Vanderbilt Magazine

Vanderbilt Magazine

The Week That Lasts a Lifetime

A professor’s challenge to students sparked a revolution in volunteerism.

by GayNelle Doll

Cover FeatureSpring 2011  |  Share This  |  E-mail  |  Print  | 
(4 votes)

Kristen Keely-Dinger, BS’98, remembers March snow falling on the streets of New York, the sounds of babies crying and people screaming, and the stench of urine in the housing projects as she carried hot meals up flight after flight of stairs.

As a Vanderbilt sophomore who had signed up for Alternative Spring Break, she was spending the week with a group that delivered meals to people who were homebound and living with HIV/AIDS.

Volunteering with children at Andros Christian Academy on Andros Island in the Bahamas gives Vanderbilt students an understanding of the area’s social and economic challenges.

Volunteering with children at Andros Christian Academy on Andros Island in the Bahamas gives Vanderbilt students an understanding of the area’s social and economic challenges.

“I remember the touch of a very sick man’s hand as he took the meal from me,” Keely-Dinger says now, some 15 years later. “I remember the smile of a man who lived on the sixth floor of his building with no elevator, and was so frail he could barely get out of his chair. He invited us in for a chat and told us that often the volunteers who delivered his meals were the only people he would talk to each day.

“I remember looking up as we came out of one of the dilapidated buildings and seeing the snow falling to the ground and covering the dirt and grime of the city. Watching that snow felt symbolic to me of hope and of rebirth.

“Those unintentional touches and conversations had a deep and life-altering impact on me, which eventually led to altering my undergraduate study,” adds Keely-Dinger, who after graduation signed up to serve in an AmeriCorps program through the National AIDS Fund. She went on to earn a master’s degree in social work and now works in the field of philanthropy, as vice president of programs and grants for Nashville-based Baptist Healing Trust, which works to foster access to health care for vulnerable populations.

Multiply Kristen Keely-Dinger’s experience by 25 years and hundreds of students, and you get an appreciation for the significance of Alternative Spring Break. Vanderbilt’s ASB program is regarded as the largest and oldest student-run travel program of its kind in the country, and it has been widely emulated on other college campuses. This year 440 Vanderbilt students took part in service trips to 37 sites—most in the U.S. but also in the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic and Toronto, Canada.

Students in Washington, D.C., spend a week with the city’s homeless population, volunteering at the largest homeless shelter in the United States and spending 48 hours “living” on the streets. With them are representatives from Urban Plunge and National Coalition for the Homeless.

Students in Washington, D.C., spend a week with the city’s homeless population, volunteering at the largest homeless shelter in the United States and spending 48 hours “living” on the streets. With them are representatives from Urban Plunge and National Coalition for the Homeless.

Mark Dalhouse, director of the Office of Active Citizenship and Service at Vanderbilt, estimates that during its 25 years, Alternative Spring Break has involved nearly 7,000 student participants. Vanderbilt’s program has expanded in recent years to include Alternative Summer Break, Alternative Winter Break, and a newly created Alternative Thanksgiving Break. This year also marked the beginning of opportunities for Vanderbilt alumni to take part by providing service or hospitality in several cities across the country.

“ASB provides a dose of reality for many undergraduate students by allowing them to become educated—on topics ranging from homelessness to HIV/AIDS to wildlife conservation—prior to spring break, and then spend a week immersed in that issue,” says Dr. Ben Ludwig, BA’02, who is completing his residency at Boston University Medical Center.

“Students are forced to confront reality and address their own misconceptions, and by working on-site, they gain a much greater understanding of the issue at hand,” adds Ludwig. He first participated in ASB during his sophomore year, then served as a site leader his junior year, and was co-director of ASB his senior year.

Top: preparing meals in Los Angeles for individuals who are homebound because of disease. Center: a light moment while making a garden in Nashville. Bottom: volunteering at ¡CityArts! in Providence, R.I.

Top: preparing meals in Los Angeles for individuals who are homebound because of disease. Center: a light moment while making a garden in Nashville. Bottom: volunteering at ¡CityArts! in Providence, R.I.

Vanderbilt’s Alternative Spring Break roots go back to 1986, when Susan Ford Wiltshire, a longtime classics professor at the university, challenged students in the Omicron Delta Kappa honor society to organize a week of service as an alternative to the time-honored spring break bacchanal. As Professor of History Marshall Eakin relates the sequence of events in a brief history he compiled five years ago about ASB at Vanderbilt, a small group of students took up Wiltshire’s challenge, led by Ethel Johnson Harris, BS’87, with assistance from Kathy Gray, BS’88; Claudia Deane, BA’88; and Courtney Reynolds White, BE’87.

