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OUT in Front Conference Schedule

February 8th, 2014 * Vanderbilt Student Life Center

OUT in Front 2014 Digital Program

 

Schedule at a Glance

Time Event Location
8:00-9:00am Check In & Breakfast Board of Trust Room
9:00-9:30am Welcome/Safe Space Board of Trust Room
9:30-10:30am Session 1  

Ballrooms A, B, C

Meeting Rooms 1,2,3

Board of Trust Room

10:40-11:40am Session 2  

Ballrooms A, B, C

Meeting Rooms 1,2,3

Board of Trust Room

11:50-12:40pm Lunch Board of Trust Room
12:45-1:45pm Session 3  

Ballrooms A, B, C

Meeting Rooms 1,2,3

Board of Trust Room

ISSS Conference Room

1:55-2:55pm Session 4  

Meeting Rooms 1,2,3

Board of Trust Room

K. C. Potter Center

ISSS Conference Room

3:05-4:05pm Keynote by Christy Halbert 

Board of Trust Room
4:15-5:00pm Action Plan/Closing Board of Trust Room

HIV Testing by Nashville Cares
1pm-5pm ISSS Conference Room
Nashville Cares is offering free and confidential HIV testing during OUT In Front.
Nashville CARES promotes and participates in a comprehensive and compassionate response to HIV/AIDS in Middle Tennessee. Their purpose is to educate the community for increased understanding and prevention of HIV transmission, to advocate for responsible public policy, and to provide services that improve the quality of life for people with HIV/AIDS and their families.

The workshops offered at Out In Front this year cover a wide range of topics, but they all relate back to our theme of VOICE. In order to further clarify the purpose of these workshops, each workshop has the tenets of the theme denoted next to the title by letters. The letters represent the tenets of the theme as follows:

VOICE: The Power of the Collective Narrative

V – Vocalize – Communicating and marketing the vision/identity of an organization or goal.
O – Organize - Building communities/membership, clarifying goals, or utilizing networks.
I – Include - Inclusion of various identities/movements/histories and building safe, welcoming spaces.
C – Create - Developing programs, enhancing creative skills and outlets, or building the foundations of new ventures.
E – Engage - Enhancing involvement, increasing motivation, and fostering community engagement.


Session 1 (9:30-10:30am)

State of Equality & Inclusion in the Nashville Business Climate
Lisa Howe, Nashville LGBT Chamber of Commerce Ballroom A
I will address the overall business climate in greater Nashville, speak about the impact that the NLGBTCC has had on local businesses and organizations and inform the audience how to be prepared to advance equality and inclusion as they enter the workplace. (E)

Beyond the Apps and Abs; Creating Inclusive Communities for Gay and Bi Men
Dean Baeles and Chris Purcell, Vanderbilt University Ballroom B
I grew up feeling gay, but I didn’t feel the type of gay I saw on TV.” Media reinforces what gay/bi men should, and should not look like. Most often, privileged identities within gay/bi communities (white, muscular, masculine, upper class) become the focus, leaving out a large portion of gay/bi men. This has direct influence on how gay/bi see themselves and their community. We’€™ve all experienced times when we felt our community is too shallow and not inclusive. But we have the power to shape what our community can and should look like. In this session, we will facilitate a solutions oriented conversation as to what community is, how it’s been shaped, and how we can work to create a more inclusive and supportive community moving forward. (I, C, E)

Where To Go When You Have To Go
Alethia England, Vanderbilt University Ballroom C
This workshop will focus on approaches for making gender neutral restrooms a reality on a college campus. Participants will discuss the reasons to want gender-neutral restrooms, see one way that the presenter took on mapping and creating gender-neutral bathrooms, and conclude with a discussion in small groups about the current state of potty affairs on their campuses, and address possible challenges that they might face. (O, I, C)

Queering the South: A Critical Exploration of Southern Identity
Kaylen Addison, Vanderbilt University Meeting Room 1
This presentation will explore how living in or being from the South can be an identity category that affects personal and political development alongside race, gender, sexuality, and other identities. The popular image of Southerners includes several labels and stereotypes that can be oppressive to Southerners who do not fit the mold. At the same time, many Southerners are resisting this image and creating their own space in the South and their own “Southernness€.” This presentation will help identify the ways that Southern identity can be examined and used along with other identities to create richer intersectionalities in personal development and social activism. (I, E)

Building Community: Why It’s Important and How You Can Do It
Scott Kelly and Josh Norman, Nashville GLBT Gaymers and Friends Meeting Room 2
This interactive session will provide an overview of GLBT communities through the lens of Multiple Identity Theory and equip participants with tools to create their own interest-based community group through an engaging kickstart process. (O, E)

