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GSN MONDAY MAILER JULY 21 2014

Posted by administrador on Thursday, August 28, 2014 in News.

THIS IS A HUGE MAILER WITH LOTS OF VITAL INFO

 

1.      A FEW LINKS

2.      PETITION ADVOCATING SUPPORT FOR REFUGEE CHILDREN ENTERING THE USA FROM CENTRAL AMERICA FROM MULTIPLE GSN’ERS

3.      OP-ED PIECE FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL ON MIGRATING MINORS BY GSN’ER DAVID STOLL

4.      STATEMENT ON FLACSO BY MULTIPLE MAJOR USAC SCHOOLS AND ATATEMENT ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM FROM THE Red por la Paz y el Desarrollo de Guatemala

5.      EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED FOR VICTIM OF POLITICAL PERSECUTION

6.      GREAT LOOKING NEW ARTICLE ON MALNUTRTION IN GUATEMALA FROM MULTIPLE GSN’ERS

7.      NEW MEDIA OUTLET NOMADA NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

8.      NEW BOOK OF POEMS FROM YAX TE’ PRESS

9.      NEW NOVEL FROM GSN’ERS SHIRLEY AND RUDY NELSON WITH MAJOR GUATEMALA THEME

10.  QUERY FROM JOURNALIST FOR INFO REGARDING CHILD MIGRANTS FROM CENTRAL AMERICA

11.  NEW FILM ON MAYA CERAMICS ART AND LOOTING

 

 

1.      A FEW LINKS

a.       Filmmaker to Correct 1983 Film on Guatemalan War http://bigstory.ap.org/article/filmmaker-correct-1983-film-guatemala-war (ALSO SEE ATTATCHED STATEMENT FROM PAMELA YATES)

b.      Child Migrants Fleeing More than Gang Violence http://www.newrepublic.com/article/118675/child-migrants-guatemala-are-fleeing-more-just-gang-violence

c.       Debunking 8 myths about why Central American children are Migrating http://inthesetimes.com/article/16919/8_reasons_u.s._trade_and_immigration_policies_have_caused_migration_from_ce

d.      Legacy of Bloodshed hangs over Guatemala http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/legacy-bloodshed-guatemalas

e.       OP-ED BY GSN’ER MATT SAMSON  In immigration debate, compassion should have a place http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/07/03/3983416/in-immigration-debate-compassion.html?sp=/99/108

 

 

 

2.      PETITION ADVOCATING SUPPORT FOR REFUGEE CHILDREN ENTERING THE USA FROM CENTRAL AMERICA FROM MULTIPLE GSN’ERS

As scholars of Central America and migration, we have written the below statement to urge the Obama Administration to treat the unaccompanied child migrants at the border as refugees. Some of you saw it when it was circulated earlier. If you support the statement, PLEASE CLICK ON THIS Central American Children LINK AND THEN ADD YOUR SIGNATURE AND AFFILIATION at the end of the document:  Our goal is to send the petition to President Obama and publicize it by July 22, 2014.

 The original statement is a product of collaboration among Andrea Dyrness of Trinity College; Lisa Maya Knauer of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth;  Ellen Moodie of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Debra Rodman of Randolph Macon College, with helpful comments from Geoff Thale at WOLA, Walt Little of SUNY-Albany, and Sonja Wolf of INSYDE. We’ve negotiated the wording carefully.

Thanks for your support.

Statement on Central American Children at the Border

As scholars of Central America and migration who are familiar with the conditions that cause so many children to flee their homelands, and mindful of the historical relationship between the United States and this region, we call on the Obama Administration to treat the “unaccompanied minors” at the border as refugees who are deserving of protection, due process, and humane treatment. We ask that they have access to legal representation by volunteer or government funded lawyers, in order for them to be reunited with their families as speedily as possible. Young migrants arriving from the Northern Triangle—Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras—face real and credible threats to their lives and safety in their hometowns. Further, many of them already have parents or other relatives living and working in the United States as well as personal relationships that would facilitate their transition to life in the U.S. Both the conditions of extreme insecurity in their homelands and the hardships of family separation dictate that these youth should be reunited with family members in the U.S. as swiftly as possible.

