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GSN MONDAY MAILER FEBRUARY 18 2013

Posted by administrador on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 in News.

1.       GREAT LEGAL AID TO MAYA SPEAKERS ON THE BORDER NEEDS YOUR HELP

2.       NEW RESOURCE ON GENOCIDE INCLUDING ESSAY FROM GSN’ER SUSANNE JONAS

3.       NEW RESOURCE ON GENOCIDE INCLUDING ESSAY FROM GSN’ER SUSANNE JONAS

4.       SUPPORT CIRMA’S MAJOR STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

 

 

 

1.       GREAT LEGAL AID TO MAYA SPEAKING CHILDREN ON THE BORDER NEEDS YOUR HELP


My name is Angel Escamilla and I'm a paralegal at ProBAR (The South Texas Pro Bono Asylum Representation Project). I write seeking support in translating legal information for detained migrant children on the U.S.-Mexico border into Mayan languages. ProBar is a law office operating as part of the American Bar Association that works in South Texas providing legal aid to undocumented migrant children that are detained crossing the border. In our work, we provide essential legal information to minors about their legal status and options as detainees; in some cases we also provide legal representation.

The number of children crossing the US-Mexico border is constant and increasing every day, and a significant portion of this population, approximately 15%, are speakers off Mayan languages from Central America. Providing legal services to speakers of these languages presents a challenge because we only have two options for communicating with them: one is in Spanish, and the other is via an interpreting firm (Pacific Interpreters), who we call over the phone and use in a 3 way call. Both of these options have problems. Communicating with the minors in Spanish is only sometimes possible, depending on previous exposure to Spanish, and, even then, can become confusing when using technical or unfamiliar terms. Issues with the Interpreting solution arise because sometimes the interpreter is unavailable. Pacific Interpreters also has limited interpreters, and they do not cover every Mayan language. As you can see, our hands are strapped when trying to fully communicate the rights and legal options to detained migrant minors who speak languages other than Spanish.

Therefore, I have proposed and am currently leading a project at our firm to create audio tracks in Mayan languages that explain the legal options of detained migrant minors in the United States. I received the name of the Guatemalan Scholars Network from Emilio Escalante del Valle of UNC, who has helped us in the past, and I was wondering if you would have any further contacts or names of individuals who may be able to aid us in translating materials or creating audio tracks for our project. We are seeking to complete this project by June in order to aid the children we serve as soon as possible.

Please feel free to contact me in the most convenient way possible, either by email (angel.garcia@americanbar.org) or by phone 956-365-3775, ext. 217, and if you would like to know more about our organization, here are two links to explore:

http://www.americanbar.org/groups/public_services/immigration/projects_initiatives/south_texas_pro_bono_asylum_representation_project_probar.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/us/more-young-illegal-immigrants-face-deportation.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Thank you for your time,

Angel Alfonso Escamilla Garcia

 

 

2.       NEW RESOURCE ON GENOCIDE INCLUDING ESSAY FROM GSN’ER SUSANNE JONAS

Since there's so much on the Rios Montt trial right now, I wanted to let you know about another resource (to include in next mailer to GSN list): Guatemalan Case in Book/Textbook on Genocides Worldwide:

Samuel Totten and William Parsons (associated with the Holocaust Museum in Washington) have published the 4th edition (2013) of Centuries of Genocide: Essays and Eyewitness Accounts. For both the 3rd and 4th editions, they included the Guatemalan case, which I have written. My chapter is "Guatemala: Acts of Genocide and Scorched-Earth Counterinsurgency War." In addition to an analytical essay, the chapter includes testimonies from survivors — and an update (as of Simmer, 2012) on the current campaigns in both Guatemala and Spain for justice for the victims' families and survivors, and the trials of Rios Montt. For information about the book, go to the Routledge Press link: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415871921/

 

 

3.       PROGRAM FOR 9TH ANNUAL CENTRAL AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY CONFERENCE (SEE ATTACHED)

 

 

4.       SUPPORT CIRMA’S MAJOR STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

From CIRMA–Support the preservation of historical memory    in Guatemala, Promote Study Abroad

Dear Colleagues, 

With our Summer and Fall semester 2013 deadlines fast approaching, I am again writing with an appeal for your support for CIRMA, el Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica, in Antigua, Guatemala.  I joined the program as Director just last year as a recent PhD from UC Berkeley Geography but also as a seasoned popular educator and participant action researcher with over two decades of experience working in the El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.  Most of you probably remember participating in a Study Abroad Program and how it changed your worldview. My commitment is that the CIRMA-University of Arizona Program guarantee that process, continue to combine rigorous study with deep practical engagement and critical reflection and weave with the Library and Archives in such a way as to strengthen the transformative power of both.

