student organizations share a large space in Rand Hall suitable for conducting business and interacting with other registered student organizations. Although accessible to any student, the space is designed for use by registered student organizations. Student organizations are prohibited from establishing offices, social spaces, or living quarters, off-campus.

Registered student organizations desiring University mailboxes may apply to the director of Student Organizations.

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Publicity Promotions and Advertising

Distribution of Notices in Campus Mail Boxes (See “Mail Services,” In Chapter 1, “Policies and Regulations.”), Display of Posters, Banners, and Printed Announcements

Notices that provide information regarding student activities or academic matters, or make announcements pertinent to the business of the University may be posted on campus. Commercial advertising matter and posters unrelated to the University are prohibited since advertising opportunity is provided in campus publications. Individuals who advertise services to students (e.g., typing or sale of books) may post small notices on bulletin boards.

Notices must carry the name of the responsible campus organization or department.

Notices, posters, flyers, banners, etc., may not use logos or trademarks of alcoholic beverages, or mention or refer to alcoholic beverages or their availability at an event. “B.Y.O.B.,” as shorthand for “Bring Your Own Beverage,” may be used on postings, etc., for events that have been registered B.Y.O.B. during the event registration process.

Nails, tacks, tape, or staples may not be used to attach posters to trees or buildings, but posters and banners may be tied to tree trunks with string.

Stakes bearing signs may not be driven into the ground. From time to time, University departments may install directional signs similar in design to those signs placed in yards for political campaigns. Student organizations desiring to use such signs must obtain authorization from the Director of Student Organizations, or the director’s designee. Note that the use of such signs is reserved for directions, only, that they may not be used for general advertising or promotion, and that they must be removed immediately at the conclusion of the event for which they are installed.

Posters and fliers may be posted by registered student organizations on the bulletin boards at The Commons Center, Sarratt Student Center | Rand Hall, The Kissam Center, and The Student Life Center with the authorization of building management, obtained at the reception desks of these facilities.

The kiosk at Stevenson Center may be used for poster display. Bulletin boards in classroom buildings, however, are reserved for announcements concerning academic programs. Notices may be attached to kiosks or bulletin boards with thumbtacks, but they may not be stapled or taped anywhere. Notices may not be posted on automobiles.

Registered student organizations may place posters that measure no more than 24” x 36” on the posting boards attached to the exterior walls of Rand Hall. Each organization is limited a single poster or flyer, regardless of size, on each board.

Permission to display banners in any residence must be obtained from the appropriate Area Coordinator for Housing and Residential Education. Permission to hang posters in the dining spaces of Rand Hall must be obtained from the Director of Vanderbilt Campus Dining. Permission to display banners in The Commons Center, Sarratt Student Center| Rand Hall, the Kissam Center, and the Student Life Center must be obtained from building management at the reception desks of these facilities, and is issued only rarely, if at all.

Student organization use of the banner display devices on the east side of Sarratt Student Center | Rand Hall requires no prior authorization. However banners must comply with the requirements for notices, above.

Greek chapters with houses may hang banners from their own facilities. Student organizations seeking to hang banners from Greek houses must secure the authorization of the chapter.

The University may remove posters, banners, or other advertising that remain three days after the date of an event, and may charge the person or organization responsible for them. Organizations will be held financially responsible for enforcing these policies with candidates for their respective offices. If an organization continually violates these policies, it may lose the privilege of posting notices or have its registration withdrawn.

Hand-Painted Signs and Banners

Hand-painted signs and banners should be made with acrylic latex house paint, which can be cleaned up with water. This paint will not dissolve in water or run, once dry. If a poster or banner stains the surface to which it is attached, the responsible student or organization will be charged for the stain removal. Space for making hand-painted signs and banners is available on the third floor of Rand Hall.

Banners may not be hung from trees, or between trees, or from or between other objects such as lampposts. With the endorsement and cooperation of student government, a series of poles with rigging especially designed for the hanging of banners has been installed on the east side of Rand Hall, to consolidate the display of banners.

Permission to paint designated windows in the dining or housing areas must be obtained from the Director of Vanderbilt Campus Dining or the Director of Housing Facilities, respectively.

Chalk, “Tagging,” etc.

The use of chalk on any surface other than a chalkboard is prohibited, and the use of chalkboards in classrooms is limited to instructional or meeting purposes.

Using markers, paint, or any other medium on any surface other than banners, posters, or flyers, is prohibited, as is using self-adhesive labels or stickers on surfaces other than banners, posters, or flyers. Individuals and organizations may be charged for repair or cleaning of damaged surfaces.

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Reservations and Event Registration

Reservation Policies

Student organizations are required to register all co-curricular programs and special events (meetings, concerts, lectures, etc.) Reservations and Events, room 189 Sarratt Student Center 615-32(2-2448).

Registered student organizations, administrative offices, or academic departments may reserve space on campus.

Using space on campus without reservation, other than for informal study, is prohibited.

The Reservations and Events website provides a more detailed list of reservation policies, and a link to the online reservations tool. Reservations can also be made by visiting or calling Reservations and Events (room 189 Sarratt Student Center, 615-32(2-2448)), which will resolve scheduling conflicts.

Special Event Registration

The special event registration process is designed to support a variety of events that have special needs. The Special Event Registration Committee comprises representatives from Reservations and Events, Traffic and Parking, Vanderbilt University Police Department, Plant Operations, the Center for Student Wellbeing, and the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee, and staff who oversee compliance with the protection of minors policy.

The special event registration process is managed online in Anchor Link. Occasionally, event organizers may be required to meet with the committee should clarification be needed on one or more arrangements for the event.

The following types of events must be registered through the Special Event Registration Process in Anchor Link:

Registering a special event requires completion of the following steps:

Requests for Exceptions

The responsibility for compliance with the foregoing regulations for events lies with the sponsoring organization. Requests for exceptions should be made at the time of registration through the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee.

Student Domestic, Co-Curricular Travel

Vanderbilt registers and assumes responsibility only for those official overnight or out-of-town trips sponsored and directed by an administrative division of the University (e.g., the Spirit of Gold Marching Band). The University assumes no responsibility for travel for which the University has no oversight, such as sorority and fraternity destination formals, or affiliated ministry service trips. However, such organizations and ministries undertaking such travel must–in advance of the trip–inform their advisers (the Greek advisers in the case of fraternities and sororities), and provide emergency contact information and a roster of student travelers to the Vanderbilt University Police Department and the office of Housing and Residential Education.

Any student who wishes to travel on behalf of, or as a representative of, Vanderbilt University or any registered student organization must receive written authorization in advance from the appropriate dean. (See also the section entitled “Universal Waiver,” in Chapter 1, “Policies and Regulations.”)

Provisions of the Student International Travel policy apply to students traveling abroad in University programs, including those of a co-curricular nature, or on University business.

Domestic student travel for academic programs is overseen by academic departments and schools. Travel for students participating in varsity athletic events is overseen by the athletics administration. Travel for students participating in Outdoor Recreation programs or Sports Clubs is overseen by the Vanderbilt Recreation and Wellness Center.

Students traveling domestically for other co-curricular engagement must comply with the policies and procedures set forth, below. Travel proposals and plans are subject to review by the Dean of Students and/or the Dean’s designee.

Generally, students traveling for co-curricular programs are required to complete Student Travel Forms [60-002-658 (9/11)], and the accompanying Release of Liability form, although there are some exceptions.

Students engaged in co-curricular travel in Davidson or one of the contiguous counties may be excused from completing the form in circumstances where the travel is incidental (e.g., picking up materials from local merchants, or running other errands), or may be required to complete the form only once for recurring activity.

Even in these cases, completion of the Student Travel Forms is required if one or more of the following conditions is relevant:

  1. Disaster zones
  2. High crime areas
  3. Programs and experiences addressing populations under stress (the homeless, the incarcerated, or the medically at risk)
  4. Protest sites and demonstrations
  5. Remote areas (more than 60 miles from the nearest hospital)

Students using their own vehicles for sanctioned co-curricular travel must have a valid driver’s license, and must complete the University’s driver training. Students using their own vehicles must be insured, and must understand that they themselves are the “primary insurers,” in the event of accidents. A “primary insurer” responds first to any auto insurance claim. Secondary insurers respond only after the primary insurance is exhausted.

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Sale, Solicitation, and Fundraising

These regulations apply to the sale or distribution of goods and services and the solicitation for, promotion of, and advertising of any item, program, charity, or service.

The following guidelines generally apply:

Co-Sponsorships

Student organizations should prepare their budgets to meet their annual needs, and participate in the annual Activity Fee allocation process. However, there may be times when new organizations form after the process has been concluded, when a new initiative arises, or when an unanticipated opportunity presents itself. Registered student organizations seeking co-sponsorships for programs or events have several options.

The AcFee Contingency Fund provides limited support for new organizations that were not eligible to participate in the annual activity fee allocation process, and for established organizations with new initiatives or unexpected circumstances. The application form is available in the Forms section on the Vanderbilt Student Government Anchor Link page.

Vanderbilt Student Government also administers co-sponsorship funding, the application for which may also be found in the Forms section of the VSG Anchor Link page. VSG allocates for both general co-sponsorship grants and a “co-sponsorship of the month.”

The Vanderbilt Programming Board administers co-sponsorship funding for program initiatives that align with the missions of the VPB component organizations. The application can be found in the Forms section of the VPB Anchor Link page.

The Dean of Students office has no central funding for co-sponsorships, but a number of its component departments do maintain limited co-sponsorship budgets. To apply for co-sponsorship funds, student organization leaders may apply for co-sponsorship funds by completing the application in the “Forms” section of the Dean of Students Anchor Link page.

Please note that student organizations may not approach offices outside the scope of the Dean of Students, more than one department within the Dean of Students operation, academic departments, or other programs, services, and centers across the University, for financial co-sponsorships. Students who believe that a particular department or office might be interested in its program initiative, or who wish to inquire whether a particular academic department routinely supports a particular organization, should consult either their own advisers within the Dean of Students offices, or (if their advisers work elsewhere), the Student Organizations office.

Dues, Ticket Sales, and On-campus Fundraisers

Registered student organizations are entitled to charge dues to their membership. Dues must be deposited in an organization’s University account upon receipt. Registered groups may also charge admission to events, provided that the primary purpose of sales is to raise money for the benefit of the organization, or for the benefit of a charitable group, and not for the benefit of individual members of the organization. In accordance with Tennessee state law, students may not sell tickets for a raffle or lottery. Drawings for door prizes awarded to ticket-holding participants at an event are permitted.

No approval is required for the sale of tickets for admission, or for the distribution of items for suggested donation for fund raising when raised funds are solely for the organization or its charity and are deposited into the organization’s University account. Students must make arrangements with Reservations and Events in Sarratt Student Center to reserve a table or room to sell tickets or distribute items.

Students must secure the approval of the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee in order to sell or deliver items door-to-door in campus residences.

Organizations wishing to sell event tickets using the Commodore Card must make arrangements with the Sarratt Box Office for Ticketmaster setup, and must comply with the requirements for such sales. Ticketmaster may be used for ticket sales, only. There is no option for sale of items or collecting donations on the card.

Some registered student organizations might choose to undertake auctions or silent auctions as an element of a fundraising event. In so doing, the sponsoring organization must ensure compliance with applicable statutes and University policy. Tobacco, alcohol, or promotional items for these products may not be used for auctions or any other fundraising activity. The Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee may prohibit other items at the Dean or designee’s discretion. Such items might include animals, gift cards or other items from adult entertainment establishments, etc.

