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GSN MONDAY MAILER FEBRUARY 11 2013

Posted by administrador on Monday, February 11, 2013 in News.

1.       GSN’ERS AVANCSO NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (LONG BUT WORTH IT)

 

2.       INDIGENOUS PUEBLOS ASSESS PEREZ MOLINA’S FIRST YEAR

3.       EXCELLENT OP-ED PIECE BY GSN’ER VICTORIA STANFORD

4.       ANOTHER EXCELLENT OP-ED PIECE FROM LA TIMES BY GSN’ER MARY JO MCCONAHAY

5.       ATTACHED 1: GREAT PIECE ON OIL INTERESTS IN LIVINGSTON

6.       ATTACHED 2: AVAILABLE YEAR ROUND INTERNSHIPS AND RESEARCH ON LAKE ATITLAN

7.       MEMBERSHIP DUES UPDATE
 

 


 
1.       GSN’ERS AVANCSO NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (LONG BUT WORTH IT
 
APPEAL IN SUPPORT OF AVANCSO
 
            Donations are needed to help AVANCSO rebuild after a suspicious break-in, in which all their computers were stolen. Many GSN members have done research and published with AVANCSO, and all of us benefit from the opening for social science research and praxis that AVANCSO has helped create and defend. Please see below for how you can help. Por favor, disculpen que la carta esté escrita en inglés.

 

In the middle of the night between January 17 and 18, the offices of the Association for the Advancement of the Social Sciences in Guatemala (AVANCSO) suffered a destructive break-in. After drugging the nightwatchman unconscious, the intruders stole some 30 computers, along with disks, flash drives, and digital cameras. The intruders also rifled through paper files.

In a January 18 statement, AVANCSO noted that the goal of the break-in appeared to be to steal research information and intimidate the organization, since other valuable equipment (scanners, etc) was left untouched. "This is a clear message against the critical social sciences in Guatemala," the AVANCSO statement concluded.
Please see below for what you can do to help.
 
Why is AVANCSO so important?
Since its inception as an independent research center in 1986, AVANCSO works to create a space for social science research in Guatemlaa, focusing on long-term ethnographic fieldwork and careful archival investigation, as well as mentoring and training a generation of younger scholars. AVANCSO's mission is to help repair the intellecual fabric of the country, in a context in which more than 100 university professors were assassinated during Guatemala's armed conflict, and university-level field research collapsed. AVANCSO strives to create and preserve a space for critical thinking around the central issues of rural and urban development, historical memory, ethnic relations, violence and democratization, and identity. Its work includes dozens of books and hundreds of articles and working papers.

AVANCSO’s contribution goes far beyond these publications, however.  Its researchers are dedicated to building relationships with a wide range of national organizations and to producing useful knowledge so that those organizations may contribute to a broad debate on development alternatives. As such, AVANCSO has become a vital node in the struggle to create political openings in Guatemala.
 
Scholars and human rights groups protest attack against AVANCSO.
Following the January break-in, many sectors in Guatemala and abroad protested what is seen as an attack against AVANCSO, and, by extension, against intellectual freedom in Guatemala:
 
–On January 19, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights issued a statement in support of AVANCSO, expressing "concern over the possibility that this could be an attack against the academic work that AVANCSO has carried out for over 25 years, which has been and is key to understanding and promoting many of the social processes in support of peace and the respect of human rights in Guatemala."
 
–On January 21, The Myrna Mack Foundation, one of Guatemala's leading human rights organizations, noted that the AVANCSO break-in followed a pattern of intimidation against individuals and organizations involved in critical intellectual and development projects in Guatemala.

—-On January 23, 100 international scholars and research centers published a paid in the Guatemalan daily newspaper El Periódico expressing support for AVANCSO and calling for a thorough investigation and prosecution of those responsible, as "the only way to ensure that the abuses of the past against scientific and intellectual life in Guatemala will not be repeated."

–On January 25, the Guatemalan Catholic Bishop's Conference issued a statement in solidarity with AVANCSO, expressing a worry that the break-in could be a sign of a "strategy of persecution and harassment against those who struggle to defend human rights, thus returning to the nefarious practices of the past."

–On January 30, a group of Guatemalan scholars held a press conference to express solidarity with AVANCSO. They noted that a letter calling for an investigation, signed by more than 500 Guatemalan and international scholars, intellectuals, artists and social and feminist leaders, had been presented to President Otto Peréz Molina and to the Guatemalan Justice Department.

–A number of Guatemalan scholars published Op-Eds in the Guatemalan press expressing admiration for AVANCSO's work, decrying the apparent effort to stifle critical thinking, and calling on authorities to investigate the attack.
 
This is not the first time AVANCSO has been targeted.

