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International Lens

International Lens, a film series with a global perspective, uses film screenings as a forum to promote conversation among Vanderbilt’s diverse community of students, faculty, and staff. International Lens strives to transcend geographic, ethnic, religious, linguistic, and political boundaries by facilitating conversation and greater cross-cultural understanding through cinema. The series is a partnership among the Office of the Dean of students and academic departments, centers, and programs.

Admission is FREE.

All films are open to the public. All films in Sarrett Cinema at 7:30 p.m, unless otherwise noted.

For parking maps and additional information visit www.vanderbilt.edu/internationallens or call 322-6400.

Brother Outsider
Wednesday, February 19th
Presented by: Frank E. Dobson Jr., Director, Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center and Petey Peterson, Program Coordinator, Office of LGBTQI Life

USA (2002) Dir. Nancy D. Kates. Brother Outsider relies on archival film footage and interviews to offer an incisive portrait of political activist Bayard Rustin. Although his name lacks the familiarity of other major Civil Rights leaders, the film shows that he nonetheless played a central role in the movement’s seminal events during the 1950s and 60s. [He was the principal organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Freedom in 2013.] … Rustin’s political liabilities… often kept him out of the spotlight… [Most] problematic… was Rustin’s homosexuality. [Rustin was posthumously awarded the Medal of Freedom in 2013.] Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., Rovi.

English. 89 mins. DVD.

Wagner & Me
Thursday, February 20
Presented by: Lutz Koepnick, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of German and Film Studies

UK, Switzerland, Russia, Germany (2010) Dir. Patrick McGrady. British performer Stephen Fry is a lifelong admirer of the music of Richard Wagner. He is also Jewish. Fry examines his fascination with Wagner, and confronts Wagner’s troubled legacy, whose music may be thought of as the unofficial soundtrack to the Nazi’s Holocaust atrocities, and who wrote invective propaganda against Jewish contemporaries such as Mendelssohn. Can the music that Fry loves be disentangled from its poisonous links with Hitler?

English. 89 mins. DVD. Underwritten by the German Graduate Students Association.