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Adriane E. Seiffert

Senior Lecturer and Research Assistant Professor

Dr. Seiffert's research is directed towards understanding how visual information that changes over time is assimilated into mental representations that direct actions. Traditional investigations in psychology have emphasized the static; for example, how people recognize objects, how people remember lists, or how people attend to images. Now is the time to move forward by recognizing that these abilities are inherently dynamic and exploring the active nature of recognition, memory and attention. In the Perception, Attention and Control lab, Dr. Seiffert and her colleagues are learning how the attributes people see determine where they attend, how they look and what they expect to see later.

 

Lab Website

Representative Publications

  • Lappin, J. S., Morse, D. L. & Seiffert, A. E. (2016). The channel capacity of visual awareness divided among multiple moving objects. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, in press.
  • Harriott, C., Seiffert, A., Hayes, S., & Adams, J. (2014). Biologically-Inspired Human-Swarm Interaction Metrics. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2014.
  • Thomas, L. E. & Seiffert, A. E. (2013). Looking ahead: Attending to anticipatory locations increases perception of control. Consciousness and Cognition, 22(1), 375-38.
  • Jardine, N. & Seiffert, A. E. (2011). Tracking objects that move where they are headed. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 73, 2168-2179
  • Thomas, L. & Seiffert, A. E. (2010). Self-motion impairs multiple object tracking. Cognition, 117(1), 80-86. 
  • St. Clair, R. L., Huff, M. & Seiffert, A. E. (2010). Conflicting motion information impairs multiple object tracking. Journal of Vision, 10(4), 18.
  • Fehd, H. & Seiffert, A. E. (2010). Looking at the center of the targets helps multiple object tracking. Journal of Vision.
  • Dewey, J., Seiffert, A. E. & Carr, T. (2010) Taking Credit for Success: The Phenomenology of Control in a Goal-Directed Task. Consciousness & Cognition. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2009.09.007
  • Ko, P. C. & Seiffert, A. E. (2009). Updating objects in visual short-term memory is feature selective.
  • Tombu, M. & Seiffert, A. E. (2008). Attentional costs in multiple-object tracking. Cognition, 108(1), 1-25.
  • Sohn, W. Y. & Seiffert, A. E. (2006). Motion aftereffects specific to surface depth order: Beyond binocular disparity. Journal of Vision, 6(2), 119-131.

Honors

2009   Jefferey Nordhaus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching awarded by Vanderbilt University