Home » Notes » 220 Years Later and the Commonwealth Is Still Imposing Laws on the United States: A Comparative Look at U.S. Antibribery Legislation and the United Kingdom’s Bribery Act 2010

220 Years Later and the Commonwealth Is Still Imposing Laws on the United States: A Comparative Look at U.S. Antibribery Legislation and the United Kingdom’s Bribery Act 2010

PDF · Michael Paul Gieger · Jan-8-2014 · 46 VAND. J. TRANSNAT’L L. 1381 (2013)

The United States has been combating the bribery of foreign officials for 35 years through the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Both domestic and international prosecutions for bribery remained almost nonexistent for decades. In recent years, the United States experienced an explosion of enforcement actions under the FCPA. Broad enforcement theories and increased prosecutorial effort have greatly expanded the scope of the FCPA. Moreover, the passage of the UK Bribery Act in 2010 has forced many U.S. organizations to face additional and conflicting antibribery regimes. Although the United States remains the world leader in prosecuting the bribery of foreign officials, the FCPA has failed to keep pace with the evolving international standard of antibribery legislation. As a result, ever-increasing uncertainty surrounds antibribery compliance and liability. In response to these concerns, Congress must amend the FCPA accordingly, as inaction will only exacerbate the current concerns.




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