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GSN MONDAY MAILER SEPTEMBER 09 2013

Posted by administrador on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 in News.

1.       GUNMEN KILL 11 IN SAN JOSE NACAHUIL
2.       SAD NEWS ABOUT THE PASSING OF FRANK TAYLOR
3.       HUD BAY WILL NOT APPEAL RULING ON THE SHIFT TO CANADA OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE CASES
4.       NEW FROM F&G/ PLAZA PUBLICA A MONOGRAPH ON THE CIVIL WAR ATTACKS ON LA “U” DURING THE 80S
 

 

 
1.       GUNMEN KILL 11 IN SAN JOSE NACAHUIL
 

Gunmen kill 11, wound 18 in poor Guatemala town
SONIA PEREZ D. AP. September 9, 13

SAN JOSE NACAHUIL, Guatemala — A group of men in a stolen car shot 29 people on the main street of a poor indigenous town in the mountains outside Guatemala City, killing 11 in an incident that some residents blamed on corrupt police officers.

Officials blamed the attack on gang violence but that was greeted with skepticism by some residents of San Jose Nacahuil. Residents expelled the national police six years ago and set up a community police force that patrols with sticks and machetes, and officials said the community had low crime rates in recent years.

Eight of the dead were shot in a just-opened cantina, a one-story cinderblock building where men were drinking beer and liquor around plastic tables. The majority of the wounded were shot in the street between the cantina and a second, older bar owned by the same local businessman. Two of those shot in the street died, along with a man shot in the second cantina.

Interior Minister Mauricio Lopez Bonilla said the National Civil Police sent a patrol car to the town Saturday night after receiving an anonymous call reporting fears of an imminent attack. Officers "determined that everything was OK and the patrol car left," he said. "One hour later, the attack happened."

A relative of the cantina owner, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of official retaliation, said the owner reported that the police arrived without warning, said they were checking the permits for the new cantina and demanded a $60 bribe to approve them. When the man refused, the police told him to get all minors out of the bar and left, the relative said.

"He came home, said the police had come to ask for the papers and asked him for 500 quetzales. Then when he didn't give it to them, they told him not to sell liquor to minors and get them out of the bar," the relative said. "Soon afterward I heard the shots. It seems like he hid in the bathroom and they killed him there."

Regional police spokesman Jorge Aguilar suggested the attackers may have been gang members who tried to buy liquor in the bars but were refused. Many townspeople said they didn't believe that.

"We think the patrol car had something to do with it, because they showed up and 20 minutes after they left there was the attack," said Santos Peinado, a 28-year-old constructions worker whose cousin, Santos Suret, was killed. "Why didn't they stay and why didn't they arrest the attackers?"

The Kaqchikel Maya town of about 7,500 people sits 11 miles (18 kilometers) northeast of Guatemala City, but takes more than an hour to reach because it is accessible by a single dirt road. Many of its men work temporary constructions jobs in the city, and the town has virtually no running water or indoor plumbing.

Lopez Bonilla noted the town has had a troubled history with police, with none stationed there because villagers burned down the police station several years ago. Residents said the incident erupted after the police falsely accused local men of kidnapping.

Lopez Bonilla called the town "a very well organized community" with a very low crime rate, despite the violence that plagues Guatemala City and the drug-gang clashes that have led to mass murders in some other parts of the country.

Mexico's Zetas drug gang has seized control of large swaths of territory along Guatemala's northern border, where it is blamed for large-scale violence including the massacre of 27 farm workers in 2011. Drug cartels have far less presence in the area of Saturday's shooting, though residents said there is also some gang presence in nearby towns, mostly of small local groups that engage in robbery and extortion.

The National Police still operate in those towns along the same dirt road. Across the country, the police force has been frequently accused of corruption, extortion and links to local gangs.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
2.       SAD NEWS ABOUT THE PASSING OF FRANK TAYLOR
 
Hello GSNers,
 
For those of you who knew Frank Taylor during the decades that he lived in Guatemala, I wanted to share the news that he passed away this August in Anchorage, Alaska, where his sister, Liz, lived.  Liz was never able to visit him in Guatemala and therefore knows very little about his work and the years that he spent there.  She would love to hear from you if you have stories and experiences to share.  She can be reached at:
 
Elisabeth Holmgren Architect
LEED AP, Permaculture Certified
P 907.274.4242
F 907.274.4242
homeswithasoul@ak.net
 
Frank touched the lives of so many in Guatemala.  His dedication to and respect for the Maya and his warmth and willingness to share his experiences were central to so many of us.  My own understanding of Todos Santos and of Guatemala were so greatly enriched through his accounts, memories and astute observations — and through accompanying him in his work —  that I can't imagine what it would have meant to not have him as a close friend and intellectual interlocutor.  
 
Jennifer L Burrell, Ph.D
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
University at Albany SUNY

 

 
3.       HUD BAY WILL NOT APPEAL RULING ON THE SHIFT TO CANADA OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE CASES
 

HudBay won’t appeal ruling bringing Guatemala case to Canada

ALEXANDRA POSADZKI. Canadian Press. August 30, 2013

A Canadian mining company has decided not to appeal a ruling that will allow three lawsuits it is facing over alleged shootings and gang rapes at a Guatemalan project to be tried in Canada.

Lawyer Robert Harrison confirmed in an e-mail on Friday that HudBay Minerals Inc. has chosen not to appeal the Ontario Superior Court ruling issued last month.

The ruling makes it possible for firms to face liability at home for incidents that occur abroad.

One of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs – 13 Mayan Guatemalans – said he was surprised by the decision because he said so far the mining company has fought “tooth and nail” at every step in the process.

Cory Wanless said the case will now proceed to the discovery phase, with trial still several years away.

The suits allege that security personnel, along with members of the police and military, attacked and raped 11 women in 2007 who were forcibly removed from their village in relation to the Fenix project.

Two related lawsuits seek to hold HudBay Minerals and a subsidiary responsible for the subsequent killing of community leader Adolfo Ich as a result of a land dispute and the shooting and paralysis of local resident German Chub.

HudBay, which didn’t own the mining operations when most of the alleged incidents occurred, has said the accusations contradict available information and that it would defend itself “vigorously against them.”

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

The Toronto-based company bought the Fenix project nickel mine in Guatemala in a corporate takeover of Skye Resources in 2008, but sold it in 2011 to Russian firm Solway Investment Group to focus on its Canadian and Peruvian projects.

Mr. Harrison said the company decided that allowing the cases to proceed to trial was the best course of action.

“HudBay is confident it will succeed on the merits,” Mr. Harrison said in an e-mail.

Mr. Wanless said this case has potentially far reaching implications for Canadian firms.

“We think that this has broad implications for the Canadian mining industry,” he said. “I think that Canadian executives should take note.”

 

 
4.       NEW FROM F&G/ PLAZA PUBLICA A MONOGRAPH ON THE CIVIL WAR ATTACKS ON LA “U” DURING THE 80S
 
http://www.fygeditores.com/emails/PlazaPublica/elcoronel_info.jpg
 
Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
Baylor University
(254) 710-6226
 



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