How To Create Cultural Climate Change in Your Community
Students of Stonewall, Just Us Program Meeting Room 3
This interactive and experiential workshop will provide participants the opportunity to take a walking tour of the eight core tenants of creating climate change for LGBT youth within their community. A team of high school student leaders along with their college mentors will introduce participants to the work that they have been doing within the greater Nashville community. They will provide insight on how to effectively engage community partners as well as provide examples of collaborations that have produced positive outcomes. (V, O, E)

Identity Caucuses:
The intention of identity caucuses is to provide a space for individuals who share a particular identity in which they can discuss needs, challenges, or successes related to their shared identity. We respectfully request that identity caucuses be reserved strictly for those who share the given identity, not allies, friends, significant others, or interested student leaders.

Trans/Genderqueer/Gender-Nonconforming Caucus Facilitator Jody Cofer Randall Board of Trust Room

QPOC  (Queer People of Color) Caucus Facilitated by: Asher Kolieboi and Chloe Campbell Board of Trust Room

Organizing and Messaging for Trans Rights
Marisa Richmond, Tennessee Transgender Political Coalition Ballroom A
Fighting for Transgender equality has proven to be a challenge for those who have never been active in politics or have not worked to educate others about the lives of trans people. Many times, the “T”€ is often overlooked or shortchanged when discussing equal rights. Attendees will discuss the challenges of discussing trans identities and effective ways of messaging. (O, I, E)

Exclusive Inclusiveness: Avoiding Harm while Doing Good
Carolyn Crenshaw, Appalachian State University Ballroom B
The organization I help run, LIPS: Expressions of Female Sexuality, calls for female-identified individuals as an attempt to maintain a sacred, safe place for marginalized women. This is a unique space. It is an important space, especially for the women on App’€™s campus. However, this relies on and reinforces the gender binary, which can be alienating, exclusive, confusing and at times abusive to those transgender, gender non-conforming, and intersex individuals (TGNCI). LIPS is supposed to be an inclusive, safe space but how can we claim such a thing if there are other marginalized groups that feel explicitly excluded by us? How do we discuss as a group without placing on it a binarial lens? How can I be a leader to intersectional groups when I am a heavily privileged individual? How do I reach those who may be interested without tokenizing, or disappointing? I will lead a workshop on how organizations and leaders like LIPS can adjust themselves to work in tandem with TGNCI individuals and organizations to break down archaic, harmful societal views of sexuality and gender. (V, O, I)

Everyday Leadership: Create “Lollipop Moments”
Wil De Los Santos and Brandie VanOrder, Vanderbilt University Office of Leadership Ballroom C
Are you completely comfortable calling yourself a leader? According to Drew Dudley, we’ve made leadership into something beyond us. We act like the title “leader” is something we will one day deserve, but to claim the title now means a level of arrogance. In doing this, we have started to devalue the things that we can do every day, the moments when we can truly be a leader. EVERYONE has the ability to be a leader and demonstrate leadership! In this workshop we will learn about and discuss leadership strengths, talk about the role of everyday leadership in student organizations, and develop a personal action plan for creating “lollipop moments” and demonstrating everyday leadership. (E)

Never Normative: Navigating Layers of Selfhood in the LGBTQI Community and Beyond
Chloe Campbell
Meeting Room 1
In the words of Audre Lorde, “I am defined as other in every group I’m part of. The outsider, both strength and weakness. Yet without community there is certainly no liberation, no future, only the most vulnerable and temporary armistice between me and my oppression.”

The color of my skin provides an irremovable filter through which I experience the world and how much value people assume I have to give it. This is compounded by my gender identity.  In addition to this is my sexual orientation. Navigating these communities that do not often interact with one another brings me up against many roadblocks.  People outside of these identities may see them as static and independent versus dynamic interplaying factors that shape the individual’s experience. I can never silo who I am; I will never be just a Black person; never just a woman; never just a lesbian. How can I continue to advocate for myself as an individual and not internalize being the “other” that society labels me? How can I move beyond the frustrations of intersectionality and be proactive against these frustrations instead of reactive? In what ways can I build community that spans all aspects of my identity and empower myself and others? (V, O, I, E)

Polyamory and Non-Monogamy: the Good, the Bad, and the Sexy
Alba Onofrio, Vanderbilt Divinity School Meeting Room 2
Including people who identify as poly or non-monogamous in the LGBTQIA Movement is important, yet we don’t talk about it nearly enough. As more and more LGBTQIA people find themselves in non-traditional relationships or having experiences non-monogamy, it is critical that we have some basic terms and framework for understanding responsible non-monogamy as well as some of its challenges and benefits. (I)

Introduction to Queer Representation in Super Hero Comic Book Genre
Justin Hosford and Scott Kelly, Nashville GLBT Gaymers and Friends Meeting Room 3
This is a great 101 session where we will be tracing the history of queer representation, misrepresentation, and no representation in the last 60 years of comics. We will focus on the major themes of HIV/AIDS, censorship, gender identity, use of metaphor and allegory. (V)

Identity Caucuses:
The intention of identity caucuses is to provide a space for individuals who share a particular identity in which they can discuss needs, challenges, or successes related to their shared identity. We respectfully request that identity caucuses be reserved strictly for those who share the given identity, not allies, friends, significant others, or interested student leaders.