Distribution of items for a suggested donation and other promotional activities must be conducted by members of the registered student organization. No organization may sponsor the sale of goods or services to students on behalf of a non-Vanderbilt commercial enterprise, except where the sales activity provides a value-added service during a traditional Vanderbilt event, such as orientation, Homecoming, or Rites of Spring. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee.

For information regarding other on-campus sources of funding, consult the Student Organizations website.

Service Auctions

The auction of services to other students, to faculty, staff, and other members of the Vanderbilt community is permitted within the following limitations:

Only specific services may be offered (e.g., a car wash, the preparation of a meal). The offering of unspecified labor—for either a specific period of time, or an open-ended period–is prohibited.

Offering services that require a license (haircuts, manicures, massages, etc.), is prohibited, as is the offering of services that are in violation of the law or University policy, and services that potentially endanger the health, safety, or well-being of students or others.

The “auction” of individuals is prohibited, as is the auction of unspecified services of individuals.

Advertising and promotional materials for service sales and auctions must list the services on offer.

Advertising and promotional materials must provide the name of the organization(s) receiving the funds raised.

The Dean of Students reserves the option of denying approval of, or canceling, events whose arrangements fail to comply with the delineated limitations or which seek to circumvent their purpose.

Off-Campus Fundraising

If an organization has exhausted sources of funding on campus, it may be possible to solicit funds from sources off campus. Funds can be obtained in several ways: through solicitation of parents and alumni, solicitation of area merchants and large corporations, and invitations for co-sponsorship or gifts in kind from businesses.

Guidelines for Soliciting Parents and Alumni

The Office of Annual Giving holds access to limited historical records of registered student organization membership, and may be able to provide a registered student organization with mailing data of the organization's alumni. To obtain the mailing data (usually provided as a set of labels), a group may submit a request to the Student Organizations office to determine if there is a list of its organization's alumni. If such a list exists, the registered student organization must complete the Fundraiser/Solicitation Form in Anchor Link for review by the Student Organizations office and the Office of Annual Giving. If approved, the mailing data will be provided. The Office of Annual Giving requires two week’s notice to process requests, so student organizations should submit requests to the Student Organizations office at least four weeks in advance.

Provided mail and email lists are made available by the Office of Annual Giving for one-time use, only. Once the fundraising project is complete, or a list has been held for more than thirty days, the list is out of date and must be discarded. If after thirty days the project has not been completed, a new list must be requested. By statute, the University is required to update alumni, parent, and friend communications preferences (such as mail or email subscription drops), continually. Using an out-of-date list subjects the University to the risk of potential violation of statutes such as the CAN-SPAM Act.

Registered student organizations may obtain authorization to solicit funds from the parents of its membership by submitting the Fundraiser/Solicitation Form in Anchor Link. The proposal must include a statement of the purpose of the appeal, a sample of the solicitation mailing, and the proposed date of the appeal. The Student Organizations office will forward the proposal to the Office of Annual Giving for review.

Guidelines for Solicitation of Area Merchants and Corporate Sponsors

Area merchants and corporations can contribute to registered student organization endeavors in two ways: by a simple donation of money, items, or merchandise, or by a donation of money, items or merchandise in return for some recognition, an arrangement sometimes known as co-sponsorship.

1. An organization that plans to solicit an area merchant or corporation for a simple donation or gift must complete the Fundraiser/Solicitation Form in Anchor Link for review by the Student Organizations office and the Office of Gift Processing. If authorization is granted, the organization is limited to soliciting those merchants whose names appear on a list provided by the Office of Annual Giving, and must instruct donors to send contributions to the Office of Gift Processing.

2. Generally, student groups may acknowledge the assistance or contribution of co-sponsoring merchants or corporations in programs, banners, displays, or event memorabilia (party favors, T-shirts, caps, etc.), and the event website. Sponsorship is the passive listing of the name or logo of a sponsor tastefully displayed on a T-shirt, banner, or event website, or listed among sponsors in a program. (It is not intended to solicit business. It simply acknowledges the support for the team, the event, etc. The Dean of Students office does not endorse advertisements for off-campus businesses, such advertisements being those that are designed to bring more business to the off-campus concern.) Student groups may not permit co-sponsoring merchants or corporations to conduct sales or sales promotion, or distribute free samples in conjunction with any student organization program or event, unless the sales promotion activity provides a value-added service during a traditional Vanderbilt event, such as orientation, Homecoming, or Rites of Spring. Exceptions to this policy must be approved in advance by the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee. Co-sponsorships by alcoholic beverage or tobacco brands or distributors, or “limited service restaurants” (bars) as defined by Tennessee statute TCA 57-4-102, are prohibited.

As is the case with student organization and departmental co-sponsors, groups are strongly advised to develop a written co-sponsorship agreement with external co-sponsors. Written agreements should list time and date of program, the agreed-upon responsibilities of all co-sponsoring parties, and the required signatures of all co-sponsoring parties. Sample agreements can be obtained from the Student Organizations officeonce co-sponsorship plans are approved. The sponsoring organization must instruct co-sponsoring agencies to send contributions to Gift Processing.

Grants and Foundations

Many private and corporate foundations and federal agencies have funds or grants available for organizations seeking funding for educational or service programs. Grant writing requires a great deal of research, but can yield positive results. The Office of Sponsored Research 615-32(2-2631) is a good resource for additional information.

Soliciting for Charity

Registered student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, may solicit the student body for charitable purposes. The following guidelines apply:

Students should be aware that although policy does not prohibit them from sending charitable solicitations to faculty and staff, persons on the University payroll may run afoul of University policy should they forward those solicitations to their colleagues.

Violations of these policies will subject the organization and the officers of the organization to corrective action by the office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity and the student governing bodies with jurisdiction. The organization may also lose its registration

Requests for exceptions to these guidelines should be made in writing to the Office of the Dean of Students at least two weeks before the solicitation.

The Student Organizations office has responsibility for effecting compliance with these policies and prescribing the conduct of those who participate in charitable solicitation. It is the responsibility of the individual student or organization doing the solicitation to comply with these policies and the prescribed conduct. Student organizations soliciting for charitable purposes will be required to comply with state and local laws regulating charitable solicitations.

Vanderbilt University Charitable Giving Policy

As a not-for-profit educational institution, Vanderbilt University seeks and receives the support of the community through its delivery of health care, its athletic programs, its participation in the commercial real estate market, and its status as a corporate citizen, as well as in other ways.

Nashville has a strong tradition of charitable fundraising and a tradition of generous participation in charitable dinners by the corporate community. Although Vanderbilt University raises funds in the Nashville community for its own academic and research programs, it actively participates in this tradition both through in-kind contributions to community services, particularly in those areas that are related to Vanderbilt’s mission, such as education, and on occasion, through financial contributions to fundraising events.

Charitable donations in lieu of sending flowers in memory of the bereaved may be made by the University if the donation does not exceed fifty dollars ($50.00).

All contributions will be made in the name of Vanderbilt University and Medical Center.

Soliciting for Religious Activities

The University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life coordinates religious activities. Student religious groups, after being registered by the Student Organizations office, will be assisted by the Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life in fulfilling their aims insofar as these are consistent with other University policies.

Campus religious groups must be registered, and registered religious groups must have faculty advisers. Representatives of off-campus organizations may be invited onto the campus for specific purposes, but these representatives may not interfere with the self-determination of campus groups. Representatives of religious organizations may visit rooms in campus residences only with the prior invitation of the resident students of those rooms.

Off-campus representatives of religious organizations may meet with groups on campus and assist them in fulfilling their aims (when these are consistent with procedures established in this section of the Student Handbook), only after securing the written authorization of the University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life. This authorization may include a letter of introduction to the University provided by the University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life and will specify procedures to be followed. The University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life will assist in providing meeting places.

Solicitation for religious purposes by on- or off-campus groups or individuals is governed by the same regulations stated in the sections “Publicity, Promotion and Advertising” and “Student Organization Fundraising.” Specifically, persons are strongly discouraged from approaching individuals whom they do not know in order to recruit them for religious reasons. Note that employees may not engage in religious solicitation in their job settings. Visits to residences by individuals from off campus are to be at the invitation of a particular student, for a particular time, in that student’s room, only, and with the permission of that student’s roommates, if any. For example, persons who are invited to visit in a resident’s room may not recruit on the hall among other students. This policy also prohibits the use of any common spaces in dormitories or campus buildings for recruitment, training, prayer groups, or any other activities unless the group is a registered student organization.

Vanderbilt does not infringe on any individual’s religious freedom. Indeed, the University encourages the free flow of religious ideas as well as lively debate among persons from various religious persuasions. However, Vanderbilt will endeavor to protect students and others in the University community from unauthorized solicitation.

For further information concerning religious solicitation, students may consult the Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life.

Soliciting for Employment

Students may note that employment representatives (including current students who may be employed with an organization) who wish to recruit students for any type of job must register with the Vanderbilt Center for Student Professional Development, 220 Student Life Center, 615-32(2-2750). Arrangements must be cleared in advance and specific procedures must be followed.

Organizations recruiting anywhere on campus must obtain permission from the Center. Recruiting includes the posting of bulletin board notices for jobs, hosting employment-related meetings, or distributing materials on campus. All approved notices must clearly state the organization, product or service involved, and a job description. Notices may not be posted on automobiles, distributed in campus residences, or posted on any other unauthorized space on campus.

Employers who wish to post positions electronically for internships or full-time permanent employment should forward notices to the Center by email at recruiting@vanderbilt.edu. To post part-time jobs or student employment jobs electronically, employers should call Student Employment in the Financial Aid Office at 615-32(2-3591) or visit the website. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in the prohibition of future recruiting activities by the offending organization.

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Sound Amplification and Noise

Functions or special events which require electronic sound amplification (for musical instruments, stereos, vocal performances, or public address) must be registered with the Special Events Registration Committee and approved by the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee. Electronic amplification may not be used in the vicinity of classroom buildings, the library, or the hospital. Use of outside amplification at any event or function held in close proximity to campus residences must involve consultation with Housing and Residential Education.

Sound amplifiers may not be positioned without authorization in such a way as to provide outside amplification (e.g., inside buildings or on porches).

Due to the capacity of certain automotive speaker systems to disturb the quiet of the campus, use of these systems at sufficient volume to be heard outside of the vehicle is prohibited.

Authorization for late evening concerts or events to be held outside and where campus-wide attendance is expected may be granted for Friday and Saturday nights, with the hours set at the discretion of the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee. Individual groups having parties primarily for the benefit of the group may be granted authorization for afternoon or twilight concerts or events, as appropriate. Outdoor amplification equipment may be used with activities such as late afternoon or early evening pep rallies, speak-out programs on Rand Terrace, twilight concerts, and carnivals, etc., so long as they do not interfere with scheduled academic or administrative activities.

Moderate sound amplification for informal listening on decks and patios of Greek chapter houses and campus residences is permitted from 4pm to 8pm on Fridays, and noon to 8pm on Saturdays. The Dean of Students or the dean’s designee may issue additional guidelines for activities routinely permitted without specific authorization, such as weekend music playing on Greek row. These guidelines may be revised upon the recommendation of the Interfraternity, National Pan-Hellenic, or Panhellenic Councils, or other student representative groups, or upon the initiation of the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee.

