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GSN MONDAY MAILER SEPTEMBER 16 2013

Posted by administrador on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 in News.

1.       NOAA LOOKING FOR EXPERT ON MAYA AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

2.       SOME GREAT LINKS FOR RECENT NEWS ABOUT GUATEMALA (AND A BONUS ONE ON THE FIRST ELECTED GAY MAYOR IN MEXICO!)

3.       SLACA INVITED PANELS FOR UPCOMING AAA MEETINGS IN CHICAGO

 

 

 

1.       NOAA LOOKING FOR EXPERT ON MAYA AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

 

A colleague just wrote me the note below. I am not currently up on those working in this area of the world. Any suggestions I can pass on to him — people with some experience in Mayan populations, water quality, and fisheries?

 

"I'm working on a proposal with others that's focused on water quality problems (eutrophication, toxic cyanobacterial blooms) in a lake (Atitlan) in the Guatemalan highlands.  We'd like to include an anthropologist who might have interest/expertise in indigenous Mayan populations and environmental issues.  There are some fisheries issues too, which may be connected to the water quality issues. Does anyone come to mind?"

 

Thanks for anyplace to start.

 

Trish Clay


Dr. Patricia M. Clay Anthropologist NOAA Fisheries

Patricia.M.Clay@noaa.gov

301.427.8116

http://nefsc.noaa.gov/read/socialsci/

2.       SOME GREAT LINKS FOR RECENT NEWS ABOUT GUATEMALA (AND A BONUS ONE ON THE FIRST ELECTED GAY MAYOR IN MEXICO!)

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2013/09/2013913174222513256.html  40 Years After the Original 9/11 Disaster

http://www.politico.com/story/2013/09/bringing-war-criminals-to-justice-in-guatemala-96673.html#ixzz2egh657sj Bringing War Criminals to Justice in Guatemala

http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2013/09/10/world/europe/10reuters-austria-guatemala.html?ref=americas&_r=0  Guatemalan             Policeman Denies Role in Prison Murder in Austrian Trial

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-24103931 Mexico's first openly gay mayor takes office in Zacatecas

 

 

 

3.       SLACA INVITED PANELS FOR UPCOMING AAA MEETINGS IN CHICAGO

 

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) will sponsor two invited sessions for the 112th AAA Annual Meeting in Chicago, with its theme of “Future Publics, Current Engagements.” We received a stimulating number of proposals of remarkable quality. For the 2013 meeting, SLACA aimed at selecting panels that frame outstanding academic discussions, which can contribute to ongoing debates and cutting-edge research in the anthropology of the Latin American and Caribbean region.

The panel “Crowds and Citizenries in Latin America” (session #8122) examines the ambivalent oscillations between crowds and (liberal) citizenries in a range of national contexts, including Argentina, Cuba, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela. The papers analyze (neo)liberal discourses that define citizenship and the governance of masses in the urban space. The panel is organized by Rihan Yeh (El Colegio de Michoacán) and Rafael Sánchez (Amsterdam UC). Rosalind Morris (Columbia U) and William Mazzarella (U Chicago) will serve as discussants.

The session consists of eight papers. In his piece “Unruly Crowds and the Military: Mexico, 1913,” Claudio Lomnitz (Columbia U) debates on the military fantasy that shaped the Mexican public sphere during the counter-revolutionary regime of Victoriano Huerta. Sarah Muir (Columbia U) discusses in her paper “Citizen Networks: Solidarity and Class in Post-Crisis Buenos Aires” the voluntaristic relations of intimacy, spontaneity, and transparency among piqueteros, unemployed workers in Argentina. Alejandra Leal (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) looks at parking meters as the materialization of urban modernity in an upper middle class neighborhood in her contribution “Parking meters, informal workers and anxieties about urban (dis)order in Mexico City.” The paper “El Zapatazo Limpio: Late liberal outrage in El Salvador” by Ellen Moodie (U Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) examines the rise of social movements in digital media and the dynamics of power among generations. Daniella Gandolfo (Wesleyan U) investigates in her piece “Crowds and Fire at Mesa Redonda in Lima” the neoliberal understanding of informality and social order in a Peruvian marketplace. The paper “Monuments and Crowds” by Rafael Sánchez (Amsterdam UC) explores the monumentalization of politics in the public space in Venezuela. Cross-border mobility, automotive traffic and modernity at the Mexico/US border are the topics of the Rihan Yeh’s (El Colegio de Michoacán) paper “Two Types of Traffic in Tijuana.” Joao Goncalves (U Chicago) analyzes the nationalistic rituals in Cuba’s urban space in his piece “Sovereignty and Carnival in Havana’s May Day.”

The other SLACA 2013 invited session will be “Engaging Black and Feminist Anthropolog(IES): Questions of Methods, Theory, and Practice Within and Outside the Discipline” (session #8348). It is organized by Riche Daniel Barnes (Smith C) and has Rachel J Watkins (American U) as discussant. This session commemorates the publication of the volume Black feminist, Black anthropology, feminist anthropology, and all three, Black feminist anthropology by Johnnetta B Cole (2001), and it seeks to explore the discourses, methodologies, epistemologies, and pedagogical practices within the discipline in relation to Black feminism. The participants further the discourse on feminist anthropology through ethnographies of Black women in the Caribbean and US. The case studies include Jamaica and the Dominican Republic.

The session consists of four papers. In “The Making of a Legacy: The Story Behind ‘Black Feminist Anthropology: Theory, Politics, Praxis, and Poetics,” Irma McClaurin (McClaurin Solutions), editor of the book Black Feminist Anthropology: Theory, Politics, Praxis, and Poetics, will talk on the conceptualization of the publication, the challenges it faced, and the response to it. Corliss D Heath (U South Florida) presents the paper “The Contributions of Black Feminist Anthropology in HIV Research,” arguing that the HIV risk for Black women is shaped by the social and cultural context of their lived experiences. In her piece “Global Black Feminism and Red De Mujeres: An Afro-Latin American and Caribbean Women’s Network and Agenda,” Kimberly Simmons (U South Carolina) explores the organization of a network representing several Black women’s groups in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. Bianca Williams (U Colorado, Boulder) debates on what it means for Black feminists to make anthropology and conduct fieldwork in her presentation “‘I Am Telling You, You’re Gonna Love Me!’: Black Feminist Anthropologists Still Braving The Field.”

For detailed information about the day and time of the SLACA invited sessions, please check the meeting’s final program on the AAA website.

- See more at: http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2013/09/06/slaca-2013-invited-sessions/#sthash.OY5D3M0C.dpuf

 

 

 
 

 

Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226

 

 



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