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Tri Deltas Mark 40 Years of Supporting Children

Spring 2011The Greater Good  |  Share This  |  E-mail  |  Print  | 
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Six-year-old cancer patient Alex Kallas checks out the playroom at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. The cure rate for childhood cancers has more than doubled in the past 20 years.

Six-year-old cancer patient Alex Kallas checks out the playroom at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. The cure rate for childhood cancers has more than doubled in the past 20 years, from approximately 30 percent to about 75 percent.

The longest-running fundraising event for the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt is the Eve of Janus, which celebrated its 40th year last summer. Through the years this Nashville tradition has raised more than $3 million for the Tri Delta Pediatric Hematology Oncology Clinic. Funds from the annual Eve of Janus Ball go directly to support research, education and patient care.

Three energetic Nashville Tri Delta alumnae—Patsy White Bradshaw, BA’63; Mary Ann Braden Chaffin, BA’61; and Sandra Murray Polk, BA’63—launched the event in 1970. In large part because of the Nashville chapter’s efforts to raise funds to support pediatric cancer research, the Delta Delta Delta national fraternity adopted childhood cancer as its philanthropic project nationwide.

To ensure that the Tri Delta legacy endures, the Tri Delta Pediatric Cancer Endowed Research Fund was established in March at the School of Medicine. The fund celebrates the organization’s 40 years of support for Children’s Hospital and the Pediatric Hematology Oncology program.

The Tri Delta Pediatric Hematology Oncology Clinic of Children’s Hospital is a highly specialized medical facility offering comprehensive treatment to children with cancer and blood diseases. The emphasis is on family-centered, exceptional patient care and on “translational research,” where innovative therapies are rapidly brought to the bedside.

One in every 330 Americans develops cancer before the age of 20. Although cure rates are up, the incidence of cancer continues to rise in all ages and in all racial and ethnic subgroups—especially among adolescents.

For more information please call the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt development office at (615) 322-7450, or visit www.eveofjanus.com.

 

© 2014 Vanderbilt University | Photography: Anne Rayner

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