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Nurses Run Clinics for Metro Schools Employees

Summer 2009The Campus  |  Share This  |  E-mail  |  Print  | 
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Nurse Patti McCarver weighs Clayton Aaron Jenkins during an open house for Metro Nashville Public Schools’ new Employee and Family Health Centers, which are run by nurse practitioners from Vanderbilt School of Nursing.

Nurse Patti McCarver weighs Clayton Aaron Jenkins during an open house for Metro Nashville Public Schools’ new Employee and Family Health Centers, which are run by nurse practitioners from Vanderbilt School of Nursing.

Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) has opened five new Employee and Family Health Centers to provide prompt, quality care for everything from acute illness to chronic disease management.

The clinics, which opened in May, are the result of a new partnership with Insurance Trust and University Community Health Services (UCHS). Each site is run by board-certified family nurse practitioners from the Vanderbilt School of Nursing. The clinics provide convenient, quality health care for about 16,000 teachers, retired teachers, employees and their families.

“Our teachers and Metro employees provide great services to our city, and it is a privilege to manage these clinics for them,” says Patti McCarver, registered nurse and clinics manager for MNPS. The clinics are distinct yellow and gray portables, each equipped with four exam rooms to help patients with illnesses, injuries, women’s health care, annual physicals, sports physicals, immunizations, management of chronic illness, and health-risk assessments. Same-day appointments are available for acute illnesses.

In addition to at least one nurse practitioner at each site, the project includes a population health manager who works closely with program administrators, the school system and community health groups to help prevent secondary health issues. Clinics are located at MNPS headquarters and at four other locations around the city.

The clinics are expected to help cut down on the number of health care-related absences for employees and their dependents. No public monies are involved in the clinics, which are funded by the Teachers Health Plan.

 

© 2014 Vanderbilt University | Photography: JOE HOWELL

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dave garner says:

I made my first visit to the employees clinic. The process was very quick. I saw the nurse in matter of minutes.the treatment was very good.I was put off of work for three days.I was suppose to call back after the three days to be released to go back to work. I called back the answering service said the nurse was with a patient and she would leave her a message to call. I told that I really needed to talk to her. She said hold on,she comes back and then tells me the person I needed to talk to was off for the day. After numberous attempts and a day later.I finally got a response. My question is why can you not call the clinics direct. I know each clinic has a receptionist. people would be better served. I would like to say my first experience was pleasant by it was not.


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