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GSN MONDAY MAILER DECEMBER 9 2013

Posted by administrador on Monday, December 9, 2013 in News.

1.       HELP SUPPORT FREE AND FAIR ELECTIONS IN NEBAJ
2.       US ARMY INVOLVED IN RESEARCH ON CENTRAL AMERICAN INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
3.       LISTEN TO HABLAGUATE BROADCAST OF GSN’ERS DAVID STOLL AND JEAN-MARIE SIMON DISCUSSING THE RIOS MONTT CASE
4.       K’ICHE’ ORIAL HISTORIES AVAILABLE IN ON-LINE DATABASE
5.       EDELBERTO TORRES RIVAS WINS LASA AWARD FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES MONOGRAPH OF 2013
6.       RECENT PIECES ON THE TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF CIRMA
7.       OSEA FIELD RESEARCH COURSES IN THE YUCATAN
 


 
1.       HELP SUPPORT FREE AND FAIR ELECTIONS IN NEBAJ
 
"Mi nombre es Matilde Terraza. Soy maya Ixil de Nebaj. Nebaj es uno de los tres municipios de la región Ixil fuertemente golpeados por el conflicto armado en Guatemala que terminó en 1996 con los Acuerdos de Paz.
 
El 15 de diciembre 2013 se llevarán a cabo una repetición de elección a Alcalde municipal, luego de que la Corte de Constitucionalidad de Guatemala ordenó esta repetición de elección en Nebaj después de que uno de los candidatos tomó acciones legales y solicitó la anulación de la primera elección en 2011 ya que su nombre no apareció en las papeletas electorales porque sufrió dificultades legales y jurídicas en su proceso de inscripción como candidato.
 
Como mujer maya Ixil, estoy coordinando un proyecto de observación electoral junto con Acción Ciudadana, una organización que promueve la transparencia.  Estaré coordinando aproximadamente 75 voluntarios de Nebaj para observar las elecciones después de haber sido capacitados y certificados como observadores por Acción Ciudadana. Esta OBSERVACIÓN podrá ayudar a reducir o evitar posibles conflictos durante el proceso electoral o posibles desacuerdos sobre el resultado. Es necesario garantizar un proceso electoral justo y transparente en mi municipio con el fin de resolver el actual estancamiento político y para recuperar la confianza de la población y de los votantes en la política y en sus gobiernos.
 
Puesto que no hay financiamiento para esta observación porque no estamos en época electoral y por la época del año en la que se realiza la repetición de elección, el grupo de Jóvenes Voluntarios necesitamos de su ayuda para hacer esta observación una realidad. Todos los fondos recaudados se destinarán a la provisión de alimentos y gastos de transporte de todos los voluntarios para ser capacitados y viajar a sus mesas de votación para la observación el próximo 15 de Diciembre.
 
Necesitamos recaudar más Q13,700.00 equivalente a $1,750.00  que dividido resulta sólo 90 personas donando $20.00 cada uno en la próxima semana! Su apoyo puede marcar una gran diferencia para el pueblo de Nebaj y para el proceso Democrático que dará forma a nuestra vida cotidiana después de esta elección.
 
Por favor visite http://observe.hablacentro.com y haga una donación deducible de impuestos a través de Paypal.  
Gracias por su apoyo que hace posible un proceso electoral transparente y que hace posible recuperar la estabilidad política en el municipio de Nebaj."
 


2.       US ARMY INVOLVED IN RESEARCH ON CENTRAL AMERICAN INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
 
Once again the indigenous peoples of Central America and our territories become military targets. According to the last issue of the Lawrence Journal published on June 13, the State Department approved funds for the Minerva Research Project related to the Bowman Expeditions, which will be responsible for mapping 59 indigenous peoples in Central America.

The project is called Centroamérica Indígena and is a replica of the controversial México Indígena project (2005-2008), which was denounced by the Union of Organizations of the of Oaxaca (UNOSOJ). The group pointed out that the geographers of the University of Kansas who were in charge of implementing the project had not told the affected groups about their connections with the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO).

The Bowman Expeditions gathered information for the database of the Human Terrain System, used as part of the United States military strategy in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the case of Mexico Indígena, the studies were carried out in the Huasteca and the Sierra of Oaxaca, places where there is strong resistance to the Land Entitlement Project PROCEDE, financed by the World Bank for the purpose of doing away with the system of communally-held lands and replacing it with individual ownership.