–In 1990, the research institute's co-founder, Guatemalan anthropologist Myrna Mack, was stabbed to death by an army death squad outside AVANCSO's office in Guatemala City. Myrna Mack had been investigating the situation of Mayan communities displaced by army massacres in the early 1980s (the Myrna Mack murder became a major human rights case in Guatemala, eventually leading to the conviction of an army sergeant in 1993 and a colonel in 2002). 
–On the night of March 20, 2002, armed men forced their way into the AVANCSO building. The men entered the offices of the Agrarian Team, without visibly removing anything.

–On June 7, 2002, a faxed death threat sent to numerous organizations in Guatemala named AVANCSO director Clara Arenas, along with Myrna Mack's sister, human rights activist Helen Mack, and nine others. During this period, AVANCSO detected continuous surveillance outside its offices, and at times outside the homes of some of its personnel.
 
Here's how you can help:

It is vital that AVANCSO not be forced to close its doors. The most important contribution right now is to help AVANCSO replace its stolen computers and research equipment. Over the past few weeks, GSN members donated and brought to AVANCSO a dozen laptops, although this is only an emergency stopgap measure. The Guatemalan Scholars Network is starting a support fund to help AVANCSO get back on its feet. So far, more than $10,000 has been raised for AVANCSO through foundational and individual support (a big shout-out to Marcie Mersky for her fundaising work). The goal is to raise an additional $10,000 so that AVANCSO can buy new computers and other research supplies. This is important material and moral support for our colleagues who face a devastating blow to their research projects. Let's stand by AVANCSO so we can continue to count on their cutting-edge critical research. If every GSN member gave $35, we could raise the additional amount AVANCSO needs….

The Guatemalan Scholars Network is receiving donations in support of AVANCSO. Checks can be made out to: Guatemala Scholars Network, and sent to Liz Oglesby, c/o Center for Latin American Studies, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210076, Tucson, AZ 85721. Please be sure to make the check out to Guatemala Scholars Network; donations will be bundled by GSN and wired to AVANCSO in Guatemala. Donations are tax deductible. For more information (or if you have connections with a foundation that might want to make a grant), please email Liz Oglesby at eoglesby@email.arizona.edu.

 


 
2.       INDIGENOUS PUEBLOS ASSESS PEREZ MOLINA’S FIRST YEAR
 
LAS ORGANIZACIONES DEL COLECTIVO PRO DERECHOS DE LOS PUEBLOS INDIGENAS A LA OPINIÓN PÚBLICA NACIONAL E INTERANCIONAL.

 

HACEN SABER QUE

A un año del Gobierno del General Otto Pérez Molina, las comunidades, organizaciones pro derechos humanos, mujeres, jóvenes, líderes, lideresas y académicos de los pueblos Maya, Xinka, Garífuna, Ladino o Mestizo; experimentamos un retroceso radical en la incipiente institucionalidad del Estado de Derecho y en los compromisos asumidos por el Gobierno de Guatemala a través de los Acuerdos de Paz, que constituyen derechos adquiridos por los pueblos originarios y sectores sociales históricamente olvidados.

Nos preocupa que la política del actual Gobierno de la República, favorezca y proteja a las grandes empresas transnacionales de minería a cielo abierto, minerías, de níquel, petróleo, hidroeléctricas y empresas productoras de palma africana; quienes han despojado y desplazado a los pueblos indígenas de sus territorios ancestrales, irrespetando la vida humana, las fuentes vitales de la madre naturaleza y las pequeñas propiedades de los habitantes de comunidades mayoritariamente indígenas y mujeres. Situación que agudiza la pobreza, extrema pobreza y la hambruna.

Estamos sumamente preocupadas-os por la militarización de nuestros territorios ancestrales y la sociedad en general, al crear destacamentos militares, “fuerzas de tareas” y patrullajes del ejército, estrategias de la política contrainsurgente practicadas durante el conflicto armado interno, el cual refleja una incapacidad del Gobierno de resolver la conflictividad económica, social, política, educativa y agraria, a través del diálogo y la paz.

Nos preocupa que desde el 23 de enero, la comunidad Las Trojes I de San Juan Sacatepéquez, se encuentra asediada por el personal de seguridad de la empresa Cementos Progreso, quien está cavando un pozo mecánico que afectará aún más el caudal del agua del pozo de la comunidad.

Han aumentado las amenazas a líderes y lideresas sociales, como el caso más reciente del Coordinador del Comité de Unidad Campesina –CUC- Daniel Pascual, y otros como los ocurridos a Juan Zet, Domingo Hernández Ixcoy y Lolita Chávez.

La reforma a la carrera magisterial planteada por el actual gobierno, elimina 21 Escuelas Normales de Educación Bilingüe Intercultural. Con esta medida el Estado de Guatemala viola el derecho al estudio de los idiomas, los conocimientos y los valores de la cultura de los pueblos indígenas, y en consecuencia, aleja a la juventud indígena, ladina o mestiza, del derecho de acceder a una carrera magisterial orientada a desarrollar una educación acorde al carácter multiétnico, pluricultural y multilingüe establecida en el diálogo y Consenso Nacional para la Reforma Educativa, en el año 2001.