The extreme violence and economic insecurity in Central America, as well as the role of migration as a survival strategy, have deep and well-documented roots. The migration of children and youth from Central America is not new. Extortion and death threats from street gangs (some of which have their roots in Los Angeles) or organized criminals with ties to security forces have caused internal displacement and international migration for more than a decade. The local police cannot be trusted to protect these vulnerable communities and, indeed, are often part of the problem. While U.S. politicians apparently see this as a security problem for the U.S., to be resolved with more walls and detention centers, those who are truly living in insecurity and vulnerability are Salvadorans, Hondurans and Guatemalans.

Young people whose parents have migrated earlier in search of economic survival are especially vulnerable. Public schools, which should provide safety and opportunity for local youth, are often avenues of gang recruitment. In El Salvador, our research shows, youth gangs within the public high schools are connected to one of the larger street gangs, either the 18th Street (Calle 18) or Mara Salvatrucha (or MS-13). Students who graduate from these institutes are expected to join their respective gangs; those who refuse are threatened and some killed. In Guatemala, we have seen that those with migrant relatives are frequently targets for extortion. Indeed, migration often begins internally, as young people flee their homes to escape such threats. But it can be nearly impossible to escape the threats and assaults.  The extortionists and gangs are present throughout all three countries, and local gang cliques can be linked to national and sometimes even transnational criminal networks; frequently, finding a job or even working as a vendor involves paying “rent” to the gangs. Without economic options, police protection, or basic public services, eventually many people see migration beyond national borders as the only option. While Costa Rica and Mexico have also received an increase of asylum-seekers from this region, the vast majority has come to the United States, where family ties and historical geopolitical relationships have made migration trajectories all but inevitable. Child testimonies reported recently in the media echo our long-term research findings: these young people fear violence and hope to reunite with family members. Deportation would send many of them back to almost certain death and further destabilize the region, ultimately triggering more migration.

We want to emphasize that the United States is complicit in the conditions that cause so many to migrate. The reasons are many: U.S. historical support for military dictatorships and regimes of violence in the region, its promotion of free trade agreements and economic policies that have undermined subsistence agriculture and eroded public services, and its increasingly harsh immigration policies and practices that have separated families and deported too many whose livelihoods and security were in the United States. We have an opportunity and a responsibility now to make up for some past mistakes by offering humane treatment and consideration to the new arrivals and swiftly reuniting them with their family members.

3.      OP-ED PIECE FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL ON MIGRATING MINORS BY GSN’ER DAVID STOLL

 

http://online.wsj.com/articles/david-stoll-the-economics-behind-the-border-pile-up-1405380196

The Economics Behind the Border Pile-Up

For many, migration to the U.S. is a dream that can destroy families and leave people even more vulnerable.

David Stoll

 

July 14, 2014 7:23 p.m. ET

 

A peasant leader in Guatemala asked last year if I could help him get several men deported from the United States. Why? They were no longer sending money to their children, and their wives hoped they could be deported back to their responsibilities. When my friend took this petition to the Guatemalan foreign ministry, he was informed that its mission is to support migrants to the U.S., not extradite them.

The episode comes to mind as tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors, mothers and small children pile up on America's border with Mexico. As Americans debate the influx, most of us assume that a better life awaits those who are able to stay. My research in a Guatemalan town suggests that the dream of migration produces many tragedies.

The Obama administration reports a 92% surge in the detention of unaccompanied minors in the last fiscal year. Children traveling with their mothers are also overwhelming the U.S. Border Patrol. Most are Guatemalans, Hondurans and Salvadorans. Some say they are escaping gang violence—although getting through Mexico is usually more perilous for Central Americans than what they face back home. If they hail from rural areas, they are likely to have more problems with gangs in U.S. cities than where they come from.

Critics of the Obama administration say the women and children are taking advantage of its attempts to dial back immigration enforcement, such as a measure called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Northward-bound mothers tell reporters that, within a few days of being arrested, they hope to be released in the U.S. on humanitarian grounds.

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/BN-DR581_edp071_D_20140714174129.jpg

Reuters

Missing from both these explanations is an obvious concern for any needy mother traveling with small children: her relationship with the father. Either the women and children seek to join a father somewhere in the U.S. or they hope that, once inside the U.S., some combination of employment, public benefits or private charity will make up for his absence. Whatever these women's calculations and illusions, one thing is certain: They come from complicated family situations.

