Peabody Reflector

Honors and awards

Around the Mall, Fall 2009 | No Comment | |

Loss

Loss

Christopher Loss, assistant professor of public policy and education, has accepted an invitation to serve as a fellow for the Teagle Foundation’s new National Forum on the Future of the Liberal Arts. The forum is a three-year program designed to identify and prepare a core national group of emerging academic leaders to guide the future of the liberal arts. Loss specializes in 20th century American history with an emphasis on the social, political and policy history of American higher education. The Teagle Foundation is a philanthropic organization with a focus on engaging students in liberal arts education.

Saegert

Saegert

Susan Saegert, professor of human and organizational development, received the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Socioeconomic Status 2009 Award for Distinguished Leadership at the association’s annual conference in August. Stephen N. Elliott, professor of special education, received the Senior Scientist Award from Division 16 of the American Psychological Association at the conference.

Elliott

Elliott

Saegert is director of Peabody’s Center for Community Studies. Her research involves affordable housing, the mortgage crisis, how to improve distressed housing and neighborhoods, women and the environment, crowding, urban stress and the role of housing in health. Elliott, who holds the Dunn Family Chair in Educational and Psychological Assessment, is director of the Learning Sciences Institute and the interdisciplinary program in educational psychology.

David Lubinski, professor of psychology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center investigator, and Greg Park, Peabody graduate student, each won awards from the Mensa Educational Research Foundation. Lubinski won the Mensa Award for Research Excellence, Senior Investigator, for the 2006 psychological science paper, “Tracking exceptional human capital over two decades,” of which he was the lead author.

Park won the Mensa Award for Research Excellence, Junior Investigator, for the 2007 psychological science paper, “Contrasting intellectual patterns for creativity in the arts and sciences: Tracking intellectually precocious youth over 25 years,” of which he was the lead author.

The Mensa Educational Research Foundation gives out six awards for research excellence for a scientific article each year, three to senior investigators and three to junior investigators.

Dennis Davis was selected to receive a 2009 Adolescent Literacy Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Academy of Education. Davis is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Teaching and Learning, development learning and diversity program and a member of ExpERT.

photo credits: steve green, JENNY MANDEVILLE

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