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Constraining Global Corporate Power: A Short Introduction

PDF · Peter J. Spiro · Nov-8-2013 · 46 VAND. J. TRANSNAT’L L. 1101 (2013)

This Essay sets out three models of institutional constraint of global corporate power. First is private lawmaking, in which the non-state power of firms is countered by the non-state power of civil society organizations. Second are nonlegalized processes under public institutional umbrellas, in which public entities host standards-setting mechanisms. Finally, there is the prospect of fully legalized regimes, the equivalent of global regulation. These models have been emerging bottom-up rather than as part of a grand scheme. After describing the three models, this Essay considers the future of global regimes aimed at constraining corporate conduct. Distinct institutional approaches could persist. Alternatively, there may be a progression toward more robust public regulation at the global level. Power may migrate to something approximating global government, directly regulating corporations and other entities.




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ANNOUNCEMENTS

We are pleased to announce the 2013-2014 VJTL New Members

Coming up:

The Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law hosted a symposium called “The Role of Non-State Actors in International Law” at Vanderbilt University Law School in February 2013.

The October issue of the Journal will showcase articles by distinguished symposium guests including:

  • Mr. Ian Smillie, “Blood Diamonds and Non-State Actors”
  • Professor Jean d’Aspremont, “Cognitive Conflicts and the Making of International Law from Empirical Concord to Conceptual Discord in Legal Scholarship”
  • Professor Peter J. Spiro, “Constraining Global Corporate Power: A Very Short Introduction”
  • Professor Suzanne Katzenstein
  • Professor Peter Margulies
  • Professor Harlan G. Cohen

 

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