Sound amplification-whether specifically authorized or informal, inside or outside-may be monitored by University officials, student representative groups, or IFC or Panhellenic representatives. Monitoring may include on-site inspections and the use of a decibel meter.

Local laws prohibit the use of amplification outdoors between the hours of 11pm and 7am if a facility is within fifty feet of a residence except when exempted for a special event or gathering and if a permit is issued by the Metropolitan Nashville Government. At all times, consideration should be given to the neighboring communities as stated in the “Good Neighbor Guidelines.”

Amplification which violates University policy or local ordinances may be discontinued at the discretion of the Dean of Students or the dean’s designee, or a representative of the Dean of Students (including officers with the University Police Department, or directors in Housing and Residential Education).

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Chapter 6: Alcohol and Controlled Substances

Alcoholic Beverage and Controlled Substances Policies / Harm Reduction – BASICS / Event Policies for Graduate and Professional Students and Organizations / Event Policies for Undergraduate Students and Organizations / Sanctions / Resources / Health Risks / Warning Signs of Possible Substance Abuse /

Vanderbilt University is deeply concerned about the health and welfare of its students. University policies and regulations in general–and alcohol and controlled substances policies in particular–reflect that concern. The purpose of University policies, and the purpose of articulating them in great detail, is to enable students to make informed–and, it is hoped, intelligent–choices, as well as to enable them to understand the consequences of making unhealthy choices. In compliance with the federal Drug-Free Schools and Campuses regulations, Vanderbilt has adopted a policy that includes the expectation that students will comply with federal, state, and local laws, including those relating to alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and other drugs.

The University prohibits the unlawful possession, use, distribution, or facilitation of the distribution of alcohol and controlled substances by students, faculty, and staff, on its property, or as part of any University-sponsored activity. The prohibition extends to off-campus activities that are officially sponsored by Vanderbilt, its schools, departments, or organizations. In addition, the prohibition extends to off-campus professional or organizational activities, including attendance at conferences, when participation is sponsored by the University, or when the participating student, faculty member, or staff member is representing the University. Finally, the prohibition extends to “private” events off campus where the University may have an interest (e.g., if a student were to provide alcohol to underage students at an off-campus location).

In addition, the improper use of prescription drugs is a serious problem on college campuses. For this reason, it is a violation of University policy for a student to be in possession of, or use, another person’s prescription medication or for a student to distribute medications to one person that have been prescribed for another. Note that in addition to being violations of University policy, these practices are also felonies under federal statutes. 

To underscore the seriousness with which it takes the issue of health and welfare of its constituent populations, the University will impose sanctions on students, faculty, and staff–up to and including expulsion or termination of employment, and possible referral for prosecution–for violation of the alcohol and controlled substances policy. Conditions of continued employment or enrollment may include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program and/or active participation in a recovery program.

In addition to the standards of conduct prohibited by law and University policy, students, faculty, and staff are subject to the additional requirements, standards, and procedures promulgated by their respective schools, departments, and organizations. Additional standards of conduct, standards, and procedures may be found elsewhere in The Student Handbook, in the Faculty Manual, and in the Medical Center Alcohol and Drug Use Policy (Policy No. 30-im08), in the Human Resources policy, and any applicable union contract. Students, faculty, and staff may refer to these documents for details.

Alcoholic Beverage and Controlled Substances Policies

For Students

The following regulations apply to the possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances by individual students and their guests, on or off campus:

For Organizations

All of the regulations outlined above apply to organizations. In addition, the following regulations also apply to the possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages or controlled substances by groups, by University departments, or by an organization’s members and invited guests, on or off campus:

Immunity for Seeking Emergency Treatment

It is in the best interest of students’ welfare that persons who overdose or become intoxicated be brought to the attention of medical personnel. For that reason, it is University policy that a student seeking medical attention for intoxication or overdose will be eligible for immunity for the use or underage possession of alcohol or other drugs and the resulting overdose or intoxication, provided that the sole reason the student’s intoxication or overdose was discovered by University officials was through the seeking of medical care (by the affected student or by others).

Immunity for alcohol violations extends to individuals seeking help for the intoxicated student. Students granted immunity will be required to complete a course of evaluation, counseling and, where indicated, treatment. Failure to complete the prescribed course and/or treatment can result in the revocation of immunity.

Seeking emergency treatment for one who has overdosed or become intoxicated does not relieve a group or organization of responsibility for a violation of policy, such as providing alcohol to an underage person resulting in the intoxication for which emergency treatment is sought. However, the fact that an organization sought help for an intoxicated student will be considered favorably in determining any sanction for policy violations.

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Harm Reduction – BASICS

Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) is a process administered by the Center for Student Wellbeing for providing helpful information to students about their use of alcohol and other drugs.  Following a “harm-reduction” approach, the program seeks to motivate students to reduce the risk of adverse consequences from use of alcohol and other drugs.

If there is substantial risk of further substance-related or mental health concerns, a referral is made to the Psychological and Counseling Center.

The campus resource for students or campus professionals who want to learn more about talking to students about alcohol and other drugs is the Center for Student Wellbeing 615-32(2-0480).

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Event Policies for Graduate and Professional Students and Organizations

Graduate and professional students and organizations must register their events with the office of the relevant school’s dean and in Anchor Link. Once the dean’s office approval has been secured, the event must also be registered with the Registration and Events office, and, if alcoholic beverages are to be present, authorized by the Special Events Registration Committee. The stipulations of event management below may be superseded by additional requirements of facilities management when an event occurs at a location other than the relevant school.

If an undergraduate student organization cosponsors an event with a graduate or professional student organization, or if undergraduates are invited or present at an event, the policies governing undergraduate events must be followed. In addition, graduate or professional student organizations and their officers are subject to corrective action through the University’s student accountability process if there are violations of the underage drinking law or University policies and regulations at their events.

Event Management

  1. On an annual basis, complete “Host Responsibility Training,” provided by the Center for student Wellbeing, at least three weeks prior to the first event of the year 615-32(2-0480).
  2. Designate a primary host and at least one secondary host for every event. Hosts are responsible for implementing and enforcing all event management policies. Additional secondary hosts should be designated depending on the size and scope of the event.
  3. Provide alternative beverages and food during the entire period that alcoholic beverages are available. Students organizing the event are responsible for providing both nonalcoholic beverages and food.
  4. Provide some form of security at all events at which alcohol will be consumed. Security arrangements for an event must be reviewed and approved by the Special Events Registration Committee, where applicable, in advance of the event.  Student hosts may serve as security depending on the size and scope of the event.
  5. Register any on campus event as one of the following:
    • An event at which alcohol will be present on a “bring-your-own” or B.Y.O.B. basis. The beverages at B.Y.O.B. events hosted by graduate or professional student organizations are limited to beer and wine; students and guests are prohibited from bringing liquor. The recommended quantity of authorized beverage is not more than three (3) standard drink units (which is twelve [12] ounces for beer and five [5] ounces for wine), with a maximum limit of six (6) standard drink units.Glass bottles are prohibited except at those registered events where attendees are required to check their alcoholic beverages with a third-party licensed bartender responsible for distribution throughout the event. On such occasions, the beverage must be transferred to a non-breakable paper or plastic cup for consumption.
    • An event at which alcohol will be provided by the graduate or professional organization and served by student hosts. The beverages at these events hosted by graduate and professional student organizations are limited to beer and wine; liquor is prohibited. The recommended quantity of authorized beverage is not more than three (3) standard drink units (which is twelve [12] ounces for beer and five [5] ounces for wine), with a maximum limit of six (6) standard drink units. Organizers must ensure that any student who will host or serve alcoholic beverages has successfully completed “Host Responsibility Training” prior to the event. Hosts and servers must not have consumed alcohol or other drugs prior to or during the event or their shift as a server. The practice of “self-serve” is prohibited.
    • An event at which liquor will be present. Liquor may only be present and served at an event hosted by graduate or professional student organizations when a third-party licensed bartender is engaged to distribute all alcohol. The expectation is that the quantity of provided beverage will be three (3) standard drink units, which is 1.5 ounces of eighty (80) proof liquor.
  6. Check identification at all events where alcohol is present, either through security, student hosts, or third-party licensed bartenders.
  7. Keep alcohol in a regulated or secured space or area during all events where it is present, except at on campus events designated as B.Y.O.B. during which attendees must keep their alcohol with them at all times.
  8. Display appropriate signage to indicate rules and restrictions that will be in place depending on the nature of the event. For example, signage stating, “No Alcohol Beyond This Point” should be used for events that are not designated as B.Y.O.B. All events where alcohol is present should have signage reminding attendees that identification will be checked and only attendees over 21 years of age are permitted to consume alcohol.
  9. For off-campus events, engage third-party (and, where applicable, licensed) vendors for all services (i.e., security, identification checks, distribution of alcohol, etc.).
  10. Comply with the appropriate dean’s office standards that effect the engaging of security officers or third-party bartenders (e.g., an event with a band or DJ, or guests invited from outside the Vanderbilt community, might require security, but it is unlikely that a wine and cheese reception for a visiting scholar would).

 

Events that Include Sales of Alcohol

  1. Arrangements must be made for a third-party vendor to sell alcohol.
  2. Staff of the student centers will assist student organizers of events in obtaining third-party vendors.
  3. The arrangements with the vendor must be reviewed by the Special Events Registration Committee and approved by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee. Only the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee may sign a contract with a vendor for the sale of alcohol.
  4. Student organizations or other event sponsors are prohibited from obtaining alcohol for resale by the vendor.
  5. Student organizations or other event sponsors are prohibited from receiving proceeds from the sale of alcohol.

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Event Policies for Undergraduate Students and Organizations

For special events, a space may be designated as a place where the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages by those of legal drinking age is permitted. However, such occasions must be registered, approved, and advertised five days in advance as an event at which alcohol may be consumed. Sponsoring organizations may arrange for the provision in two ways.

  1. They may register the event as “B.Y.O.B” (“bring your own beverage”).
  2. With the authorization of the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee, they may arrange for licensed vendors to sell distilled spirits and wine. (Beer is generally excluded because statutes prohibit the sale of beer within certain distances of buildings whose purpose is considered educational in nature.)

