Home » Articles » Comparative Models of Reporting Mechanisms on the Status of Trafficking in Human Beings

Comparative Models of Reporting Mechanisms on the Status of Trafficking in Human Beings

PDF · Mohamed Y. Mattar · Jul-20-2012 · 41 VAND. J. TRANSNAT'L L. 1355 (2008)

A comprehensive approach to combating trafficking in human beings requires precise knowledge of the scope of the problem and constant evaluation of government responses.  Reporting on the status of human trafficking achieves both goals.  This Article is designed to examine the various human trafficking reporting mechanisms, including reports that states are required to submit to the United Nations as well as national reports whereby governments engage in a process of self-assessment.  Comparative models from Europe and the United States will be examined.  The Article analyzes reports released by interministerial task forces as well as congressional hearings held on progress made and future steps that must be taken.  This Article advocates establishing an independent and competent national rapporteur or a similar mechanism to assess government actions to combat the problem and recommend changes that should be implemented to reform existing frameworks.  While reporting is an essential element of monitoring the status of human trafficking, it has not received adequate attention.  This Article attempts to provide the first comprehensive study on the issue.




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