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Legislative Implementation of the Food Chain Approach

PDF · Jessica Vapnek · Aug-10-2012 · 40 VAND. J. TRANSNAT'L L. 987 (2007)

Food safety is an essential element of food security, since “adequate” food means food that is not only available, but also safe.  Food safety systems have traditionally focused on end-product testing, which is an unsatisfactory means of ensuring safe food.  An increasing focus on prevention has spurred interest in a food chain approach, which aims to control all steps in the food chain from production to consumption.  Although the approach has drawn international attention in recent years, national lawmakers have lacked guidance on its implementation.  This Article serves that need.  Part II of the Article describes the international backdrop to the food chain approach, discusses the main characteristics of the approach, and considers how the food chain approach is, in some respects, already being implemented in some specific areas.  As these implementations are only partial solutions, Part III outlines four areas for legislative action to implement the food chain approach more fully.  Part IV concludes by raising some outstanding questions linked to the food chain approach while noting some of the advantages its implementation is likely to offer.




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