Event Management

  1. Events (on campus or off) at which alcohol will be available must be registered and arrangements approved by the Special Events Registration Committee at least four weeks in advance of the event. Fundraising events—or “bar nights”—in “limited service restaurants” (bars)—as defined by Tennessee statute TCA 54-4-102—or at any location where money is collected at the door, or through any other arrangement, with an establishment involving financial transactions that circumvent the University’s accounting system, are prohibited. In addition, co-sponsorships of any sort with—or from—a business or establishment with alcohol sales accounting for more than 50 percent of total business transactions (“bar” as defined by Tennessee statute TCA 57-4-102) are prohibited.
  2. On an annual basis, organizers of events at which alcohol will be available must attend Host Responsibility Training, provided by the Center for Student Wellbeing, at least three weeks prior to its first event of the year 615-32(2-0480).
  3. Fraternity and sorority events must be registered with the Greek Life office, and must comply with the alcohol policies of the pertinent Greek governing body as well as the University.
  4. Events of religious organizations or affiliated ministries, which employ exceptions to state law regarding the age requirement for consumption of alcohol, must be registered with the Dean of Students office. Such events must comply with all event management policies, except to the extent that compliance conflicts with an excepted religious practice.
  5. Security must be provided at all events at which alcohol will be consumed. Security arrangements for an event must be reviewed and approved by the Special Events Registration Committee in advance of the event.
  6. Undergraduate organizations, groups, individuals, students, faculty, and staff may not serve alcoholic beverages to undergraduate students, except by special authorization from the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee.
  7. The sale of alcoholic beverages is prohibited with the exception of occasions for which the Special Events Registration Committee has approved the engagement of a licensed vendor. This prohibition includes the sale of tickets that can be traded for alcoholic beverages, or the sale of tickets or t-shirts required for entry into an event where alcohol is distributed, or any scheme masking the distribution of alcohol. (See “Events that Include the Sale of Alcohol.”)
  8. Any time alcoholic beverages are served or permitted, alternative beverages and food must also be provided during the entire period that alcoholic beverages are available. Students organizing the event are responsible for providing nonalcoholic beverages and food.
  9. Individuals who wish to invite guests to a gathering in their apartments, suites, or lodges must have authorization from the Area Coordinator for the residential area, or the AC’s designee. The authorization forms for these events may be found on the respective Anchor Link pages of the residences in which such gatherings are permitted: Carmichael Towers East suites, Carmichael Towers West, Chaffin Place, Lewis House, Moore College, Morgan House,  Mayfield Apartments, and Warren College. For the event to be authorized, a majority of the hosts must be of legal age to drink alcoholic beverages. (See “Party Registration” in Chapter 4, “Residential Life.”) Failure to comply with all stated event management policies for such gatherings may result in corrective action for participants
  10. In keeping with the University’s policy prohibiting student organizations from making contractual commitments (whether formal, understood, or implied), student organizations may not hold events at off-campus locations without the express approval of the appropriate adviser and the completion of appropriate contractual documents approved by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee. A number of registered student organizations with oversight from their national organizations have secured exceptions from the Dean of Students to this approval process.

B.Y.O.B. Events

  1. Undergraduate students who have reached the legal drinking age in the state of Tennessee (21 years old) may possess and consume alcoholic beverages at events registered and approved for consumption on a “bring-your-own” basis. B.Y.O.B. practices contemplate that an individual student of drinking age may share alcoholic beverages with a date or a companion who is also of legal drinking age. However, any subterfuge or device to evade the spirit of the University policy prohibiting the use of common containers by undergraduates or the provision of alcoholic beverages at undergraduate functions, will subject both students and organizations to corrective action.
  2. Policies of the student centers prohibit B.Y.O.B. events. (See “Events that Include Sales of Alcohol” for alternative arrangements.)
  3. The beverage at B.Y.O.B. events hosted by registered student organizations is limited to “beer,” only, as defined by the Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 57, Chapter 5 (i.e., those alcoholic beverages that can be found in convenience and grocery stores); students and guests are prohibited from bringing liquor, wine, and other alcoholic beverages to such events. The recommended quantity of authorized beverage is not more than three (3) standard drink units (which is twelve [12] ounces for beer), with a maximum limit of six (6) standard drink units.Glass bottles are prohibited except at those registered events where attendees are required to check their alcoholic beverages with a third-party bartender responsible for distribution throughout the event. On such occasions, the beverage must be transferred to a non-breakable paper or plastic cup for consumption.
  4. Identification must be checked at all events where alcohol is present, through  third-party security or third-party licensed bartenders. For registered events in residence halls, student hosts may check identification.

Events that Include Sales of Alcohol

  1. Arrangements must be made for a third-party vender to sell alcohol.
  2. Staff of the student centers will assist student organizers of events in obtaining third-party vendors.
  3. The arrangements with the vendor must be reviewed by the Special Events Registration Committee and approved by the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee. Only the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee may sign a contract with a vendor for the sale of alcohol.
  4. Student organizations or other event sponsors are prohibited from obtaining alcohol for resale by the vendor.
  5. Student organizations or other event sponsors are prohibited from receiving proceeds from the sale of alcohol.

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Sanctions

The purpose of any sanction and accompanying accountability action plan for a violation of University policy is to educate and prompt reflection on the part of the student or student organization, effect voluntary compliance with the policy, and ensure the safety and well-being of members of the University community.

Vanderbilt University will impose sanctions on students or student organizations, ranging from an educational conference or deferred probation to disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion, and may also make referral for state or federal prosecution, for violation of its alcohol and controlled substances policy. With the exception of expulsion, sanctions may be accompanied by an accountability action plan. As is the case with violations of other University policies, sanctions imposed will be appropriate to the severity and circumstances of the violation. The student or organization’s previous record, honesty and cooperation, and the seriousness of the offense will be taken into account in the determination of sanction.

University Sanctions for Students

The minimum sanction for simple purchase, possession, or consumption of alcohol in violation of University policy is an educational conference for the first offense. The completion of an appropriate assessment will also be required.

The presumptive sanction for first-offense intoxication is disciplinary probation. Standard indicators of drinking to the level of intoxication may include lack of balance, loss of coordination, confusion, slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, odor of intoxicant, etc.

The minimum sanction for driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs is disciplinary probation and may include loss of campus driving and parking privileges.

Unlawful provision, distribution, or sale of alcohol by a student in violation of University policy will result in serious disciplinary action, which may include suspension or expulsion for the first offense, and may also result in criminal prosecution. The presumptive sanction for a student who illegally distributes alcohol to an underage student will be disciplinary probation for the first offense. Persons who unlawfully furnish alcoholic beverages to students who are not of legal drinking age may also be held responsible for personal injuries or property damages resulting from misconduct committed by underage, intoxicated students.

Distribution or facilitation of distribution of illegal drugs (including unlawful distribution of prescription medication) may result in suspension or expulsion for a first offense; unlawful distribution includes incidents in which no money is exchanged. In addition, the possession of controlled substances or alcohol in such quantities as to create a presumption of possession with the intent to distribute on or off campus is a serious violation that may result in immediate suspension or expulsion. Evidence that a student has distributed drugs is grounds for interim suspension from the University and/or expulsion from University housing pending the findings of accountability proceedings. Students found to have distributed drugs to others may also be held responsible for personal injuries or property damages resulting from misconduct committed by the students under the influence of the distributed substances.

The presumptive sanction for a third violation of alcohol or controlled substances policies is suspension.

Violations involving behavior that injures persons, that damages property, or that injures or damages the community at-large, will increase the presumptive strength of the sanction given.

In addition, sanctions will be imposed for misconduct that results from the use of alcoholic beverages or other drugs. Students will also be held responsible for any damages that result from their misconduct. These sanctions will be imposed consistent with standards and procedures found in Chapter 3, “Student Accountability.”

University Sanctions for Organizations

The minimum sanction for a violation of event registration or management policies by a student organization is an educational conference for the first offense.

The presumptive sanction for student organizations that provide alcohol to those not of legal drinking age, whether through direct purchase or other group activities, is probation, during which time the organization will not be permitted to host or participate in any events, on or off campus, where alcohol is present.

Student organizations that unlawfully furnish alcoholic beverages to students who are not of legal drinking age, may also be held responsible for personal injuries or property damages resulting from misconduct committed by underage, intoxicated students.

In addition, sanctions will be imposed for misconduct that results from the provision or use of alcoholic beverages or other drugs. Student organizations will also be held responsible for any damages that result from their misconduct. These sanctions will be imposed consistent with standards and procedures found in Chapter 3, “Student Accountability.”

Accountability Action Plans

With the exception of expulsion, sanctions may be accompanied by an accountability action plan to help students and organizations understand the potential consequences of policy violations and improve decision-making.

Accountability action plans for violations of alcohol and controlled substances policies can range from assessment to individualized treatment plans, and may include one or more of the following components:

  1. Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), 
  2. Cannabis Use Disorder Identification Test (CUDIT), .
  3. evaluation through BASICS at the Center for Student Wellbeing, or extensive clinical assessment at the Psychological and Counseling Center
  4. participation in an individualized treatment plan at the Psychological and Counseling Center to address substance use and/or co-occurring mental health disorders when indicated by the results of the evaluation,
  5. required attendance at alcohol or other drug education seminars,
  6. implementation of an alcohol or other drug educational program for peers,
  7. work service (such details might include picking up litter from campus lawns, cleaning lobbies, restrooms, and stairwells, of campus residences, etc.),
  8. completion of educational programs or on-line tutorials,
  9. drug testing
  10. research or reflection essays,
  11. restitution, or
  12. letters of apology.

State of Tennessee Sanctions

[This document contains a summary of state and federal sanctions for the unlawful use of controlled substances and alcohol. Portions of the summary were provided by the federal government, and while the summary is a good faith effort to provide information, Vanderbilt does not guarantee its accuracy.] Under state law, it is unlawful for any person under the age of twenty-one (21) to buy, possess, transport (unless in the course of their employment and over the age of 18), or consume alcoholic beverages, including wine or beer. It is also unlawful for any adult to buy alcoholic beverages for or furnish them for any purpose to anyone under twenty-one years of age. These offenses are classified as Class A Misdemeanors punishable by imprisonment for not more than eleven months and twenty-nine days, or a fine of not more than $2,500, or both. (T.C.A. §§ 1-3-113, 39-15-404, 40-35-11, 57-5-301.) The offense of public intoxication is a Class C Misdemeanor punishable by 11 hours of community service, possible revocation of driver’s license, imprisonment of not more than thirty days or a fine of not more than $50, or both. (T.C.A. § 39-17-310.) Under Tennessee law, the offense of possession or casual exchange of a controlled substance (such as marijuana) is a Class A Misdemeanor punishable by eleven months twenty-nine days of imprisonment and/or a fine of $2,500). A third and subsequent offense of possession of 1/2 ounce or less of marijuana is punishable by one to six years of imprisonment and a $3,000 fine. If there is an exchange from a person over twenty-one years of age to a person under twenty-one, and the older person is at least two years older than the younger person, and the older person knows that the younger person is under twenty-one years of age, then the offense is classified as a felony. Possession of more than 1/2 ounce of marijuana under circumstances where intent to resell may be implicit is punishable by one to six years of imprisonment and a $5,000 fine for the first offense. (T.C.A. §§ 39-17-417, 39-17-418; 21 U.S.C. § 801, et seq.)

State penalties for possession of substantial quantities of a controlled substance or for manufacturing or distribution of a controlled substance range from fifteen to sixty years of imprisonment and a $500,000 fine. (Title 39, T.C.A., Chapter 17.) For example, possession of more than twenty-six grams of cocaine is punishable by eight to thirty years of imprisonment and a $200,000 fine for the first offense.

The state may, under certain circumstances, impound a vehicle used to transport or conceal controlled substances.

United States Penalties and Sanctions for Illegal Possession of a Controlled Substance

21 U.S.C. 844(a)

First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment and fine of at least $1,000.

After one prior drug conviction: At least fifteen days in prison, not to exceed two years, and fine of at least $2,500.

After two or more prior drug convictions: At least ninety days in prison, not to exceed three years, and fine of at least $5,000.

21 U.S.C. §§ 853(a)(2) and 881(a)(7)

Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one year imprisonment.

21 U.S.C. § 881(a)(4)

Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft, or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance. [An automobile may be impounded in cases involving any controlled substance in any amount.]

21 U.S.C. § 844a

Any individual who knowingly possesses a controlled substance in a personal use amount shall be liable to the United States for a civil penalty in an amount not to exceed $10,000 for each such violation.