Interfaith Caucus Facilitated by Caroline Leithner and Alex Salfer-Hobbs Board of Trust Room

Asexuality Caucus Facilitated by Colleen McHugh Board of Trust Room

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Session 3 (12:45-1:45pm)

Queerability: The Intersection of Disability and LGBTQ
Kristen Guin, Queerability Ballroom A
In this workshop, attendees will learn more about the intersectionality and parallels of disability and LGBTQ as well as how to support LGBTQ people with disabilities. Topics will delve into the similar histories of the disability rights movement and the LGBTQ rights movement and will discuss strategies to accommodate LGBTQ people with disabilities. (I, E)

Trans* in the Media: Speaking for Ourselves and Being Spoken For
Jackson Crossley, Vanderbilt University Ballroom B
This workshop will take a deeper look into the different representations of trans* people in many different types of media, including television interviews, movies, documentaries, social media, television shows, magazines, etc. The presenter will cover the differences between trans* people representing themselves in the public sphere versus being misrepresented and/or represented by others. Historically trans* people have been portrayed negatively or not at all, but recently there have been some major breakthroughs in trans* representation. In this workshop we will discover what roles trans* people have played in these breakthroughs and how they can continue. (V, I)

Witness: Queering the Good Book and the Power of Queer Testimony
Alba Onofrio and Sarah Porter, Vanderbilt Divinity School Ballroom C
Religions are stories we tell ourselves to make sense of the world. They are metastructures that order everything from the smallest social cues to global economies. In this workshop, we will analyze some of the hurtful ramifications of Christian stories around sexuality; then we will create our own counter-narratives (storytelling as healing). Finally, we will discuss the power of telling our stories as an important component of social action (storytelling as strategy). While the workshop facilitators are most familiar with Christianity, people of other faiths or no faith are welcome to actively participate as well. (V, I, C)

Can You Hear Me Now: Language, Rhetorical Translation, and Navigating Political Discussion
Ames Sanders, Vanderbilt University Meeting Room 1
A workshop centered around the simple yet somewhat radical idea that communication—especially that surrounding issues of identity and politics—is a constant work of translation, negotiation, and invention. Language by its very nature evolves and changes rapidly, taking on new meanings based on context and population (among other things) but we often adhere to very prescriptive and ideologically-biased notions of what words, terms, and identity labels mean. This frustrates even basic conversations within and around our communities. I would lead discussions and activities causing participants to confront this fact and hopefully learn some tools by which they can take a more active and responsible role in their own rhetorical lives. In activism, rhetoric is a battlefield, a laboratory, and a home in which we root some of our deepest notions of self. Recognizing and navigating the fundamentally unique ways we all use it is vital to organization and empowerment. (V, I, E)

Personal and Organizational Branding
Steven Romeo, The Change Project Meeting Room 2
This workshop will explore branding in two ways, personal and organizational. Branding the the visual appeal that draws people in. Having an effective plan, along with some awesome graphics, you and your organization can communicate better. In addition, we will explore personal branding, and what a great business card, hashtags, and media campaigns looks like. (V)

How to Effectively Turnout
Elise Gibbons and Elisabeth Bradner, Planned Parenthood of Middle and East Tennessee Meeting Room 3
Presented by Planned Parenthood of Middle and East Tennessee, this workshop will empower organizers to enhance their organization’s turnout rates at meetings and events. Attendees will learn to increase member engagement members using basic grassroots organizing tactics. By learning these skills, LGBTQI organizers can feel more confident in fostering engagement on their campuses in in their communities. (O, E)

Identity Caucus: The intention of identity caucuses is to provide a space for individuals who share a particular identity in which they can discuss needs, challenges, or successes related to their shared identity. We respectfully request that identity caucuses be reserved strictly for those who share the given identity, not allies, friends, significant others, or interested student leaders.

