Rigor and Relevance

Briefs
Fall 2010Rigor and Relevance

Rescuing History Crumbling with age, attacked by insects and at risk from climate and other damage, historic records of Africans in the Americas were at risk of being lost entirely. Professor of History Jane Landers and a team of international scholars set out to digitally preserve the oldest black and Indian records in the hemisphere. [...]

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Spare the Rod and Signal Your Politics
Fall 2010Rigor and Relevance

Watch the next time you are in Target and a child throws a tantrum nearby. The way the parents respond could tell you if they are conservative or liberal. Research by Professor of Political Science Marc Hetherington indicates some people signal their political preferences through their actions, whether or not they mean to—from spanking a [...]

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Heaviest in the World
Fall 2010Rigor and Relevance

If you haven’t looked at a periodic table of the elements since high school chemistry class, you might be surprised to learn that it has changed quite a bit. The discovery of new superheavy elements in the last few years means there are additions to the chart. One of those new elements, no. 117, was [...]

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Briefs
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2010

Biblical Epic Eight Years In The Making Daniel M. Patte isn’t directing a remake of The Ten Commandments, but his new book, The Cambridge Dictionary of Christianity, is an equally huge undertaking. Patte, professor of religious studies, has spent eight years soliciting and compiling 3,500 entries documenting the beliefs and practices of Christians throughout history. [...]

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That Alcohol Is Going On Your Permanent Record
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2010

In grade school students are often told that acts could “go on their permanent record”—a mythical file that impacts everything from college admissions to job searches. Today, College of Arts and Science researchers seek to discover if there’s a true kind of permanent record that resides in a person’s white blood cells. John McLean, assistant [...]

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Dangerous Discourse
Rigor and RelevanceSpring 2010

You’re wrong. You’re stupid. And your mother dresses you funny. In his new book, Democracy and Moral Conflict, Robert Talisse, associate professor of philosophy and political science, argues that our nation’s current polarized state is actually a threat to democracy. The book examines the political debate in America today and the lack of civility that sides [...]

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Don’t Handle With Care
Fall 2009Rigor and Relevance

In a world where some items—SUVs, houses, the size of the national debt—seem to be growing at an alarming pace, Arts and Science physicists have their eyes trained on particles so tiny they make atoms look elephantine. Nanotechnology is the study of these tiny particles—specifically those that meas-ure 100 nanometers. (Before you ask, a nanometer [...]

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Nothing to Sneeze At
Fall 2009Rigor and Relevance

It starts with a tickle in your nose. Maybe a little discomfort at the back of the throat. You try to imagine it’s not there. You hold it in as long as you can and then…ACHOO! Yep, you have a cold. But what kind of cold? The symptoms for colds—or respiratory infections—caused by bacteria are [...]

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Making Mosquitoes Buzz Off
Fall 2009Rigor and Relevance

Next time you’re bothered by mosquitoes, try giving them the cold shoulder—literally. Senior Research Associate Guirong Wang will test his theory that mosquitoes are attracted by humans’ warmblooded heat with the help of a $100,000 Grand Challenges Exploration grant awarded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Wang is working to find molecules that interfere [...]

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(Ful)Bright Ideas
Fall 2009Rigor and Relevance

Marshall Eakin, professor of history, will use his recently won Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship to study the formation of Brazilian national identity in the 20th century. “I am looking at Brazilian national identity to see how it is that the peoples of Brazil come to identify with a common set of symbols that are [...]

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