21 U.S.C. § 862

Denial of federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g)

Ineligibility to receive or purchase a firearm or ammunition.

Miscellaneous

Revocation of certain federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, are vested within the authorities of individual federal agencies. Violations of federal trafficking laws that involve either (1) distribution or possession of controlled substances at or near a school or University campus, or (2) distribution of controlled substances to persons under twenty-one (21) years of age, incur doubled penalties under federal law. (See chart: Federal Trafficking Penalties.)

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Resources

As an educational institution, Vanderbilt University is primarily concerned with helping the individual student achieve academic goals and develop as a person. When health problems do arise, the University may assist and guide a student whose mental or physical health is threatened. Because of the health hazards associated with binge drinking and other forms of alcohol misuse, students who choose to drink alcohol should imbibe only in moderation. Should students or their friends have a problem with alcohol or other drugs, there are several places on campus where they can receive assistance:

These campus and community resources are available and ready to assist. Calls will be handled with respect for confidentiality.

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Health Risks

A general concern for all substances that alter self control or level of awareness is the risk of exposure to physical risks such as sexually transmitted infections, sexual assault, and dangerous decision making such as choosing to drive while under the influence. See also definitions and clarifications in Chapter 7, Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence. Perpetrators of sexual assault may use alcohol and other drugs to incapacitate their victims, intentionally.

Effects of High-Risk/Binge Drinking

Acute: High-risk or binge drinking can result in frequent colds, reduced resistance to infection, and increased risk of pneumonia; aggressive, irrational or violent behavior, depression, and anxiety.  The Center for Disease Control lists unintentional injury as the number one cause of death for individuals ages 15-24; impaired sensation leading to falls and driving under the influence are two contributing factors.  Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. It is important to recognize that individuals absorb alcohol at different rates leading to variable ranges of alcohol content in the body. Low to moderate levels of alcohol may also increase the incidence of impulsive actions potentially contributing to negative social and academic consequences. Moderate to high levels of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to problem solve, to process information and to remember information. Very high levels cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system such as benzodiazepines, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Chronic: Genetic predisposition, beginning use early in life, mental illness, and repeated long-term use of alcohol can lead to addiction.  Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways, and can affect the way the brain looks and works.  These disruptions can cause changes in mood and behavior, an inability to think clearly and move with coordination, temperature dysregulation, blackouts, sleep interference, loss of memory, and in extreme cases decreased brain volume. Additional potential long-term effects of high-risk drinking include cancer of the throat, mouth, and breast; liver damage, and stroke.

Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants may have abnormalities such as deficits in impulse control, and impaired concentrating, affecting academic performance, and be at risk for irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

Effects of Other Drugs

The National Institute on Drug Abuse website features a page on the health effects of a number of drugs. To assist the public in keeping current on drug related issues, the NIDA website also features a page on emerging drugs.

Illegal (Non-prescribed) Drugs:

Marijuana:  Marijuana can produce an altered sense of reality, poor coordination of movement, lowered reaction time, and study difficulties due to the reduced ability to learn and retain information. Individuals can also experience panic attacks, anxiety, hallucinations, and psychosis. 

Synthetic Cannabinoids:  Chemically related to THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, these drugs may cause the individuals who use them to experience high blood pressure, agitation, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, seizure, paranoia, and violent behavior.

Cocaine (stimulant):  Cocaine, crack, and related forms are highly addictive stimulant drugs.  Short-term effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, seizure, and coma.  In combination with alcohol there is an increased risk of overdose and sudden death.

Amphetamines (stimulants): Amphetamines, and their new derivatives “crystal,” “ice,” and Ecstasy (among other “street” names), are used for stimulation. These compounds are very addictive and may produce psychotic and violent behaviors.

LSD and PCP (hallucinogens):  These chemicals create a distortion of an individual’s ability to recognize reality. Use can cause delusions, paranoia, and at high levels, suicidal thoughts along with psychosis in some individuals. The long-term effects of PCP use include memory loss and depression. The negative effects of both PCP and LSD may continue after the drug is out of the system.

Heroin (narcotics):  These are among some of the most addictive substances known.  They produce a high or euphoria. Withdrawal can produce cramping, severe muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhea, fever and runny nose, sweating and cold sweats, and severe insomnia.  Overdose is common and can result in death. Use of a shared needle can increase the risk of contracting HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases.

Prescription Drugs:

Medications and prescribed drugs are safe when used as prescribed for clinical conditions. However, many prescribed drugs have the potential for abuse when used recreationally. Those listed below are some of the most frequently misused, and can lead to dependence. When abused, these drugs can be dangerous.

How can you help prevent prescription drug abuse?

If you have concerns or questions regarding the use and/or abuse of these prescription medications or others, ask for professional advice.

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Warning Signs of Possible Substance Abuse

When such signs appear in friends,

DO

DON’T

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Chapter 7: Sexual Misconduct and Intimate Partner Violence

 

Vanderbilt University is committed to equal opportunity and to maintaining a safe and healthy environment for all members of the University community, guests, and visitors.  The University’s policies, programs, and activities are designed to foster courtesy and respect.  The University prohibits and seeks to eliminate all forms of sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment and sexual assault, and intimate partner violence, which includes dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.  Under federal law, Vanderbilt has a duty to take steps to prevent and redress sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence.  Such conduct is contrary to Vanderbilt’s values, represents socially irresponsible behavior, and is not tolerated.  This policy addresses Vanderbilt’s obligations under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”) and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013.

In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Executive Order 11246, and the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, Vanderbilt University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, or genetic information in its administration of educational policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other University-administered programs; or employment.  In addition, consistent with the University’s nondiscrimination policy, the University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their gender expression.

This policy outlines the procedures that apply to allegations of sex discrimination, sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment and sexual assault, and intimate partner violence involving students.  It is applicable to all members of the Vanderbilt community with respect to conduct that occurs on and off campus, including conduct in connection with University programs and activities and conduct that otherwise interferes with or limits the ability of a member of the community to participate in or to receive benefits, services, or opportunities from the University’s programs or activities, regardless of whether the victim is an affiliate of the University.  Complaints and reports of sexual misconduct or intimate partner violence will be handled under the version of this policy in effect as of the date of the alleged incident; complaints and reports of conduct spanning more than one year will be handled under the version of the policy in effect at the time of the most recent alleged incident.  

The policy sets forth the specific types of conduct that are prohibited, as well as the resources and support services available to those in the Vanderbilt community who have been impacted by such conduct.  Vanderbilt encourages everyone affected by sexual misconduct or intimate partner violence, and everyone who suspects or witnesses such conduct, to report it.  The University will take prompt and effective action to address allegations of sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence, and it will resolve complaints and reports in a timely and fair manner.

Questions about the policy and its applicability to any alleged conduct may be directed to Vanderbilt’s Title IX Coordinator, who oversees compliance with applicable non-discrimination policies, including this policy:

Anita Jenious
Title IX Coordinator and Director,
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services (EAD)

Questions may also be directed to:

Damian Marshall
Title IX Compliance Manager

615-32(2-4705)
eadinformation@vanderbilt.edu,
110 21st Avenue South, Suite 808, Nashville, TN 37203

For purposes of this policy, the following terms and definitions will be used throughout:

EAD receives, directly or indirectly, all reports of sexual misconduct involving students that are not made to a confidential resource (see below). With the exceptions set forth in this policy, reports of sexual misconduct received by EAD will be investigated by EAD.

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Resources and Support

Any member of the Vanderbilt community who has experienced or been impacted by sexual misconduct, including prior to their affiliation with Vanderbilt, may seek immediate and/or ongoing assistance from one or more of the resources outlined below. Some of these resources are confidential; others are subject to mandatory reporting requirements. This policy indicates the level of confidentiality offered by the listed resources.

Confidential Resources

Some resources are confidential. Confidential resources include licensed professional counselors and mental health providers, such as those at the Psychological and Counseling Center and the Work/Life Connections - Employee Assistance Program; pastoral counselors acting in that capacity; and medical professionals acting in a patient-care role, such as those at the Student Health Center, the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Emergency Department, or other clinics or hospitals. These confidential resources do not report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator or anyone else without the permission of the person consulting them. Off-campus counselors and health care providers will also generally maintain confidentiality and not share information with the University unless the person consulting them requests the disclosure and signs a consent or waiver form. However, under state or federal law, all resources may have other reporting obligations. For example, healthcare providers and certain other individuals are required to notify law enforcement when someone seeks treatment for injuries caused by a violent crime, including sexual assault. Similarly, all persons are required to notify law enforcement when they receive a report of sexual abuse of a minor. Anyone who at first utilizes a confidential resource may later decide to make a report to a non-confidential resource, such as EAD or law enforcement.

Limited Confidential Resource

Individuals who work at the Project Safe Center, including front desk staff and graduate assistants, can generally talk to any person impacted by sexual misconduct without revealing any personally identifying information about an incident to others within the University. A person can seek assistance and support from Project Safe Center staff without triggering a University investigation that could reveal that person’s identity or that the person has disclosed the incident. However, a person who self-discloses to Project Safe Center staff that he/she/they (or other pronoun used by the student) engaged in a possible violation of this policy may not be entitled to limited confidentiality.

Without disclosing personally identifying information about the victim, the Project Safe Center will notify the Title IX Coordinator of the nature, date, time, and general location of an incident. The Project Safe Center will also notify the Title IX Coordinator of the name of the alleged perpetrator, if known, when the alleged perpetrator is affiliated with Vanderbilt University as a faculty member, staff member, teaching assistant, independent contractor, adviser, or in any other similar capacity, other than as a student. This notification helps keep the Title IX Coordinator informed of the general extent and nature of sexual violence on and off campus, and allows for tracking patterns, evaluating the scope of the problem, and formulating appropriate campus-wide responses.
Project Safe Center staff can assist in providing additional information, including potentially identifying information, to the Title IX Coordinator, if the victim so wishes. Anyone who at first notifies Project Safe Center staff may later decide to make a report to EAD or law enforcement.

Project Safe Center staff can assist a victim with interim measures; however, the provision of interim measures that involve a non-confidential University department or impact another person may require the disclosure of identifying information to the relevant department and person as well as the Title IX Coordinator.

While Project Safe Center staff may maintain a victim’s confidentiality vis-à-vis the University, they may have reporting obligations under state and federal law, which include:

In addition, if Project Safe Center staff determines that the respondent poses a serious and/or immediate threat to the University community (based on, for example, the nature and severity of the incident or whether there is a pattern of misconduct), they will disclose all relevant information to the appropriate University authorities, including, but not limited to, the Title IX Coordinator.

Project Safe Center staff will provide non-identifying information, similar to that provided to the Title IX Coordinator, to the Vanderbilt University Police Department (VUPD) for crime statistics reporting under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). The information reported may result in the issuance of a timely warning or security notice to the community, but the warning will not include any information that identifies the victim.

For more information about the services provided by the Project Safe Center and for contact information for Project Safe Center staff, please visit www.vanderbilt.edu/projectsafe.

Responsible Employees Who Are Mandatory Reporters Under Title IX

A responsible employee is a Vanderbilt employee who has a duty to report all alleged violations of this policy because the employee has the authority to address sexual misconduct or because a member of the University community could reasonably believe that the employee has such authority. Responsible employees are mandatory reporters; they are not confidential resources. Generally, with the exception of the confidential resources discussed above, a University employee to whom a community member reports an incident of sexual misconduct is a mandatory reporter. This includes faculty members, teaching assistants, and most staff. A non-exhaustive list of mandatory reporters is contained in the Appendix at the end of this policy.