The first spring break trip took place in March 1987. Seventy-five students applied to work at one of four sites: “with Cambodian refugee families in Nashville, at Roses Creek in East Tennessee, at a Sioux Indian reservation in Dupree, S.D., and in Juarez, Mexico,” according to Eakin. “The office of Chancellor Joe B. Wyatt provided one-third of the total funding of $13,000, the student projects fund came up with $2,000, and the participants contributed $6,500 (or half) the budget.”

“Chancellor Wyatt really believed in student empowerment and supported those of us who were involved in service efforts every way that he could,” says Laura Mann Magevney, BA’91, JD’97, MDiv’98, who with her husband, Michael, served as an ASB co-director and later as co-founder of Break Away (see sidebar, right). “We had great support and professors like Marshall Eakin helping to advise us—but without taking over. It really was student-led, and that helped the program grow.”

Heavy Lifting and Lifelong Learning

By 1989, ASB had blossomed into a formal organization with student co-chairs, a student executive committee, and a slogan: “The toughest spring break you’ll ever love.” From its early days, the organizers seemed to have been clear-eyed about how much could be accomplished by a loose coalition of college students, and how to maximize the experience.

“There’s a clear acknowledgement that as a participant, you’re probably going to gain more than you give,” says Michael Magevney, BA’91, MBA’98. “But that spirit really helps students blossom and grow into lifelong learners.”

“Obviously, in a week, we didn’t rebuild an entire community or change inner-city schools,” says Sarah Latterner, BS’98, who has worked in areas of public management and social policy since graduation, and is now with United Way Worldwide. As a sophomore she was part of an ASB group that worked on construction projects with a Native American community in Oklahoma, and as a senior she co-led a group that worked with inner-city Detroit youth. “They were totally different projects, but both were substantial—and the relationships we created, the conversations we had, and the experience for all involved had an awesome impact.”

Top: taking a break while removing invasive plant species in Grand Canyon  National Park. Center: painting at the Rice Child and Family Center outside Chicago. Bottom: removing invasive species on California’s central Pacific coast.

Top: taking a break while removing invasive plant species in Grand Canyon National Park. Center: painting at the Rice Child and Family Center outside Chicago. Bottom: removing invasive species on California’s central Pacific coast.

Laura Pierce, a current Vanderbilt junior, hasn’t yet settled on a career but is exploring options that involve international work or health-care administration. She has participated in Alternative Spring Break the past two years—last year doing manual labor removing invasive species and collecting seed in the Grand Canyon, and this year volunteering for a day care and working with Habitat for Humanity in Immokalee, Fla.

“In the Grand Canyon we could visibly see the grounds we had cleared,” she says. “It takes years to remove an invasive species due to seeds left in the ground, and the rangers we worked with commented that the part of the Canyon we were camping in had seen a drastic change because of service groups like ours.”

“I think many people are skeptical about the impact that 12 Vanderbilt students can have while volunteering during spring break,” says Ludwig. “At the end of the week, there are definitely tangible accomplishments. But it is often the act of doing that makes ASB so valuable—sharing conversation at a shelter for victims of domestic violence, sharing a meal with a resident in a shelter, or working on a science project with a child—and that can have the most profound impact on another individual’s life.”

Vanderbilt’s Alternative Spring Break program is headed by a student executive board, with 12 students appointed in pairs to the positions of co-chair, education, placements, public relations, site and service development, and treasurer. Many have previous ASB experience under their belts before going on the board or serving as site leaders.

Students interested in signing up for ASB submit an application and undergo an interview with board members and site directors. A maximum of 12 participants is placed at each site. Students also may apply for financial aid to help meet the costs of the trip, which vary according to site.

It’s not just the week of the trip itself, but the training and discussions before and after that help give ASB its impact. “Before and during the ASB trip, students are educated about the issues they are trying to address as well as reflect upon what they did, what they saw, and how they felt about it,” says Keely-Dinger, who was a site leader during her third year of Alternative Spring Break involvement. “This process of education, action and reflection helps to create the opportunity for personal growth and change.”

ASB alumni agree that another valuable aspect of the experience is the way it cuts across campus boundaries of school and major, Greek and independent. Organizers work hard at making the service groups of about a dozen people as diverse as possible.

Laura Pierce didn’t know any of the other students in her group before signing up this year. “Everyone on my site had such a unique range of interests, from writing poetry to playing basketball, participating in Greek life or juggling or playing the violin. Despite different interests, we all shared the desire to learn, to meet new people, and to make the most of our break.”

Students spruce up the Southern Animal Rescue Association, a no-kill animal shelter in Seguin, Texas.

Students spruce up the Southern Animal Rescue Association, a no-kill animal shelter in Seguin, Texas.

“Initially, I knew only about five people participating in ASB. It was incredible to experience, and later as a site leader to witness, how close a group of random Vanderbilt students could become after being crammed into a Ford Econoline van and sharing an intense week of service,” says Ludwig, who as a physician is continuing to explore new service opportunities through medical training, especially in refugee health.