Child migration has been mushrooming for more than a decade. An intimate portrait of the phenomenon is Sonia Nazario's "Enrique's Journey" (Random House, 2006), about a Honduran boy who rides Mexican freight trains to find the mother who abandoned him a decade earlier. Enrique is only 5 feet tall, but he turns out to be 17 years old, has been working for years and fathered a child.

So when you read about unaccompanied children flooding detention facilities, it is important to ask: How old are they? In the U.S., anyone under age 18 is legally a minor, but the average age of unaccompanied minors caught by the U.S. Border Patrol is 14 or 15, which in Central America is old enough to work. Many of these youths are aiming for the U.S. labor market, and often with financial support from their parents.

In the Guatemalan town where I do research, approximately 20% of the working-age male population has departed for the U.S. Some men are paragons and send home every dollar they can. Thanks to their remittances, some children eat better, are better clothed and schooled. But remittances are never a secure income stream, and not merely because of U.S. deportation policies. Many migrants fail to find steady work. Some fall victim to cheap beer and other amusements. The longer they stay in the U.S., the more likely they are to start a second family.

One way to hold the original family together is for the mother and children to come north. But family reunification is no panacea even when it can be done legally. When an earner remits to his wife and children in Central America, the money goes much further than it does in the U.S. Once everyone reaches El Norte, even two parents working for the minimum wage may not be able to support a family. So their children get an education in downward mobility and relative deprivation, which is one reason immigrants brought here as boys run a high risk of being sucked into gangs.

Immigrant-rights activists insist that unauthorized border-crossers are victims of human-rights abuses. If migrants have not been victimized by their countries of origin, the argument goes, they must have been victimized by U.S. border agents' attempt to stop them. Advocates also argue that migrants have been displaced by wrongheaded U.S. policies, such as supporting dictatorships or free trade, so the U.S. has a moral obligation to accept them.

But migration itself produces victims, such as wives hoping for the deportation of their husbands, and they are far from the only ones. Where I work in Guatemala, remittances have inflated the price of land to astounding levels; most families are unable to buy property unless they can place at least one wage-earner in the U.S. So every family is under pressure to send someone north. Migrants must borrow at least $5,000 to pay human smugglers. Many pay 10% monthly interest and put up family land as collateral. So they're betting the farm. When something goes wrong, they lose it.

Migration on these terms is not a solution to the problems facing Central Americans. Because jobs in the U.S. are scarce, and living costs are so high compared with Central America, even legal migration can beggar them.

So what about all those women and children piling up on the border? Humanitarian advocates assume that the U.S. is their sanctuary—but what if it is the illusions of migration that wrecked their families in the first place?

Mr. Stoll is the author of "El Norte or Bust! How Migration Fever and Microcredit Produced a Financial Crash in a Latin American Town" (Rowan & Littlefield, 2012).

4.      STATEMENT ON FLACSO BY MULTIPLE MAJOR USAC SCHOOLS AND ATATEMENT ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM FROM THE Red por la Paz y el Desarrollo de Guatemala

(SEE ATTACHMENTS ABOVE)

 

5.      EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED FOR VICTIM OF POLITICAL PERSECUTION

My name is Cynthia Rigney. I'm an immigration attorney in Round Rock, and I'm looking for an expert for an asylum case. My client's asylum claim is based on the persecution he suffered at the hands of members of Libertad Democrática Renovada (LIDER) group in Guatemala.

 

Would you be able to speak as to the reputation of this group in particular or the political climate in Guatemala in general? If so, I would ask for a report to submit to the court (at a date to be set by the judge) and possible availability to testify at my client's merits hearing (which may be as early as late July or early August).

 

I realize this is all very short notice, so please feel free to call me at my office (512) 574-6595 or cell phone (737) 932-2515 to discuss this further. Thank you in advance.

 

Sincerely,



Cynthia Karina Rigney

Attorney at Law | Abogada de Inmigración

 

The Rigney Law Firm, P.L.L.C.