Mandatory reporters are required to report possible violations of this policy to the Title IX Coordinator, Title IX Compliance Manager, or EAD staff (collectively, EAD). Mandatory reporters must report names, if known, and all relevant details about the alleged sexual misconduct, so that the University can take steps to address the matter promptly and resolve it fairly. Conversations with mandatory reporters are otherwise kept private to the extent possible and are only disclosed to those with a need or right to know.

Before a mandatory reporter receives any information regarding an instance of sexual misconduct, the mandatory reporter should seek to confirm that the reporting party understands the employee’s reporting obligations and, if the reporting party wants to maintain confidentiality, will direct the reporting party to a confidential resource.

If a victim wants to tell a mandatory reporter about an incident but does not want the report investigated or the victim’s name disclosed, the employee will tell the victim that the University will consider the request, but cannot guarantee that the University will be able to honor it. In reporting the details of an incident to EAD, the mandatory reporter will also inform EAD of the victim’s request for confidentiality.

Mandatory reporters will not pressure a victim or other reporting party either to request confidentiality or make a full report.

Contact Information for Resources

Any member of the Vanderbilt University community who has experienced sexual misconduct may seek immediate and/or ongoing assistance from one or more of the following resources. Many of the resources listed will provide assistance whether or not the victim chooses to make a report to EAD or law enforcement, or to participate in an investigation.

Victim Advocacy Services – CONFIDENTIAL (LIMITED)

Law Enforcement – NOT CONFIDENTIAL; VUPD IS MANDATORY REPORTER

Medical Service Providers – CONFIDENTIAL (*but required to notify law enforcement when someone seeks treatment for injuries caused by a violent crime)

Counseling Services – CONFIDENTIAL

Additional Support for Students – MANDATORY REPORTERS

Resources in the Community – NO MANDATORY REPORT TO VANDERBILT

Additional Information

The Vanderbilt University Police Department (VUPD) and the Metro Nashville Police Department (MNPD) are available for emergency response, facilitating medical transport, investigating incidents of a criminal nature, referrals, and advice concerning and/or assistance with preserving evidence. VUPD also provides support for crime victims and is available to accompany them to court. 

The medical service providers listed above are available to treat injuries and possible sexually transmitted diseases, as well as for other health services and consultations. The Vanderbilt University Medical Center Emergency Department (ED) may ask a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) to come to the ED to perform a forensic exam if the victim agrees. Please note that medical treatment and a forensic examination may aid in the preservation of relevant evidence. Even victims who are unsure as to whether or not they want to make a police report or take action against the respondent may wish to have a forensic examination; having a forensic exam facilitates the identification and preservation of physical evidence associated with the assault.

Tennessee law requires all medical personnel to report to law enforcement when someone seeks treatment for injuries caused by a violent crime, including sexual assault. Medical personnel are also required to report to law enforcement and/or Child Protective Services when a minor presents for treatment for any injury or condition that reasonably indicates it was caused by violence or abuse, including physical or sexual abuse. Medical personnel are also required to report to law enforcement and/or Adult Protective Services when certain vulnerable adults present and there is reasonable belief that they are victims of adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Upon request, a Victim Resource Specialist from the Project Safe Center will meet a student at a medical service provider, law enforcement agency, or other location for assistance or consultation. Project Safe Center Victim Resource Specialists are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. The Project Safe Center, Work/Life Connections - Employee Assistance Program, the Faculty and Physician Wellness Program, the Nurse Wellness Program, and the community resources listed above are also available to assist members of the Vanderbilt community.

Immediate Priority—Preserving Evidence: To help preserve evidence, victims are encouraged not to change clothes or bedding, take a shower, douche, or clean up until evidence has been collected by the police or SANE. Evidence may still be available even if the victim has changed clothes or cleaned up/showered. Therefore, victims should leave any clothes or bedding that may contain evidence unfolded and undisturbed, if possible. If clothing or bedding must be moved, each item should be kept separate to prevent transfer of body fluids or other trace evidence. Victims and witnesses should also not delete or destroy any potentially relevant video or text messages, messages through other social media outlets (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tinder, Grindr, etc.), emails, voicemails, written notes, or any other media, including hard-copy documents.

Interim Measures

Vanderbilt will implement appropriate interim measures on its own initiative or in response to a request from a complainant or respondent. Interim measures are intended to provide temporary support and relief to the parties involved in or affected by sexual misconduct. Such measures will remain in effect as long as necessary, depending on the relevant facts and circumstances.

Parties may request interim measures from EAD, the Project Safe Center, the Office of Student Accountability, Community Standards, and Academic Integrity (Student Accountability) or the Associate Dean of Students for Community Standards and Student Support. Parties may request interim measures even in cases where an investigation is not undertaken or either party has declined to participate in the University proceeding or the criminal process. In all instances, the Title IX Coordinator will be apprised of the measure(s) provided.

Interim measures for students may include, but are not limited to:

Interim measures for faculty and staff may include, but are not limited to:

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Offenses and Definitions

 Offenses

The following conduct is prohibited:

Definitions of Specific Offenses

Whether the alleged conduct constitutes abuse or the threat of abuse will depend on a number of factors, including, but not limited to, the nature, severity, and frequency of the conduct.

These definitions may or may not be the same as those for criminal offenses under Tennessee state law. 

Clarifications

Force includes physical force (such as pushing, hitting, pinning down), threats (direct or indirect expressions of intent to inflict harm to self or others), intimidation (implied or indirect threats), and/or other forms of coercion.

To coerce is to exert power or control over another person by use of force, pressure, manipulation, threats, or intimidation.  Determinations regarding whether actions or statements amount to coercion will be made on a case-by-case basis.  For example, repeated advances or requests to engage in sexual activity may or may not amount to coercion depending on all of the relevant facts and circumstances.

Alcohol and drugs
The impact of alcohol and other drugs varies from person to person.  A person wishing to engage in sexual activity with another whom the person knows or reasonably should know has consumed alcohol or other drugs must specifically determine the capacity of the other person to provide “effective consent,” as explained below.  Depending on the level of a person’s intoxication, the person may or may not be able to give effective consent.  Determinations regarding whether a person’s level of intoxication affects the person’s ability to give effective consent will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Intoxication refers to a state of stupefaction, exhilaration or euphoria resulting from the ingestion of alcohol or other chemical substances.

Incapacitation means the inability to make or carry out a rational, reasonable decision.  One who is incapacitated cannot give effective consent.  Incapacitation can result from intoxication from alcohol or other drugs, or from the voluntary or involuntary taking of GHB, Rohypnol, Burundang, Ketamine, or other sedatives or “date-rape” drugs.  Evidence of incapacitation may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following:

Blacking out is an amnesia-like state that may be brought on by drugs, heavy drinking, or intoxication; blacking out is not necessarily incompatible with the ability to engage in simple or even complex behavior.  Afterwards the person has no recollection of all or part of the events that occurred during the blackout.  There is a distinction between passing out (falling asleep or becoming unconscious) due to drug or alcohol use and blacking out in that a person in a blackout remains conscious and operative.

Blacking out, incapacitation, and intoxication do not provide a valid explanation or excuse for engaging in any form of sexual misconduct.

Effective Consent is consent that is informed and freely and actively given.  Effective consent requires mutually understandable words or actions indicating a willingness to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Depending on the facts and circumstances, intent may or may not be required to violate this policy.  For example, engaging in intercourse without obtaining effective consent constitutes a violation of the policy regardless of intent.  On the other hand, intent may be an appropriate consideration in some instances (such as when one person brushes up against another person in a crowded room).

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Reporting an Incident

Vanderbilt takes reports of sexual misconduct seriously.  How the University responds depends upon a variety of factors, including the wishes of the victim, the facts and circumstances of the specific incident, to whom it was reported, and the University’s obligations under applicable federal and state laws.

As previously explained, there are various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to members of the University community to enable them to make informed choices about where to turn should they experience sexual misconduct.  This section provides information about additional options for disclosure and reporting an incident.

Anonymous and Third-Party Reporting

The University encourages victims of sexual misconduct to talk to someone to ensure their health and wellbeing.  The University provides several resources for anonymous reporting for victims who do not wish to be identified.  Vanderbilt has established a hotline for anonymous reporting through the Vanderbilt University Compliance Reporting Hotline, an independently-operated compliance hotline that may be used to report incidents of apparent wrongdoing on campus.  The Compliance Reporting Hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year at 844-814-5935 or at https://www.vanderbiltcompliancehotline.ethicspoint.com.  Anonymous reports may also be made to the Project Safe Center at 615-322-7233.  Students may also report anonymously to the Community Standards hotline at 615-343-7867.  NOTE: These resources, aside from the Project Safe Center, should not be used for immediate assistance.

Vanderbilt encourages third parties to report incidents of sexual misconduct to EAD, VUPD, or MNPD.  Third parties may also report incidents to any mandatory reporter or through the anonymous reporting resources identified above.  The University may not be able to move forward based on a third-party report if the victim does not wish to cooperate with an investigation.  After providing a report, third parties are not entitled to information about the University’s investigation and response due to privacy concerns and applicable federal and state laws.

Vanderbilt encourages anyone who witnesses, experiences, or has information about possible sexual misconduct to take reasonable actions to prevent or stop such actions.  Reasonable actions may include, depending on all relevant facts and circumstances, reporting the behavior (in accordance with the reporting options outlined above), directly intervening when it is safe and reasonable to do so or contacting law enforcement.  Bystander intervention is an effective means by which to reduce sexual misconduct in our community.  Vanderbilt uses Green Dot, a bystander intervention program, available through the Project Safe Center.  A person who has been subjected to sexual misconduct need not confront the other party; the appropriate process to address the conduct is through this policy.

Public Awareness Events

Public awareness events such as “Take Back the Night,” the Clothesline Project, candlelight vigils, protests, “survivor speak-outs,” or other forums in which students disclose incidents of sexual violence are not considered notice to the University of sexual misconduct for purposes of triggering its obligation to investigate any particular incident.  To ensure that an event meets this definition, the organizing party must obtain clearance through the Office of the Dean of Students.  Such events may, however, inform the need for campus-wide education and prevention efforts, and the University will provide information about students’ Title IX rights at these events.

Protection of Minors on Campus

Vanderbilt University is dedicated to the welfare and safety of minors who visit Vanderbilt’s campus, who participate in Vanderbilt’s programs and activities, or who are entrusted to Vanderbilt’s care.  Minors participating in Vanderbilt programs and activities are expected to be supervised while on campus, and every adult member of the Vanderbilt community is required to follow the Code of Conduct When Interacting with Minors. Every member of the University community (not limited to individuals who interact with minors) is required by law to report known or suspected instances of the abuse of, neglect of, or inappropriate interactions with minors.  Members making a report in good faith are protected from criminal and civil liability for making a report.  Everyone is required by Tennessee law to report any type of suspected abuse, neglect, or inadequate care, in addition to suspected child sexual abuse.

All allegations involving the abuse of minors (as explained below) must be reported to law enforcement and the University. Two reports, one external and one internal, must be made:

The Office of Risk and Insurance Management can also answer policy and procedure questions related to protecting minors on campus and in Vanderbilt programs and activities.  Please email protectionofminors@vanderbilt.edu for more information. 

