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  Teacher Perceptions of Parent Efficacy for Helping Children Suceed in School

Teacher Perceptions of Parent Efficacy for Helping Children Succeed in School
Last updated: May, 2005

This scale was adapted from Hoover-Dempsey, Bassler and Brissie (1992) and is reported in Hoover-Dempsey, Walker, Jones and Reed (2002). It assesses teacher perceptions of parent efficacy for helping children succeed in school.

The measure employs a six-point, Likert-type scale: 1=disagree very strongly, 2=disagree, 3=disagree just a little, 4=agree just a little, 5=agree, 6=agree very strongly

Alpha reliability for the scale as reported in Hoover-Dempsey et al. (2002): .80 (pre-test); .69 (post-test).

Participants were asked to respond to the following prompt:
“In this section, please indicate HOW MUCH YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE with each of the statements.”  
 
1.
My students’ parents help their children learn.
2.
My students’ parents have little influence on their children’s motivation to do well in school.
3.
If my students’ parents try really hard, they can help their children learn even when the children are unmotivated.
4.
My students’ parents feel successful about helping their children learn.
5.
My students’ parents don’t know how to help their children make educational progress.
6.
My students’ parents help their children with school work at home.
7.
My students’ parents make a significant, positive educational difference in their children’s lives.

References:

Hoover-Dempsey, K.V., Bassler, O.C., & Brissie, J.S. (1992). Parent efficacy, teacher efficacy, and parent involvement: Explorations in parent-school relations. Journal of Educational Research, 85, 287-294.

Hoover-Dempsey, K.V., Walker, J.M.T., Jones, K.P., & Reed, R.P. (2002). Teachers Involving Parents (TIP): An in-service teacher education program for enhancing parental involvement. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18 (7), 843-467.  



  


  







The Family-School Partnership Lab is part of the Psychology and Human Development Department, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University.