Dr. Chris Kyle, BS’99, participated in Alternative Spring Break all four years at Vanderbilt. “ASB really does cut across all groups on campus,” says Kyle, who is now a urologist in Eugene, Ore. “I made many lasting friendships with people I may not have met otherwise, and I keep in touch with many of them.”

The experience also builds bridges between students and faculty. Mark Bandas, dean of students and associate provost, notes that Vanderbilt’s recent emphasis on residential life has amplified opportunities for engagement and discussion around the issues students explore in their Alternative Spring Break experiences. “The fact that we’re a residential campus makes a big difference,” he says. “We have an unusually caring campus community.”

A Revelation and a Gift

Larry Dowdy, professor of computer science and professor of computer engineering, holds the undisputed Vanderbilt faculty title for having accompanied students on the most Alternative Spring Break trips: 19 so far. “In my normal life, I am just into my teaching, research and administration, and it’s easy as the years go by to become somewhat cynical about life,” Dowdy says. “Alternative Spring Break is a chance for me to spend a week with students who are committed to giving back, and that’s invigorating.

ASB attracts people from all over campus—all genders, ethnicities, classes, colleges and majors. Spending a week doing service with a group of 11 strangers allows us to learn how other people experience Vanderbilt.

—Callie Wade, Class of 2011 and 2011 co-chair of ASB

“You go into it thinking you are going to help people, but it’s really you who benefits,” Dowdy says. “It’s you who is changed.”

One year Dowdy accompanied a group that went to Union, W.Va., a town he had been familiar with since boyhood as the home of his grandparents. “[A]s a small boy I remember going there and having no indoor plumbing, only outhouses and bedside chamber pots to use in the middle of the night. We milked our own cows for milk and used our own chickens for stew. But I never viewed this area as being in poverty,” Dowdy wrote in an essay for last winter’s edition of Vanderbilt’s ASB newsletter.

“Realizing that one person’s ‘poverty’ is another person’s ‘home’ became a personal revelation and a personal gift. Since that experience, I dare not judge another by thinking that I might have even the slightest inkling of what is best for them.”

Shayan Ahmed, Class of 2012, volunteers in an after-school program  with children at Andros Christian Academy in the Bahamas.

Shayan Ahmed, Class of 2012, volunteers in an after-school program with children at Andros Christian Academy in the Bahamas.

Since graduating from Vanderbilt, Chris Kyle’s medical studies and career have taken him far and wide. While attending medical school at Louisiana State University, he also took night classes and completed a master’s degree in public health. As a medical student he participated in a volunteer medical trip to Zimbabwe, was president of a student-run homeless clinic, and helped form an international medical exchange program. During his medical residency in Miami, he took a volunteer medical trip to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and then did an oncology/robotic surgery fellowship in Melbourne, Australia, before settling in Oregon with his wife—fellow Vanderbilt ASB alumna Dr. Brooke Lambard Kyle, BS’96.

His first of four Alternative Spring Break trips was to Lima, Peru, and he remembers one of the site leaders discussing the difference between a do-gooder and an activist. “He said, ‘A do-gooder goes into a soup kitchen and asks, “Where’s the ladle? How can I help?” An activist walks into a soup kitchen and asks, “Why is this here? What are the conditions that have created the need for a soup kitchen in this community?”’”

The beauty of ASB rests in the fact that participants continue to grow and learn after their return to life as normal. My views regarding poverty and immigration are dramatically different now.

—Nehal Mehta, Owen Graduate School of Management first-year student and 2011 co-chair of ASB

Alternative Spring Break, Kyle adds, addresses both sides of that equation. “We are ‘do-gooders’ in that we are providing hundreds or even thousands of man-hours of service to a community. In and of itself, that’s admirable. What I value about ASB is that it’s structured to ask the deeper questions—like the activist.”

Donovan Miller, BA’98, now a tax manager at a public accounting firm in Dallas, was involved with Alternative Spring Break all four years. “I was what you would call a ‘lifer,’” says Miller. “After my first trip I never considered doing anything else” for spring break.

“It has been 13 years since I last served,” he adds, “and there are many times each year that I recall the experiences I had in ASB. It was amazing to see the outpouring of support from the communities in which we served. One of my fondest memories occurred on my last trip as a site leader for eastern Kentucky. Many in the group were first-time participants. As much as I had tried to explain what a powerful experience ASB could be, it was not until the end of the week that I could see just how much they understood what I had been trying to convey.”

“There is something to be said for taking people out of their environment,” agrees Laura Mann Magevney. “It’s easy to go around with blinders on and not really look around. ASB really takes students out of their comfort zones and teaches them about an area. And once those blinders are off, you begin to look at your own community in a different way.”