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Investigations

The University recommends that reports of sexual misconduct be made to EAD.  If a person chooses to make an initial report to any other mandatory reporter, the mandatory reporter will refer the matter to EAD.  EAD has responsibility for investigating reports of sexual misconduct.  Retaliation is prohibited against any person who makes a report, participates in an investigation, encourages reporting an incident, or opposes sexual misconduct.

The University encourages community members to report violations of this policy as soon as possible after an incident, but violations can be reported at any time.  If EAD determines that a report should be addressed by another department, EAD will direct the reporting party and/or the complainant to the appropriate department and refer the matter to that department.  EAD will also investigate incidents that have been reported to other University officials and referred to EAD.

To report an incident to EAD, please contact Anita Jenious, the University’s Title IX Coordinator and Director of EADCall EAD at 615-322-4705, visit the office, or write.  EAD will provide a written notice to all involved parties of their rights, the confidential and other resources available to them, their reporting options, and the procedures that EAD will follow.

Email Address:
eadinformation@vanderbilt.edu

Campus Address:
Baker Building, Suite 808

Located at
110 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203

Mailing Address:
PMB 401809
2301 Vanderbilt Place
Nashville, TN 37240-1809

Persons making a report to EAD should provide as much of the following information as possible: what happened, where, and when; names of all parties involved, including witnesses who were present and/or have relevant knowledge (identify them, state what they know, and inform EAD how they can be contacted); supporting documentation (such as videos, emails, photos, text messages, or messages through social media); any other evidence; and contact information.  Everyone is encouraged to report sexual misconduct even if some or all information is unavailable or cannot be provided.

If a person calls or visits EAD, a staff member will explain the role of EAD, the options for reporting an incident, and the available resources for assistance, including interim measures that may be appropriate.  In addition, EAD will explain how any request for confidentiality will be evaluated and that confidentiality may limit the University’s ability to investigate the incident.

Determining Whether to Proceed with an Investigation 

EAD will conduct an intake process to assist the Title IX Coordinator in determining how to proceed with a sexual misconduct report and whether interim measures are needed.  The intake process may include preliminary interviews of the complainant, respondent, or witnesses, consultation with other University offices (including Student Accountability, Human Resources, the appropriate Dean’s office, and other departments, as appropriate), and an initial review of potentially relevant evidence.  Both the complainant and the respondent will be permitted to ask an adviser of their choosing to accompany them to meetings related to the report of a violation of the policy, including with EAD.

The Title IX Coordinator considers a variety of factors in determining whether to conduct an investigation, including but not limited to the wishes of the complainant, any previous allegations involving the respondent, the likelihood of repeated offenses, evidence that the alleged misconduct is part of a pattern of misconduct, and the University’s commitment to deter conduct that creates or contributes to a hostile environment.  In no circumstances will mediation be used to resolve cases of sexual assault.  Appropriate interim measures will be implemented whether or not an investigation is commenced. 

If a complainant initially requests that no investigation occur, and EAD determines it will not proceed, the complainant is not precluded from later requesting that an investigation be conducted, and from cooperating with the investigation.  In addition, if a complainant initially requests that no investigation occur or chooses not to participate, and EAD determines it will proceed after weighing the factors listed above, the complainant is not precluded from later cooperating with the investigation.  If a complainant is undecided as to whether he/she/they would like to request and/or participate in an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator will consider a variety of factors, as discussed above, in determining whether to conduct an investigation.

If the Title IX Coordinator determines that EAD should proceed with an investigation, EAD will notify the complainant and either EAD or Student Accountability will notify the respondent.  EAD will ask complainants who decline to participate whether they wish to receive the preliminary and/or final investigative report.  Whenever the complainant and/or respondent chooses not to cooperate with an investigation, EAD will move forward based on the available information and evidence. 

Requests for Confidentiality During an Investigation

If a complainant requests that his/her/their name or other identifying details not be revealed to the respondent (request for confidentiality), Vanderbilt’s ability to investigate the incident and address the matter may be limited.  All such requests will be evaluated by the Title IX Coordinator, taking into consideration the factors listed in the section above. Even if the Title IX Coordinator determines not to investigate a report, based in whole or in part on the complainant’s decision not to cooperate or request for confidentiality, the University will take actions, as appropriate, to mitigate the effects of the alleged sexual misconduct and prevent its recurrence.  Such actions may include, depending on all of the relevant facts and circumstances, increased monitoring, supervision, or security at locations or activities where the alleged misconduct occurred; providing training and education for students and employees; and revising and publicizing the University’s policies on sexual misconduct.

Charging, and the Investigative Process

Upon a determination by the Title IX Coordinator that an investigation involving a student respondent will be conducted, EAD will normally provide a summary of the allegations to the Director of Student Accountability or designee (collectively, Student Accountability).  Student Accountability may request any additional information or documents that have been obtained by EAD.  Student Accountability will determine the charge(s) to be brought, if any, and present the charge(s) and the range of possible sanctions to the respondent.  The charge(s) may be modified at any point based on information provided to or developed by EAD during its investigation.  After the presentation of the charge(s), the respondent will have the opportunity to agree or disagree with each of them.  The charge sheet will be sent to EAD. 

Whether or not Student Accountability has already presented charges, EAD will inform the respondent of the allegations, provide the respondent an opportunity to respond to the allegations, ask questions, provide information, and offer names of witnesses or other people with relevant information.  An EAD investigator will interview the respondent and other individuals who, in the investigator’s judgment, may have pertinent knowledge.  Potentially relevant information and documents may be collected from the complainant, respondent, witnesses, and third parties.  Student witnesses are strongly encouraged to cooperate with EAD investigations.  As the investigation progresses, the investigator may seek to conduct follow-up interviews with any person as the investigator deems necessary and appropriate.  If the complainant or the respondent learns of, or remembers, any additional information during the course of the investigation, he/she/they should notify the EAD investigator immediately.  EAD will prepare summaries of its interviews, and the complainant and the respondent will be given the opportunity to review and revise the summary of their own interviews.

Prior to making a final determination, EAD will prepare a preliminary investigative report.  The preliminary investigative report will contain a summary of the information and documents EAD considers relevant.  The complainant and respondent will each have the opportunity to review a copy of the preliminary investigative report.  To the extent possible under the circumstances of each case, other evidence, such as video, will be shared with both parties at the same time.  The names and other identifying information of other students will be redacted from the preliminary investigative report to the extent required by federal or state law.  Both the complainant and respondent will have the opportunity to submit written comments on the preliminary investigative report.  Any such comments, which shall be no longer than five (5) double-spaced pages with one (1) inch margins and twelve (12) point font, must be submitted either by hand delivery to EAD, 110 21st Avenue South, Suite 975, or by email attachment to the EAD investigator by no later than 5pm on the fifth (5th) calendar day following the date the complainant and respondent receive the preliminary investigative report.  Requests for extensions must be submitted to EAD prior to the expiration of the five-day period.

EAD may investigate and make findings of fact regarding possible violations of other University policies that may have contributed to or arisen from, or that otherwise relate to, alleged violations of this policy (e.g., where an alleged sexual assault was allegedly committed by a student who may have also violated Vanderbilt’s alcohol and controlled substances policy).  The relevant facts and information will then be shared with Student Accountability or the appropriate department for further action.  If the conduct complained of involves only a possible violation of another University policy that is not alleged or determined by EAD to have contributed to or arisen from or that does not otherwise relate to a violation of this policy, or if the conduct complained of involves only a possible violation of another policy, EAD will refer the report to the department responsible for investigating and/or resolving such reports.  If the report does not allege conduct that violates any University policy, the matter will be closed.

Retaliation

Retaliation is any adverse action threatened or taken, whether personally or through a third party, against another person because they have complained about, reported, or participated in the investigation or disposition of alleged sexual misconduct.  Retaliation in an effort to discourage a person from reporting sexual misconduct or participating in a sexual misconduct investigation, or to punish a person for doing so, is also prohibited.  Retaliation includes purposely interfering with, threatening, or damaging the academic or professional reputation, career, or co-curricular experience of another individual before, during, or after the investigation and/or resolution of a report under this policy.  The University will take appropriate action to address any reports of retaliation.  In addition, interference in any manner with an investigation is prohibited. 

Advisers

Both the complainant and the respondent will be permitted to ask one adviser of their choosing to accompany them to all meetings related to the report of a violation of the policy.  The adviser for either party may confer privately with that party, but the adviser may not speak on behalf of the complainant or respondent or otherwise participate in any meeting.  An adviser’s failure to comply with these guidelines may result in the termination of the meeting or the adviser no longer being permitted to be present.

University personnel employed in the offices responsible for the process described in this policy, along with those in the chain of command above them, personnel employed by the Office of the General Counsel, and others whose participation could create a conflict of interest with their University duties are not eligible to serve as advisers.  Other University personnel, including mandatory reporters, as well as people not affiliated with the University, may serve as advisers.  Student Accountability maintains a list of trained staff members who can serve in this role.  Persons who may be potential witnesses in the matter are not permitted to serve as advisers to the parties.  If there is a question or concern about a possible adviser, please consult with EAD.

Recordings and Evidence

The audio and/or video recording of any meeting conducted as part of an investigation under this policy is prohibited. The Title IX Coordinator shall decide in each case whether to receive evidence from experts or other witnesses.  Under no circumstances, however, will the use of polygraph examinations be permitted.

Past Relationships and Conduct

Previous sexual relationships of the complainant and respondent with others are generally irrelevant.  A past, present, or ongoing sexual relationship between the parties may or may not be deemed relevant by EAD.  For example, past sexual activity between the parties may provide insight on communication patterns for purposes of determining if effective consent was granted on a particular occasion.  

Standard of Proof

Vanderbilt uses the preponderance of the evidence standard of proof at every stage of the investigative process to determine responsibility for violations of this policy.  Proof meets the preponderance standard if EAD determines it is “more likely than not” that the policy was violated.

Determinations

EAD will consider any comments received from the complainant and/or respondent after reviewing the preliminary investigative report, and will conduct any further investigation and advise the parties of any additional evidence, as appropriate.  Thereafter, EAD will issue a final investigative report that sets forth (a) EAD’s final determination, based on a preponderance of the evidence, whether the respondent engaged in sexual misconduct in violation of this policy, and (b) if appropriate, any relevant recommendations.  The final investigative report will contain a summary of the information and documents on which the final determination and any recommendations are based and will address, to the extent EAD considers appropriate, any comments received from the complainant or respondent concerning the preliminary investigative report.  The comments from the complainant and respondent will also be attached as an exhibit.  EAD will provide its final investigative report simultaneously to the complainant and the respondent.  The names and other identifying information of other students will be redacted from the final investigative report to the extent required by federal or state law.  When the respondent is determined to have engaged in the conduct for which the respondent was charged, the final investigative report will also be forwarded to the appropriate person for sanctioning, referral, or follow-up (Director of Student Accountability for students, Dean of the appropriate School for faculty, appropriate supervisor/manager and Human Resources consultant for staff, etc.).  EAD will also forward a summary of any evidence it received concerning possible violations of other policies to the office or department responsible for enforcement of such policies. 