La reforma del Acuerdo Gubernativo 525–99 de fecha 19 de julio de 1999 que creó la Defensoría de la Mujer Indígena (DEMI) por el Acuerdo Gubernativo 38–2013, publicado el 24 de enero de 2013, con el cual se elimina de tajo el mecanismo de participación y representación de las organizaciones de mujeres indígenas en uno de los niveles decisorios, en la elección de candidatas para el Cargo de la Defensora de la Mujer Indígena. Estableciendo la responsabilidad exclusiva de la Presidencia de la República en la elección de la Defensora de la Mujer Indígena, es otro revés al proceso de la paz y la democratización del país.

POR LO ANTERIOR, DEMANDAMOS: Al Presidente de la República, General Otto Pérez Molina, su apego al Estado de Derecho democrático y participativo para corregir el rumbo equivocado de su política de inclusión asistencialista, paternalista, partidista, folklórica y mercantilista con que se ha tratado a los pueblos indígenas y las mujeres. Suspender los proyectos mineros, hidroeléctricos, petroleros y de palma africana, por los irreversibles daños ocasionados a la madre naturaleza, los niños, las mujeres y la población en general. Apoyar al Ministerio Público para que investigue de oficio y castigue a los responsables de amenazas y persecuciones dirigidas a líderes y lideresas sociales. Asimismo asumir el compromiso de resolver la conflictividad social por medios pacíficos y no a través de la represión como se ha estado haciendo hasta la fecha. Garantizar la representación de las mujeres, la juventud y los Pueblos Indígenas en los espacios de toma de decisiones nacionales. Impulsar un proceso de consulta en los territorios indígenas afectados por el cambio a la carrera magisterial, tal y como lo estipula el Convenio 169 de la OIT, y como actualmente lo están demandando 21 escuelas normales bilingües interculturales. Cesar la criminalización de la lucha de los pueblos indígenas y las mujeres, ya que no contribuye en nada a buscar soluciones efectivas a sus demandas.

Integrantes del Colectivo pro Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas
Consejo de Organizaciones Mayas de Guatemala, COMG.
Asociación Política de Mujeres Mayas, MOLOJ.
Fundación Rigoberta Menchú Tum, FRMT.
Defensoría Indígena PDH.
Asociación Guatemalteca de Alcaldes y Autoridades Indígenas, AGAII.
Defensa Legal Indígena, DLI.
Consejo Nacional de Educación Maya, CNEM.
Organismo Indígena para la Planificación de Desarrollo, NALEB’.
Defensoría Maya, DEMA.
Asociación de Abogados y Notarios Mayas de Guatemala, NIM AJPU.
Asociación POP NO’J.
Movimiento de Radios Comunitarias de Guatemala.
PRO-169.
Unidad de Pueblos Indígenas en la CSJ.
Paxil Kayala’ Waqi Imox, 31 de enero del año 2013. ¡No a la violencia institucional contra las mujeres, la juventud y los pueblos indígenas!

 


3.       EXCELLENT OP-ED PIECE BY GSN’ER VICTORIA STANFORD
 
Excellent op-ed piece by Victoria Sanford.
Rompiendo el muro de impunidad en Guatemala

 

http://www.elfaro.net/es/201302/opinion/10883/


 
4.       ANOTHER EXCELLENT OP-ED PIECE FROM LA TIMES BY GSN’ER MARY JO MCCONAHAY
 
This essay of mine ran in the LA Times today — it might be of interest for the Monday GSN newsletter?  http://tinyurl.com/a4tr23w
thanks
Mary Jo
 
415 269 4755
http://www.mayaroads.com


 
5.       ATTACHED 1: GREAT PIECE ON OIL INTERESTS IN LIVINGSTON
6.       ATTACHED 2: AVAILABLE YEAR ROUND INTERSHSIPS AND RESEARCH ON LAKE ATITLAN

 


 
 
7.       MEMBERSHIP DUES UPDATE
 
– just got an influx of dues this week so a thank you (and will probably get a few more):
 
Thanks to all of you who have submitted your GSN dues payments for 2013!  For information on how to submit your dues please see http://www.vanderbilt.edu/gsn/annual-membership-dues
 
Avery Dickins de Girón, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Center for Latin American Studies
Vanderbilt University
avery.dickins-degiron@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-1750


Thomas A. Offit Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
Baylor University
(254) 710-6226
 
2 attachments — Download all attachments  
Enfoque 24, Livingston y los intereses petroleros.pdf Enfoque 24, Livingston y los intereses petroleros.pdf
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Natik Service Learning and Internships.pdf Natik Service Learning and Internships.pdf
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