The Demarest Factor: Communal property and the supposed “incitement to violence”
Lieutenant Colonel Geoffrey B. Demarest, assigned to the Mexico Indígena Project and a participant in the Bowman Expedition, known as Comuna 13 in Medellin Colombia, has repudiated communal property a number of times. In one of his texts entitled “Geoproperty: Foreign Affairs, National Security and Property Rights,” he stresses that “informal and unregulated land ownership fosters illicit use and violence,” and suggests that the only solution for these breeding grounds of crime and insurgency is privatization through land entitlement.

In Honduras, OFRANEH has strongly denounced the activity of the World Bank through its Land Administration Program Project in Honduras (PATH, in Spanish), which has promoted Chapter III of the Property Law, specifically Article 100, currently in force, that is designed to revoke communal titles issued by the State in recent decades.
Our organization appealed to the Inspection Panel of the World Bank, pointing out violations of the operational directives having to do with indigenous peoples. In its Report, the Panel stated that the State of Honduras violated Convention No. 169 of the International Labor Organization (ILO) upon failing to recognize the right to consultation with regards to the development of the Law in question, and also noted a series of irregularities committed by the World Bank in its administration of the PATH project.
The current post-coup government in Honduras, through the law governing Special Development Regions (RED, in Spanish), also known as the Model Cities Project, planned to auction off land to foreign investors consisting of an area inhabited by 24 Garífuna communities. The RED law was replaced by the Law of Employment and Economic Development Zones (ZEDE), and by the new Law for the Promotion of Development and Public Debt Restructuring Act (the Mortgage Law), which has not yet gone into effect.

The breaking up of communal property that still exists in the Garifuna communities is an example of the double-speak of state officials and financial organizations that are aware of the domino effect of the land sales that will take place through property individualization.

A State offensive against the indigenous peoples of Central America
In recent years, the implementation of the Mesoamerica Project, previously known as the Plan Puebla Panamá, has led to repressive measures against indigenous peoples that have stated their opposition to the construction of hundreds of dam and reservoir projects in their territories as well as exploitation through mining. From San Cristobal Barrillas (Guatemala) to Tabasara (Panamá), a cry has been raised in indigenous communities that were never consulted, yet see now their habitats being flooded by the dam projects.

The right to Consultation and Free, Prior, and Informed Consent established in Convention 169 of the ILO, which has been signed and ratified by almost all the Central American countries, is systematically violated. All indications are that both national and foreign investment is more important that safeguarding indigenous peoples and their cultures, which are intimately tied to Mother Earth.

The reaction of peoples to territorial plunder and the resulting displacement of the populations have aroused an enormous interest on the part of armies and repressive forces that seek to neutralize peaceful claims being made by the peoples in resistance and some of their organizations.
FMSO personnel regard Central America as part of the United States borderlands, and in the name of the supposed war on drugs, the US is directly intervening in the area with the creation of military bases and now the Centroamérica Indígena project, through which they intend to generate a database of the terrestrial geography of the 59 peoples inhabiting the Isthmus.

Human Terrain System in the Moskitia and inclusion without consultation of the Garífuna communities
Between May and September of 2011, the geographers at the University of Kansas associated with the United States Army, carried out rigorous mapping of the territory ranging from Cabo Camarón to Río Coco, including the Garífuna communities where people were never consulted.
What a coincidence that in May of 2012, the Northern Coast of Honduras was the target of a military operation that included psychological operations (psy-ops). State Department helicopters engaged in low nocturnal flights over cities and communities, and these air missions culminated in the massacre of innocent Miskito people by the Río Patuca.

The obvious militarization that besets Central America after the unstoppable increase in violence, which by the way, is almost nonexistent in the indigenous communities, is part of a strategy of the subjugation and looting of our territories, where a good part of the remaining “natural resources” are found.
Sambo Creek, La Ceiba Atlantida, October 1, 2013
Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras, OFRANEH
OFRANEH
Organizacion Fraternal Negra Hondureña
Sambo Creek, Atlántida.
Honduras
source: http://elenemigocomun.net/2013/10/central-america-bowman-expeditions/
 


 
3.       LISTEN TO HABLAGUATE BROADCAST OF GSN’ERS DAVID STOLL AND JEAN-MARIE SIMON DISCUSSING THE RIOS MONTT CASE
 
David Stoll and Jean-Marie Simon discuss the genocide framework with journalists Kara Andrade and Mike McDonald in the latest installment of the webcast HablaGuate:
 
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/mesapublica/2013/12/02/was-there-genocide-in-guatemala .  