 

© 2014 Vanderbilt University | Photography: Laura and Michael Magevney by Taryn Hannah

Share Your VUpoint

Conversation guidelines: Vanderbilt Magazine welcomes your thoughts, stories and information related to this article. Please stay on topic and be respectful of others. Keep the conversation appropriate for interested readers across the map.






Luis says:

Wonderful description of international voluntourism opportunities, an area growing by plus 16% per year. Since 2005, we host 16 to 20 volunteer groups annually. Our programs are in the Peruvian Amazon Jungle.


Jill Piacitelli says:

Absolutely loved every word in this article. Thank you.


Billy Osteen (A&S '89) says:

The ASB Vanderbilt connections continue around the world!

I served as an ASB Site Leader while in grad school at UVA and carried the service-learning philosophy with me into teaching gigs in Alaska, Arizona, California, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Most recently, we’ve created a service-learning course at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand to connect students’ service with earthquake relief efforts.

Many thanks to Professor Wiltshire and Chancellor Wyatt for planting this seed – makes me very proud to be a Commodore!


Gillian Hayes says:

ASB was an incredibly meaningful experience for me as a student. Now that I am a professor, I love watching our students get the same experience, and I am so glad that ASB has spread beyond Vanderbilt to hosts of other institutions. Thank you for writing this article… it has really brightened my morning.




Laura Mann Magevney and Michael Magevney were Vanderbilt sophomores when they signed up for their first Alternative Spring Break in 1987. “It opened our eyes to a different economic reality that many of us had never been exposed to,” says Laura. (Photo by Taryn Hannah)



The Alternative Break Connection

Each spring, students at colleges and universities across the country spend their week of spring break performing community service at thousands of sites. The phenomenon has spread beyond spring at many institutions, where students immerse themselves in service work during other school breaks as well.

How do colleges go about setting up and running successful programs? For guidance, hundreds look to Break Away, a nonprofit organization that provides training and assistance. Break Away traces its roots to two energetic Vanderbilt students.

Laura Mann Magevney, BA’91, JD’97, MDiv’98, and Michael Magevney, BA’91, MBA’98, were both sophomores when they signed up for their first Alternative Spring Break in 1987.

“There had always been faith-based groups that would sponsor service trips,” Laura remembers. “But Vanderbilt was different in that it tied its efforts to education and was not linked to any faith-based initiative. And fairly early on, Vanderbilt’s became the largest” of the growing programs in spring break service trips.

Their junior year, Laura and Michael served as trip leaders for one of Vanderbilt’s four Alternative Spring Break sites, renovating an old schoolhouse for use as a community center. “The sites were incredibly different from each other,” Laura recalls. “You might be working with children on a Native American reservation, or you could be at a site in Appalachia cleaning up trash, or working on issues of hunger and homelessness in Washington, D.C.”

As seniors, Laura and Michael were co-directors of Vanderbilt’s Alternative Spring Break program. “It really was student-led,” Michael says, “and I think that helped the program grow. That pattern has helped a lot of students. Alternative Spring Break provided one of my greatest leadership opportunities at Vanderbilt, and I think for a lot of students.”

The two completed a guide to help future Vanderbilt ASB leaders, and William Aaron, BA’89, MBA’98, shared the guide with others at a conference sponsored by the Campus Outreach Opportunity League (COOL). At COOL’s request, Laura and Michael put together a more comprehensive guide, collaborating with Kelly Mullins, BA’90, and Aaron.

“Once that got out and into people’s hands, we started being asked to present at conferences, and we also started seeing that a lot of groups needed more help than just the book,” Laura says. “So Michael and I got dressed up and made an appointment to see Chancellor Joe B. Wyatt.”

Wyatt had been supportive of Alternative Spring Break since its beginning, and now he agreed to Laura and Michael’s proposal to fund a startup organization called Break Away. Within a few months’ time, they also had received grants from the Kellogg and Ford foundations, and Break Away was up and running, with the two serving as co-directors.

Eventually, after both Magevneys enrolled in graduate school, the reins of Break Away were handed over to a new director. Break Away’s office moved from Vanderbilt to Florida and later to Atlanta, where it now resides. Each year Break Away honors its founders’ contributions by granting a Michael Magevney and Laura Mann Program of the Year Award.

Laura and Michael married and now live in Jacksonville, Fla., with their four children. Laura is director of Christian formation for St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, and Michael is director of global implementation for Beeline.com, a workforce recruitment and planning company. Both are active volunteers in the Jacksonville area, and they are serving as class party chairs for their 20th Vanderbilt undergraduate reunion this fall.

It seems their children have inherited the service gene, too. “Yesterday our 9-year-old son came home,” Michael says, “and told us he and a friend had set up a lemonade stand and were sending $70 to Japan as their relief effort. It was their own thing that they had come up with. It was a beautiful day, and that’s how they spent their afternoon.”

Keep Reading

    None Found

Search