1000 Heritage Center Circle | Suite 145

Round Rock, TX 78664

T: (512) 574-6595 | F: 1 (512) 595-3167

www.rigneylawfirm.com

6.      GREAT LOOKING NEW ARTICLE ON MALNUTRTION IN GUATEMALA FROM MULTIPLE GSN’ERS

mixed-methods study identifies key strategies for improving infant and young child feeding practices in a highly stunted rural indigenous population in Guatemala

this article by our group may interest some at GSN

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mcn.12141/abstract

 


Peter Rohloff MD PhD
Director Médico
Wuqu' Kawoq – Maya Health Alliance
www.wuqukawoq.org

www.mayahealth.org
www.futuroscolectivos.com
peter@wuqukawoq.org

 

7.      NEW MEDIA OUTLET NOMADA NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT

http://indievoic.es/#/project/22/story

Why do we need Nómada in Guatemala?

Guatemala’s political culture has been dominated by fear during 30 years of brutal dictatorships. Power and resources remain in the hands of the powerful few, an arrangement that suits the traditional media all too well. As the country slowly becomes more democratic, it is desperately in need of reflective changes in the media sector: journalism that is truly independent from the government, big corporations and media moguls, in order to empower and inform its citizens and build a strong democracy.  

From 2011 to 2013, some of us had the opportunity to create an investigative online media for a private university. We not only demonstrated that high-quality, transparent and courageous journalism is possible in Guatemala, but showed that it can be executed to the highest standards of the best Latin American media. 

Now we are building a more independent, more transparent and feminist media.

How will we do it?

Nomada.gt is a new online media formed by rigorous, committed journalists, with a three-fold attack to engage and inform society:

  1. Investigative political journalism the highest of standards
  2. Data-visualization tools for users to interact with information
  3. Journalism on micro-politics and every-day life inspired in cultural studies or articles like “What can straight couples learn from same-sex couples“ from The Atlantic

With a team made up of seven journalists, a graphic designer, a computer programmer and fifteen bloggers nurturing our content, Nómada will make Guatemalan society more transparent and help it to reach a true democracy through information. 

How will we make it sustainable?

Inspired by the best online media in Latin America, we will start with a $150,000 loan applied for by the editor-in-chief, Martín Rodríguez Pellecer. Along with grants from foundations that believe in us and our goals, plus investments made by prestigious partners including journalists Harris Whitbeck (Guatemalan, ex CNN), Carlos Dada (Salvadorian, editor in chief of ElFaro.net), anthropologist Marta Casaús (researcher on racism that participated in trial on genocide against former dictator Ríos Montt) and other businessmen who believe in a transparent democracy, this will give us the best start possible as we strive for sustainability and success.

By its second year, Nómada will be sustained by advertisement (40 per cent), grants (40 per cent), crowd funding (10 per cent) and other activities such as fundraising (10 per cent). Guatemala is the country with the fastest internet growth in Latin America and subsequently offers its highest market opportunities. Combined, this will help us reach our budget of US$30,000 per month. An institutional developer and a community developer will help the journalists with the tasks of fundraising and strengthening the community of readers.

Be part of this change

Nómada can and will be possible thanks to the support of generous individuals like you, people who believe in its mission and the track record of its founder, its partners and its members. By supporting independent journalism you are helping Guatemalans access the opportunities they rightfully deserve. We encourage you to make a donation and become a part of this transformative community. 

8.      NEW BOOK OF POEMS FROM YAX TE’ PRESS

 

 

Yax Te’ is pleased to announce the publication of Xumakil / Botón en Flor / Budding, a collection of poems by Gaspar Pedro González the well-known Mayan author from Soloma. Written in Q’anjob’al and Spanish, the poems were translated into English by Elaine Elliot, Robert McKenna Brown and Hana Muzika Kahn. The title—Xumakil, represents the budding flower of the Q’anjob’al language and culture. The poetic themes include close family relationships, community life, natural beauty, the profound significance of Q’anjob’al traditions and customs, and the anguish of language loss and discrimination.

This trilingual poetry collection celebrates the Q’anjob’al culture and traditions as well as the importance of keeping the Q’anjob’al language alive. As such, it is of special interest to linguists and scholars interested in the preservation and rights of Mayan languages and culture.

Xumakil / Botón en Flor / Budding was launched at the Latin American Studies Association conference in Chicago, in May 2014. Thanks to the support of Chris Lutz and Guisela Asensio of the Maya Educational Foundation, it will be presented at CIRMA (Center for Mesoamerican Research) in Antigua on July 26, 2014.