 

 


 
4.       K’ICHE’ ORIAL HISTORIES AVAILABLE IN ON-LINE DATABASE
 I am writing on behalf of the Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) at the University of New Mexico to announce the availability of the LAII’s K’iche’ Maya Oral History Project as an innovative resource for students and teachers of the K’iche’ Maya language. The project features 149 oral histories, including audio files and written transcripts, which are now available free online through the LAII at http://laii.unm.edu/kiche. These materials are an invaluable resource for anthropologists, linguists, folklorists, and other students of K’iche’ culture and language. In addition, others may find the project useful as a model for compiling and disseminating oral histories generally. We kindly ask for your assistance in sharing this announcement with your relevant audiences. For complete details regarding the project, please see the attached materials. Questions or comments should be directed to Keira Philipp-Schnurer at kphilipp@unm.edu . Sincerely, Adam Flores Graduate Assistant UNM LAII

 

 


5.       EDELBERTO TORRES RIVAS WINS LASA AWARD FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES MONOGRAPH OF 2013
 

 

 

http://www.fygeditores.com/emails/spacer.gif«El Premio Iberoamericano se entrega en todos los Congresos Internacionales de LASA al mejor libro sobre Latinoamérica en el área de las Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades»
http://www.fygeditores.com/emails/spacer.gif
http://www.fygeditores.com/imagenes/Torres-Rivas/2Revolucionessincambiosrevolucionarios_150.gifTorres-Rivas, Edelberto. Revoluciones sin cambios revolucionarios. Ensayos sobre la crisis en Centroamérica. (Premio LASA 2013 al Libro Iberoamericano) Guatemala: F&G Editores, julio de 2013, 2da. edición – revisada y corregida. xii+506 págs. 12.7 x 20.3 cms. ISBN: 978-9929-552-75-3. Rústica.
Precio: US$ 27.50 Q 150.00 http://www.fygeditores.com/emails/spacer.gif

 


6.       RECENT PIECES ON THE TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF CIRMA
 
a.        http://www.acnur.org/t3/uploads/media/9355.pdf?view=1
b.  http://www.elperiodico.com.gt/es/20131204/lacolumna/239046/
c.       Pronunciamiento sobre cierre de CIRMA  Comunidad de Estudios Mayas Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Nosotras y nosotros Comunidad de Estudios Mayas y Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia, manifestamos nuestra preocupación y nos pronunciamos con respecto al cierre abrupto del Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica (CIRMA). Esta situación coloca en peligro la existencia de los fondos documentales y demás bienes confiados a esta institución a lo largo de su existencia; termina con una institución que podría ser de provecho para la generación de conocimiento y memoria histórica de los pueblos, e irrespeta los derechos de los trabajadores, 
 
1.    Debido a la larga historia de expropiación en este país, tenemos el temor de que los archivos (fotografías, registros visuales y digitales, y documentos históricos únicos) acumulados por CIRMA, salgan de Guatemala o caigan en manos privadas de sectores conservadores, como ha ocurrido con tantos bienes, -especialmente patrimonio de los pueblos indígenas-, apropiados por grupos dominantes.
 
2.    Tomamos posición como mayas, porque no vemos los archivos en sentido estricto y exclusivo como un patrimonio nacional y universal. Para nosotras  y nosotros representan primero, la evidencia gráfica e histórica de las formas de dominación y de intermediación que desde la colonia se establecieron sobre hombres y mujeres que conformamos los pueblos indígenas y campesinos tanto en este país como en Mesoamérica. Las imágenes y los documentos exhiben también las miradas y las ideas sobre nuestros predecesores y su pasado. Éstas además, guardan la memoria de las estrategias políticas, formas de irrupción y negociación que a lo largo de la historia crearon los pueblos indígenas y campesinos. Y también, es un espacio donde se puede encontrar las imágenes y las ideas de aquellos sujetos que históricamente han tenido la posibilidad de construir los proyectos de dominación en Guatemala, a los que queremos seguir interpelando.
 
3.    Reclamamos este lugar como nuestro, no porque hayamos tenido participación activa como investigadores indígenas, al contrario nuestra ausencia ha sido marcada como suele suceder en los escasos centros de investigación de este país; pero CIRMA se ha conformado, en gran medida, sobre el estudio de la realidad de los pueblos indígenas y campesinos. Por lo tanto, es vital retomarlo como un espacio para reconstruir la memoria desde los pueblos y de las comunidades indígenas, campesinos, mujeres y de sectores populares de Mesoamérica.
 