Bi/Pan/Queer/Fluid – Facilitated by Petey Peterson: Board of Trust Room

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Session 4 (1:55-2:55pm)

Queering Sex Ed
Kait Spear and Maddie Gootman, Vandy Sex Ed Board of Trust Room
“Queering Sex Ed” is a workshop specifically addressed to the LGBTQIA community that seeks to provide a safe space for open discussions about holistic sexuality. Vandy Sex Ed arms peers with the knowledge and tools necessary to help themselves and each other make healthy and informed decisions around sex and sexuality. We want to empower the community to embrace their own choices and affirm the choices of others and to become advocates for their sexuality in a healthy, positive way. (V, I, E)

Creating Systemic Change – Community Mobilization and Activism
Robbie Maris, OutCentral Meeting Room 1
What does systemic change realistically look like for a young person living in a postmodern world yet in the South? Participants will look at effectively advancing the LGBT movement within various levels of organizing. Taking an inward look at our own humanity, activism and community mobilization are made that much easier. Our own humanity and passion is inspiration not only to ourselves but also to like-minded peers and those around us who we wish to influence and engage. Systemic change takes work, time, organizing, activism, creativity, and perhaps in some instances rainbows and glitter. Come share and discover ways to create change in palpable, realistic, and attainable ways. (O, E)

Bi Visibility: Looking at Your LGBTQ Organization Through the B Lens
Melinda Brown, Vanderbilt University Meeting Room 2
Does your LGBTQ organization include bisexuals as more than just a “B” in its title? This workshop will look at ways to do outreach to bisexuals, encourage bi participation and think about bi programming. We’ll also take a look at resources your organization can tap into that will help support bisexual inclusion. Participants will have the opportunity to share what has and has not worked for their organizations. (I)

Beyond the Small & Silver Screens: Creating Counter-Narratives for Queer Women Megan van der Toorn, Vanderbilt University Meeting Room 3
Despite exponential growth in the way queer women have been portrayed on television and in film, there is still much progress to be made in order to move beyond stereotypes and reflect the complexities of queer women’s lives. By examining the progression of queer women’s characters from the implementation of the Hays Code until now (paying particular focus to the past two decades of content) and engaging in discussions of the importance of representation, this workshop seeks to empower queer women by moving beyond the narratives that have been prescribed to us and embracing the counter-narratives we live every day. (V, I, C)

Caucus: Tennessee Statewide Conference Discussion Facilitated by Petey Peterson KC Potter Center/Office of LGBTQI Life

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HIV Testing by Nashville Cares
1pm-5pm ISSS Conference Room
Nashville Cares is offering free and confidential HIV testing during OUT In Front.
Nashville CARES promotes and participates in a comprehensive and compassionate response to HIV/AIDS in Middle Tennessee. Their purpose is to educate the community for increased understanding and prevention of HIV transmission, to advocate for responsible public policy, and to provide services that improve the quality of life for people with HIV/AIDS and their families.

 

Tracks

This year, Out In Front has provided several “tracks” of suggested workshops for attendees depending on their interests and needs. These tracks are NOT required, but are merely a guideline for any attendees who would like help choosing their workshops for the day. We wholeheartedly endorse using the tracks as you wish, mixing or combining tracks, or completely ignoring the tracks altogether if you’d like.

Ally Session 1: Where To Go When You Have To Go OR Students of Stonewall Session 2: Exclusive Inclusvieness OR Organizing and Messaging for Trans Rights Session 3: Trans* in the Media OR Queerability Session 4: Queering Sex Ed OR Bi Visibility

First Time Conference Attendee Session 1: Building Community OR Queering the South Session 2: Everyday Leadership OR Organizing and Messaging for Trans Rights Session 3: How to Effectively Turnout OR Can You Hear Me Now Session 4: Creating Systemic Change OR Queering Sex Ed

Returning Conference Attendee Session 1: Students of Stonewall Presentation OR Nashville Business Climate Session 2: Exclusive Inclusiveness OR Polyamory Session 3: Queerability OR Can You Hear Me Now Session 4: Creating Systemic Change OR Bi Visibility

Intersectionality Session 1: Queering the South OR Beyond the Apps & Abs Session 2: Organizing and Messaging for Trans Rights OR Polyamory OR Exclusive Inclusiveness Session 3: Queerability OR Trans* in the Media OR Witness Session 4: Bi Visibility OR Beyond the Small and Silver Screens

Media & Communications Session 1: Beyond the Apps & Abs OR Nashville Business Climate Session 2: Organizing and Messaging for Trans Rights OR Queer Comics Session 3: Trans* in the Media OR Personal and Organizational Branding OR Can You Hear Me Now Session 4: Beyond the Small and Silver Screens OR Creating Systemic Change

Student Organization Builders Session 1: Building Community OR Queering the South Session 2: Exclusive Inclusiveness OR Everyday Leadership Session 3: How to Effectively Turnout OR Personal and Organizational Branding Session 4: Creating Systemic Change OR Bi Visibility

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