All you need to do is make your students and Study Abroad Office aware of the unique dual role that the CIRMA/University of Arizona Study Abroad Program plays.

CIRMA is a Guatemalan non-profit foundations dedicated to preserving national historical memory, and to carrying out and promoting the high quality training and research of leaders in Mesoamerican social science. CIRMAs institutional resources and activities contribute to the development of critical thought and the practice of constructive dialogue with the goal of promoting a more just and tolerant society. CIRMA’s comprehensive social science collection houses national and international publications about Central America, especially of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries and is used extensively by national and international scholars. In addition to the social science library which is one of the largest of its genre in the region, CIRMA houses an Historical Archive with over 7,500,000 documents that include guerrilla, human rights and counterinsurgency documentation of Guatemala’s 36 year civil war, and the largest Photographic Archive in Guatemala with over 1,000,000 photos documenting Guatemalan history from 1850 to the present.

The University of Arizona Study Abroad Program at CIRMA in Antigua, Guatemala not only provides students with a transformational pedagogical experience based on the inseparability of theory and practice, including direct engagement with the archives, but it provides vital economic support to CIRMA’s social science library, historical archives and fototeca.

The CIRMA/University of Arizona Study Abroad Program offers fully accredited Spring and Fall semester programs as well as a 6 wk intensive Summer semester. In addition to University of Arizona students CIRMA-U of A has helped transform the lives of students from a wide array of universities and colleges across the United States and Canada such as Yale University, University of North Dakota, Skidmore College, and Fort Lewis College.

Please help us to continue our dual mission of sustaining the valuable work of preserving the historical memory of the past and educating US and Central American thinkers of tomorrow.  Forward the following to prospective students and check to see if your Study Abroad Office accepts our program.  

CIRMA-University of Arizona Study Abroad Program in Antigua, Guatemala

Deepen your understanding of the social, historical and political dynamics of Guatemala and Central America and learn Spanish while living in a fascinating colonial town. The semester programs and six-week summer intensive program provide undergraduate, honors and graduate college credits from the University of Arizona and are open to students from any university.  Each semester two social science/history courses are offered that combine classwork with exposure to the Archives.  In the last two years we have offered: Mesoamerican Archaeology, History of Central American Revolutions, Narratives of Identity and Nation in Guatemala, Archives, Historical Memory and Transitional Justice in Guatemala and El Salvador, Globalization, Development and the Making of Modern Guatemala, and Climate Change, Resource Conflicts and Not-So-Natural Disasters as well as Independent Study in Critical Global Health. The program also includes Spanish Language and Literature every semester and Maya-Kaq’chikel when there is interest.

All courses are taught by knowledgeable scholars, either from Central America or having long histories in the region. They are designed to promote an understanding of Central America based on the inseparability of theory and everyday practice.  Formal classes are complemented by field trips to archaeological sites such as Tikal and communities seeking to recover and or preserve collective historical memory such as Rio Negro.  Studies also include a colloquium series that introduces students to key public figures, artists, and analysts. Students have access to CIRMA's unique documentary and photographic collections and the option of interning (for credit) with one of CIRMA’s research archives and library, or with social outreach programs in areas such as health, sustainable agriculture, and child and infant services.  Homestay and optional one-on-one exchanges with a Guatemalan university students complement the learning experience.

For more information check out the program at www.studyabroad.arizona.edu and/or www.cirma.org.gt or write Academic Coordinator Jennifer Casolo, jcasolo@cirma.org.gt or University of Arizona Study Abroad Coordinator, Jill Calderón, jcaldero@email.arizona.edu.

Thanks, Jenn

Jennifer Casolo, PhD
Directora y Catedrática de Geografía
CIRMA-Programa Study Abroad

5a. Calle Oriente No. 5

Antigua, Guatemala
Tel: (502) 7832-8225
Fax: (502) 7832-2083
Email: jcasolo@cirma.org.gt

Investigadora Asociada
Instituto de Estudios Humanísticos
Universidad Rafael Landívar
Zona 16, Ciudad de Guatemala
Tel: (502) 5997-9638

Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology

Baylor University

(254) 710-6226

 

PROGRAMA GENERAL-IXCCA.pdf PROGRAMA GENERAL-IXCCA.pdf
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