4.    Los acervos acumulados por CIRMA deben ser convertidos en lugares o espacios de memoria insurgente, porque la administración y el recuerdo del pasado ha de ser un trabajo desde los pueblos y desde las luchas.
 
Por lo anterior:
 
1.    Demandamos que este gran archivo mesoamericano que se ha formado sobre la imagen y la realidad de los pueblos indígenas, campesinos y demás luchas realizadas en Guatemala, no sean sacados del país, ni sean trasferidos a manos privadas.
2.    Qué no se defraude la confianza de los pueblos indígenas y campesinos, ni de las personas que han confiado su patrimonio a CIRMA.
3.    Nos solidarizamos con las y los trabajadores de CIRMA que fueron cesados del trabajo sin previo aviso.
4.    Si los rumores de privatización de la institución o de ser trasladada al extranjero, no son certeras, solicitamos información amplia sobre las decisiones que se han tomado.
 
Guatemala, 4 de diciembre del 2013
 
Edgar Eskit,  Comunidad  de Estudios Mayas
Aura Cumes, Comunidad de Estudios Mayas
Gladys Tzul, Comunidad de Estudios Mayas/
Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Emilio del Valle Escalante, Comunidad de Estudios Mayas
Jovita Tzul, Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Aura Marina Chojolan, Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Miriam Batz, Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Irma Gutiérrez, Colectivo de Fotógrafas Indígenas Con Voz Propia
Francisca Gómez Grijalva
Máximo Ba Tiul
Irma Alicia Velásquez
Ajb’ee Jiménez

 

 


7.       OSEA FIELD RESEARCH COURSES IN THE YUCATAN
 
OSEA Summer 2014 Ethnography Field School
now offers students the opportunity to participate as researchers–in–training in one of three ongoing research projects.  Students choose an area and issue of research and then through close mentoring develop their own research project that is conducted either as an individual or in a team.  Students are trained in specific research methodologies of ethnographic interviewing, participant observation, visual ethnography, photo documentation, and questionnaire surveys.
Open to undergraduates in all social science and humanities fields of study.
 
·         Emergent Cultures Research Sexualities, Sociality, Subjectivities
·         Sustainable Community Tourism Development. Applied and Basic Research
·         Health, Healing, Belief (4 or 7 week program) Ethnography of Food & Medical pluralism
 
We encourage interested graduate students to contact OSEA director in order to craft your participation in the OSEA research projects to fit your thesis and dissertation objectives
 
Spanish is required.  Researchers with low Spanish proficiency conduct English language surveys questionnaires of tourists at Chichén Itzá
www.osea-cite.org
Accredited through partnership with the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
·         Homestay Immersion                                                                         
·         Spanish is required
Interested Graduate Students contact OSEA Director
quetzil@osea-cite.org 
Emergent Cultures Research Sexualities, Sociality, Subjectivities
This research project is an ethnographic investigation of the emergence of new Maya cultures in a transnational rural setting in relationship to globalization. This project shifts focus from "traditional Maya culture" to issues of how new life-styles, modes of subjectivity, forms of sociality and sexuality are creatively invented by Maya as they negotiate transformations in social community.

 

 

Sustainable Community Tourism Development
Applied Community Action Research and Cultural Analyses Research
This research project is an ethnographic investigation of sustainable community tourism in the context of increasing state-governmental control of and transnational private sector investment in the local tourism economy. Specifically, this is a study of how community members of Pisté can develop tourism in new and alternative ways that maximize their own individual and collective benefits from tourism.

Health, Healing, Belief (4 or 7 week program)
Ethnography of Food and Medical Pluralism
This research project is an investigation of how Maya negotiate their own contradictory beliefs and attitudes about the efficacy of Maya healing practices and Western allopathic medicine.  Specifically, the research program focuses on: how health is envisioned through food and home remedies; how healing is practiced by traditional healers and rural allopathic doctors; and how people experience illness in terms of spiritual etiology and/or biomedical dis-ease.
 Courses are accredited through partnership with the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
·        Homestay Immersion
·        Spanish is required
·        Interested Graduate Students contact OSEA Director 
quetzil@osea-cite.org
 www.osea-cite.org/program/
   
Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
Baylor University
(254) 710-6226

 

 

 

 



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