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Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
January 24, 2017

Graduate Student Meeting

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Clinical Program Discussion


CCN Brown Bag Series
January 25, 2017

Marty Singer

Chairman & CEO (Retired)

PCTEL

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 113

“An Experimental Psychologist in Business”

Marty Singer, a graduate of Vanderbilt’s Ph.D. Experimental Psychology program (1977) will discuss his career in telecommunications technology and the application of measurement and analytic tools in that environment.  Marty spent time at Bell Labs, Tellabs, and Motorola before taking on CEO positions at Safco Technologies (now owned by Agilent) and PCTEL (PCTI: Nasdaq).  He has ten patents, developed products that are deployed globally, and believes strongly in data-driven business strategies.  Recently retired from his 15 year stint as PCTEL’s Chairman and CEO, Marty also invests in Broadway musicals (Rent, Avenue Q, In The Heights, West Side Story, The Last Ship [Sting] and Hamilton) and will be happy to discuss those experiences as well.

 

 


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
January 26, 2017

Thomas Reppert

Department of Psychology (Schall Lab)

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

“Neural mechanisms of speed-accuracy tradeoff of visual search in superior colliculus”

Balancing the speed-accuracy tradeoff (SAT) is necessary for successful behavior. Using a visual search task with interleaved cues emphasizing speed or accuracy, a recent publication reported diverse contributions of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons instantiating salience evidence and response preparation. I will report data collected in the superior colliculus in two more macaque monkeys. As observed in the FEF, speed-accuracy tradeoff is accomplished through several distinct adjustments. Visually-responsive neurons modulated baseline firing rate, sensory gain, and the timecourse of salience evidence. Unlike FEF, movement neurons triggered saccades when discharge rates reached a level that was invariant across SAT conditions.  The results demonstrate that subcortical as well as cortical processing contributes to SAT.

 


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
January 31, 2017

Jonathan Becker

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


CCN Brown Bag Series
February 1, 2017

Michael Bess

Department of History

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 113

Title & Abstract TBA


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
February 2, 2017

Jake Westerberg

Department of Psychology - Maier Lab

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Layer-specific differences between spontaneous and visually evoked correlated variability in V1

Correlated variability between cortical neurons affects sensory coding and perceptual decision making. Previous work has established that neurons across the layers of visual cortex differ systematically in their spontaneous activity as well as in the degree to which they are correlated in their visual response. However, we know little about how spontaneously occurring neuronal correlations are related to those evoked under sensory stimulation. Here we investigate correlated population spiking responses within and across the layers of macaque primary visual cortex (V1), and compare their spatial structure during fixation and under visual stimulation. We placed linear multielectrode arrays spanning all layers of V1 in two monkeys that were trained to passively fixate on a screen while grating stimuli were presented to the receptive field of neurons under study (n=63 penetrations). Electrodes were aligned and laminar compartments delineated using current source density analysis. We extracted multiunit activity as a measure of population activity within the supragranular, granular and infragranular laminar compartments and computed the degree of correlated spiking across electrode contacts for the average spiking activity before and after visual stimulation. We found that spontaneously correlated spiking across all layers is significantly greater than that obtained from a randomized trial-shuffle control. However, the degree of the spontaneously generated correlated spiking varied systematically between layers. Visual stimulation both increased and decreased correlated variability in a layer-specific manner even though spiking increased uniformly across the entire cortical column. Taken together, these findings suggest that the laminar profile of visually evoked spiking correlations differs from the spatial structure of spontaneously occurring correlated activity.


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
February 7, 2017

Pamela Beck Drury

private Clinical Practice

Nashville

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


CCN Brown Bag Series
February 8, 2017

Michael Cole

Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience

Rutgers University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 113

Title & Abstract TBA


Neuroscience Brown Bag Series
February 9, 2017

Sonia Poltoratski

Department of Psychology (Tong Lab)

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


Clinical Science Brown Bag Series
February 14, 2017

Sohee Park

Department of Psychology

Vanderbilt University

12:10pm

Wilson Hall Room 316

Title & Abstract TBA


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