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Monday, May 12, 2003

This morning:

- Debate on the President's tax cut continues to lead the political news in Washington. The final size of this cut is almost certain to impact funds available for research, homeland security and student aid programs.

- On Wednesday, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee will consider Senator Alexander's bill to establish academies for teachers and students to study American civics and history. This is a significant step towards making this bill law. Efforts in the House to move the legislation forward must follow as a next step. Momentum also is building in the Senate to pass a bill that would authorize an increase in funds for federally sponsored nanotechnology research at a number of agencies.

- In the news:

PROPOSALS SOUGHT FOR TEACHER QUALITY GRANTS

STUDY: THE BIG MONEY IN HOMELAND SECURITY IS IN OTHER AGENCIES

MEDICARE REIMBURSEMENT FORMULA HAS DOCTORS ON DEFENSIVE AGAIN

NIAID EXPECTED TO DIVERT $233 MILLION TO VACCINE PROCUREMENT

SMALLPOX STRATEGIES SHIFTING

NEW MANAGER SELECTED FOR SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM

Archived DC Briefs:

Security Concerns Spark Debate on Openness in Research

By Sarah Walkling
October 23, 2002

This is the third in a series of reports outlining how the war on terrorism has affected federal policy involving research universities. The first report dealt with upcoming changes in the way all student visas will be processed and tracked; the
second looked at the narrower issue of access by foreign students to sensitive areas of study.


More than a year later, the shockwaves of the tragic events of September 11 continue to raise questions about how Americans should carry on with their lives while both preventing future terrorist attacks and preserving the freedoms and values so unique to the United States. Nowhere is this more obvious than in recent debates over the delicate balance between openness in scientific research and national security. Reflecting the pressing importance of this issue, a congressional committee heard views of both sides at a hearing earlier this month.

The issue of balance between academic freedom and national security has arisen several times in American history. After World War II, physicists agreed to keep a lid on nuclear fission and microwave research. In the mid-1970s, the National Security Agency pressured cryptographers to pull papers on new algorithms. In the late 1990s, the Department of Energy experienced high-profile security lapses at its national laboratories. This spring, following criticism from researchers, the Pentagon backed away (at least for the time being) from efforts to impose new controls on basic research funded by the Department of Defense. Most recently, the Department of Agriculture asked the National Academy of Sciences to put an
Read more

Archived DC Reports:



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