Timeline

The University endeavors to conduct and complete the investigative process within 60 calendar days from the time the Title IX Coordinator determines that an investigation will go forward.  Given the many variables and factors that may arise in such cases, good cause may exist for extending the time needed in some cases, such as those involving multiple witnesses and complicated evidence.  The complainant and the respondent will be notified simultaneously, in writing, if the investigation process cannot be completed within 60 days, and they will be provided with a revised timeline.

EAD’s ability to complete the investigative process within 60 days is enhanced when students, witnesses, and other third parties respond promptly to requests for information, interviews, and meetings.  The timeline will generally be as follows (calculated in calendar days):

Preservation of Investigative Materials

Materials obtained by EAD during the investigation will be maintained by EAD.

Parallel Investigations with Law Enforcement

Criminal complaints may be filed with either VUPD or MNPD.  VUPD and MNPD are not confidential resources; VUPD is a mandatory reporter.  Victims may also decline to report to these authorities. 

Vanderbilt University Police Department
2800 Vanderbilt Place
Nashville, TN 37212
615-322-2745
Emergency – 911 or 615-42(1-1911)
http://police.vanderbilt.edu/

Metro Nashville Police Department Headquarters
200 James Robertson Parkway
Nashville, TN 37201
615-862-7400
Emergency – 911
http://www.police.nashville.gov

Civil or criminal proceedings are separate and distinct from the process described in this policy for investigating and resolving sexual misconduct reports, and they may or may not run parallel to one another.  The University may be required by law to provide information to civil or criminal authorities or in civil or criminal proceedings.  The filing of a police report or the pendency of civil or criminal proceedings does not preclude EAD or any other department of Vanderbilt University from proceeding with its investigation and determination.  The investigation and determination may be delayed until the police have finished gathering evidence but generally will not wait for the conclusion of any criminal proceeding.  Vanderbilt encourages its students, faculty, and staff to report crimes to law enforcement.  Project Safe Center staff are available to accompany victims who choose to report an incident to law enforcement.

When VUPD receives information concerning conduct that may be criminal, including sexual assault, it may contact MNPD.  Typically, VUPD and MNPD detectives work together to assist victims.  In most sexual assault cases, VUPD will provide assistance and MNPD will be the primary investigating agency.  For other sexual misconduct cases, VUPD may conduct the investigation and keep MNPD informed.  Regardless of whether VUPD or MNPD conducts the primary investigation, individuals may contact VUPD about the incident at any time.  VUPD is available on request to assist victims in working with MNPD and in court proceedings.  

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Additional Information for Students

 Limited Disciplinary Immunity for Complainants and Witnesses

The University understands that individuals with information about sexual misconduct may hesitate to come forward if they fear that their own violations of University policy would be revealed.  While Vanderbilt does not condone any violations of its policies, the University will generally extend immunity for possession or use of alcohol or drugs and any resulting intoxication to victims and potential witnesses in order to facilitate reporting and resolution of sexual misconduct incidents.  Students may be referred for an alcohol or drug assessment and counseling.

Stay Away Orders

Given the nature of cases involving sexual misconduct, a student may request issuance of a stay away order.  For more detailed information about interim measures, please refer to the “Interim Measures” section above.  Stay away orders often require that the complainant and respondent have no contact with each other during the course of the investigation and/or thereafter.  The University may also employ such orders and implement other interim measures on its own initiative, as appropriate.  Additional information about stay away orders may be found in Chapter 3 of the Student Handbook under the section, “Threat, Harassment, Intimidation, Etc.: Stay Away Orders,” and questions may be directed to Student Accountability.

Students may also seek orders of protection, restraining orders, or other similar orders issued by a court of law and may be assisted in doing so by representatives from University offices, including, for example, the Project Safe Center, the Office of Housing and Residential Education, and VUPD. If a student obtains an order of protection or similar order issued by a court, the student should share that information with VUPD and the Project Safe Center so the University can assist.

Sanctioning

Where the respondent is a student, and EAD has determined that the respondent violated this policy, Student Accountability will review EAD’s final investigative report and will render an appropriate sanction.  If, upon reviewing the materials, Student Accountability requires clarification or additional information from EAD before rendering a sanction, Student Accountability may request such clarification or additional information from EAD.  The sanctioning determination will be made based on the information contained in the EAD investigative report, with particular regard for the nature of the incident, the respondent’s reported cooperation and candor, and the respondent’s disciplinary history (if any).

Student Accountability will notify the complainant and the respondent simultaneously and in writing of the sanction imposed. 

The guidelines for sanctions in sexual misconduct cases are set forth below.  See also the “Sanctions” section of Chapter 3 of the Student Handbook.

Appeals

Student parties have the right to appeal the determination by EAD and the sanction (if any) rendered by Student Accountability.  Student parties will be notified simultaneously in writing of this right and the procedures for appeal.

Student appeals will be decided by a panel of three Appellate Officers for Sexual Misconduct (Appellate Officers).  Appellate Officers will be faculty and/or administrators appointed by the Chancellor (or the Chancellor’s designee) for two- or three-year terms, who will receive annual training on issues involved in sexual misconduct, such as relevant evidence, the appeals process, standards of review, and avoiding actual or perceived conflicts of interest.  Assignment to cases will be on a rotating basis.  Any appeal of a finding of a violation of another University policy (and/or sanction for that violation) which arises out of or is related to an alleged violation of this policy will be decided under the process set forth in this policy by the Appellate Officers for Sexual Misconduct.

An Appellate Officer may not consider an appeal if the Appellate Officer has a conflict of interest.  Each Appellate Officer is responsible for determining whether or not a conflict of interest exists and may consult with the Dean of Students or designee or the Office of the General Counsel, if necessary.  If a conflict does exist, the case is assigned to the next panelist in the rotation.

A petition for appeal, signed by the petitioning student, must be submitted in writing to the Appellate Officers, either by hand delivery to 310 Sarratt, or by email attachment to appeals@vanderbilt.edu, by no later than 5pm on the tenth (10th) calendar day following the date that notice of the determination by EAD (when the respondent is found not to have violated the policy) is sent to the parties, or following the date the complainant and respondent are notified of the sanction.  Requests for extensions must be submitted prior to the expiration of the ten-day period. 

The petition must be no longer than ten (10) double-spaced pages with one (1) inch margins and twelve (12) point font.  The petition must include the following: a statement of the grounds for appeal, supporting explanation, and copies of, or reference to, all information not previously submitted to EAD that the petitioner wishes the Appellate Officers to consider.  Except for new information, as defined below, no documents or other evidence will be considered on appeal unless previously submitted to EAD.

Grounds for Appeal

The four grounds for appeal are as follows:

EAD and Student Accountability are expected to conduct investigations and proceedings in accordance with their policies and procedures.  Deviations from those policies and procedures, which render their actions fundamentally unfair, constitute a sufficient basis for the Appellate Officers to reverse, modify, or remand the determination by EAD and/or the sanction imposed by Student Accountability.  Procedural irregularities that are considered by the Appellate Officers to be harmless and that did not, in the judgment of the Appellate Officers, materially affect the process are not a basis for upsetting the determination by EAD and/or the sanction imposed by Student Accountability.

It is not the role of Appellate Officers to substitute their judgment for the judgment of EAD if there is a reasonable basis for EAD’s determination based on a preponderance of the evidence.  Deference must be given to EAD’s determination since EAD had the opportunity to hear the witnesses and to assess their credibility and demeanor.  The Appellate Officers may not alter EAD’s determination unless, in the Appellate Officers’ assessment, the determination is not reasonably supported by a preponderance of the evidence.

All available evidence is expected to be presented to EAD before it prepares its final investigative report.  A student who seeks to offer new evidence in support of an appeal must show that the evidence was not reasonably available for presentation to EAD, and that the introduction of such new evidence can be reasonably expected to have changed EAD’s determination.  If the Appellate Officers determine that the student has satisfied this burden, the Appellate Officers shall remand the case to EAD with instructions to reconsider the case in light of the new evidence.

The Appellate Officers may not substitute their judgment for the reasonable decision of Student Accountability with respect to sanctions.  However, sanctions may be vacated or changed upon a finding, based on the totality of relevant facts and circumstances, that the sanctions imposed by Student Accountability are the product of an abuse of discretion.  Abuse of discretion does not necessarily imply an intentional wrong or bad faith. 

Consideration of Petition and Determination of Appeal

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Procedures for Faculty

If, after receiving information from or consulting with EAD, the Dean for the appropriate school, or the Provost’s office, determines that the disciplinary process should be initiated, the Dean will follow the process for violations of the faculty standards of conduct set out in the Faculty Manual.

http://vanderbilt.edu/faculty-manual/part-iv-disciplinary-actions-and-grievances/ch1-disciplinary-actions/

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Procedures for Staff

If, after receiving information from or consulting with EAD, the staff member’s department, in consultation with Human Resources, determines that the disciplinary process should be initiated, the process for violations of Human Resources policies will be followed..

http://hr.vanderbilt.edu/policies/index.php

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Procedures for Postdoctoral Fellows and Trainees

If, after receiving information from or consulting with EAD, the fellow or trainee’s department, in consultation with the appropriate Dean’s office, determines that the disciplinary process should be initiated, the process for similar conduct violations will be followed.

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Prevention, Education, and Training

Vanderbilt provides numerous programs that address sexual misconduct, including the related issue of alcohol and drug abuse.  Vanderbilt’s programs include Haven – Understanding Sexual Assault (an online prevention module), The Escalation Workshop, True Life at Vanderbilt, Vanderbilt Visions, AlcoholEdu, and Green Dot.  A number of individual departments and offices, including EAD and the Project Safe Center, and student organizations also provide regular and ongoing programming on these important issues.

Vanderbilt also provides regular and ongoing training to faculty and staff, including the Provost, the Deans of the various schools, and Human Resources:

The Title IX Coordinator, EAD staff, the Director of Student Accountability, and Project Safe Center staff are trained at least annually, and on an ongoing basis, on issues related to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, and intimate partner violence, and in conducting investigations in a manner that protects the well-being and safety of the complainant, the respondent, and the University community.  University law enforcement personnel, mandatory reporters, and others involved in responding to sexual misconduct and intimate partner violence cases receive training as well.

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Federal Statistical Reporting Obligations

Under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), the University is required to report statistical information regarding sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking occurring on campus and on non-campus property controlled by the University and utilized by students.  Personally identifiable information is not included, but information must be provided to VUPD regarding the nature of the incident, the date it occurred, and its general location (e.g., on or off campus, in residential housing, or in the surrounding area) for publication in the Annual Security Report.  This report helps to provide the community with information regarding the extent and nature of campus crime and security measures on campus, to ensure greater community safety.

Mandated federal reporters, known as Campus Security Authorities, include: campus law enforcement; Student Accountability; the Title IX Coordinator and EAD staff; Residential Education staff (including Resident Advisers); advisers to student organizations; designated staff within the Office of the Dean of Students and its offices; coaches and other designated staff within the Department of Athletics; and anyone else with significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

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Federal Timely Warning Reporting Obligations

Under the Clery Act, VUPD must issue timely warnings, also known as security notices, with respect to crimes that pose a serious or continuing threat of bodily harm or danger to members of the campus community.  The victim’s name will never be disclosed and the University will make every effort to ensure that any other identifying information is not disclosed, while still providing enough information for community members to make safety decisions in light of the danger.  In addition, VUPD must issue immediate notifications, also known as “VUAlerts,” upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students, faculty, or staff occurring on campus.  

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Appendix: List of Responsible Employees

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