Rigor and Relevance

Corporate Music Gets Bad Rap
Fall 2009Rigor and Relevance

Only starving artists and songwriters can produce great music, right? Not so, say Jennifer Lena, assistant professor of sociology, and Richard “Pete” Peterson, professor of sociology, emeritus. The American Sociological Review published their findings regarding the development of 20th century music genres in the United States. Their study of more than 60 types of music [...]

Read more »

Holy Ancient Comic Strip, Batman!
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

Telling stories in comic book or graphic novels isn’t new—ancient Romans had their own version in the Tabulae Iliacae—but what scholar David Petrain learns from them is. Petrain, assistant professor of classics, is studying the group of 22 carved stone plaques which date to the early Roman empire and tell the story of the Trojan [...]

Read more »

Shot Free?
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

Tiny carbon tubes are helping researchers find a way to free Type 1 diabetics from insulin shots. Using nanotechnology, Vanderbilt researchers have been able to continuously monitor the amount of insulin produced by transplanted cells. Type 1, or juvenile, diabetes can be treated by transplanting insulin-producing cells into a patient’s pancreas to replace nonfunctional cells. [...]

Read more »

Rogues Exposed
by Kara Furlong and David F. Salisbury | Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

Research by Assistant Professor of Astronomy Kelly Holley-Bockelmann indicates that there may be hundreds of nearly impossible-to-spot black holes careening around the galaxy. Because these rogue black holes can’t be directly observed, Holley-Bockelmann’s research simulates their behavior. She uses the supercomputer at Vanderbilt’s Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education (ACCRE) to run simulations to [...]

Read more »

Now You’re Talking
by Melanie Moran | Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

They say that talk is good for the soul. Turns out that it may be the best long-term solution for many cases of depression, as well. Ongoing research by Steve Hollon, professor of psychology, and Richard Shelton, MD, James G. Blakemore Research Professor of Psychiatry at Vanderbilt Medical Center, shows that cognitive behavioral therapy could [...]

Read more »

Up Teeny, Tiny Periscope
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

Who developed the world’s smallest periscope and why? It wasn’t Q for James Bond—a team of Vanderbilt scientists developed tiny mirrored, pyramid-shaped wells the width of a human hair to get high-resolution, 3-D views of cells and other microorganisms. “Not only can we see the tops of cells, we can view their sides as well—something [...]

Read more »

Islamic Traditions Rise From Death
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2009

To find the origins of many Muslim traditions, look to Islamic death and funeral rituals

Read more »

When War Comes Home
Fall 2008Rigor and Relevance

  Republican incumbents whose home districts saw heavy casualties in the Iraq War faced a harder re-election in the 2006 U.S. House elections than Democrats. According to a study by Bruce Oppenheimer, professor of political science, and Christian Grose, assistant professor of political science, for every two Iraq war deaths from Republican-controlled districts, there was [...]

Read more »

Moving Always Takes Longer Than Expected
Fall 2008Rigor and Relevance

How long did it take for the Americas to be populated with people? The theory has been that ancient settlers would have moved quickly down the west coast from Siberia, drawing resources from the ocean. Findings from a team headed by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Tom Dillehay and reported in Science back that theory, but [...]

Read more »

They May Be Small, But They Deliver
by David Salisbury | Fall 2008Rigor and Relevance
Forget the Mini Cooper.

The biggest small thing in transportation is Assistant Professor of Chemistry Eva Harth’s creation of a new drug delivery system using nanoparticles. Teeny, tiny nanoparticles—molecules so small that about 90,000 of them total the width of a human hair—have unusual properties, structure and applications that have great promise for innovation in science and medicine. Harth’s [...]

Read more »