Home » Articles » Toward Facilitating a Voice for Politically Marginalized Minorities and Enhancing Presidential Public Accountability and Transparency in Foreign Health Policymaking

Toward Facilitating a Voice for Politically Marginalized Minorities and Enhancing Presidential Public Accountability and Transparency in Foreign Health Policymaking

PDF · Nina J. Crimm · Oct-16-2012 · 39 VAND. J. TRANSNAT'L L. 1053 (2006)

Residents of underdeveloped countries who belong to ethnic, racial, sexual, and political minorities usually endure relatively ineffective political voices. More than any other world population segment, these marginalized people are vulnerable to, and suffer from, compromised health and life expectancies. Their immense human tolls have spawned severe global humanitarian, economic, social, political, and security dilemmas contrary to the strategic interests of the United States. Despite recognition of these devastating harms here and abroad, the president as de facto primary U.S. foreign policymaker continues to formulate foreign health policy in an insular policymaking environment. The insularity enables the president to design policy without broad input, transparency, or public scrutiny. This Article suggests the alteration of the presidential policymaking apparatus. It proposes a concrete structure to facilitate a voice for politically marginalized minorities and to enhance public accountability and transparency in presidential foreign health policymaking, thereby collaterally imbuing the process with a new legitimacy.




Leave a Reply

ExpressO Top 10 Law Review

ANNOUNCEMENTS

We are pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Board of Editors and 2014-2015 Editorial Staff Members.

Please join us in congratulating the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 2013-2014 Annual Award Winners.

Coming up:

The Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law invites you to its 2015 Symposium, This is Not a Drill: Confronting Legal Issues in the Wake of International Disasters.

Recent and dire international disasters, both environmental and humanitarian, have left legacies not only of destruction and destitution, but also of an uncertain legal landscape. The Symposium will address current and pressing international-disaster-response topics. These will include environmental effects, disaster assistance, humanitarian assistance, and criminal processes and sanctions in the wake of various types of international disasters. Symposium participants will include leading scholars from across the country.

The 2015 Symposium will take place on Friday, February 13, 2015 at Vanderbilt Law School, 131 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37203. A detailed schedule will be available soon.

For information on the 2015 Symposium, as well as past symposia hosted by the Journal, please visit the Symposium page.

Explore Other Vanderbilt Law Resources