The book is available for $10 + postage/handling from hmkahn@yaxtebooks.com.

Yax Te’s bilingual editions of Gaspar Pedro González’ earlier titles La Otra Cara/ A Mayan Life, (a testimonial novel) Return of the Maya /Retorno de los Mayas (a child’s exile during the armed conflict) and Palabras Mayas (poems) are also available for purchase.

Hana Muzika Kahn, Yax Te’ Books.

 

 

9.      NEW NOVEL FROM GSN’ERS SHIRLEY AND RUDY NELSON WITH MAJOR GUATEMALA THEME

 

http://riskofreturning.com/

 

 

10.  QUERY FROM JOURNALIST FOR INFO REGARDING CHILD MIGRANTS FROM CENTRAL AMERICA

 

My name is Sam Quinones. I'm a journalist and author.

I'm writing because I noticed you're affiliated with the Guatemalan Scholars Network. I'm writing a piece for Americas Quarterly (http://www.americasquarterly.org/current) about the immigrant kids from Central America.

I wanted to talk to some folks regarding whether any money the Obama administration destines to Guatemala or the other CA countries for long-term remediation of the core problems that push kids and others to go on this harrowing journey would have any effect, whether the govts there are willing and institutionally capable to put any such monies to good use.

 

I ask because it's my impression that often remesas become like a narcotic to state and federal govts and any intention to do something that would keep that money from coming in would be dwarfed by the size of remesas and what they mean to the Guatemalan or Salvadoran or Honduran economy.

 

Is this something you've worked on? If not, would know anyone you could recommend.

Meanwhile, you can see more about me at my website below.

 

Many thanks,

 

Sam Quinones
      Sam Quinones     journalist & author

   Cellphone       323-428-0540

   Website:          www.samquinones.com
   Blog:               www.samquinones.com/reporters-blog
   Twitter:           @samquinones7
   Facebook:       www.facebook.com/samquinones7 (Friend me or Subscribe)

   Address:          PO Box 50561

                          Los Angeles, CA, 90050

 

11.  NEW FILM ON MAYA CERAMICS ART AND LOOTING

 

I was exploring the Guatemala Scholars Network and came across your names as contacts. I am writing to you regarding our new documentary film, DANCE OF THE MAIZE GOD, which explores the royal life and rich mythology of the ancient Maya, as well as the tangled issues involved in the collection and study of looted art. We filmed most of this documentary in Guatemala and especially feature the Petén.

 

Dance of the Maize God was funded by the National Endowment for Humanities as part of their Bridging Cultures through Film initiative. One of our mandates from the NEH is to hold screenings at universities and museums accompanied by post-screening audience discussions exploring the amazing art and various issues raised in the film. Panelists have included art historians, archaeologists, curators and other scholars.

 

The film was first shown in Antigua in January as part of the University of Texas Austin Maya Meetings. Its U.S. Premiere was at San Antonio's CineFestival, the nation's oldest Latino film festival. It has also screened at Montreal's International Festival of Films on Art (FIFA), the Princeton University Art Museum, Tulane, and the Archaeology Channel International Film Festival where it won Best Film. This spring we also had a 2-night event at the Beach Museum of Art at Kansas State University, with our previous film BREAKING THE MAYA CODE playing on the first night.

 

Here is a link to more information on this new film, including a complete list of screenings and a short trailer:

 

http://nightfirefilms.org/films/dance-of-the-maize-god/

 

We welcome any ideas you might have as to how we might bring this film to more universities and venues in the U.S. and Guatemala.

 

Thank you for your time and consideration, Rosey

 

———–

Rosey Guthrie

Producer

Dance of the Maize God

Night Fire Films

3711 Ocean View Ave.

Los Angeles, CA 90066

guthrie@nightfirefilms.org

(310) 821-9133

 


Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226

 

 

4 Attachments

 

Preview attachment Comunicado FLACSO 2014.jpg

Preview attachment 140607 PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION STATEMENT_2 – SPANISH1.docx

Preview attachment PronunciamientoLibertadAcademicarevisado docx (3).pdf

Preview attachment Statement on Central American Children at the Border



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