NR is excited to feature the following short story by Mira Apricita, a participant in an expressive writing workshop for those impacted by cancer. The Express Yourself Writing Workshops, led by MFA student Claire Jimenez, are a collaboration between the Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, the Curb Center and Gilda’s Club. For more information, email Claire at claire.d.jimenez@vanderbilt.edu.

Ariel

by Mira Apricita

Among other “favorite” questions, my children often ask me who my favorite princess is. Of course they don’t mean a real princess, like the one of England or of the few kingdoms still existing. They mean Disney princesses.

So, I shuffle in my head the ones I know: Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Ariel, and Belle. How can I possibly choose!? What comes to mind is their hair and dress color. Well, it seems like it all comes down to choosing colors, since behind the appearance there is no character. In their Disney stories, the princesses are the beautiful figures to which something quite unfair happens, they get in trouble, and then some noble prince comes to their rescue. So they really don’t have to do anything, but be so incredibly beautiful to inspire a battle to reset the fairness. Only the story of Ariel is different…

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NR Spotlight: East Side Story

by Claire Jimenez and Anne Charlton

Settled in a city famous for its music, a small organization with the goal of promoting Nashville’s literary scene seeks to give writers and readers a place to come together. This is East Side Story—more an idea than a business, more a network than a building.

East Side Story’s proprietor, Chuck Beard, hails from Bowling Green, Kentucky. Though he spent time in central Kentucky, attending Centre College, Beard claims the Nashville area as his “cultural and entertainment education.” East Side Story began when Chuck entered an idea into a contest…


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Nashville Review is proud to share the following short stories written by Nashville teenagers Rin Willocks and George Foster-Williams. Rin and George participated in a two month long weekly fiction workshop taught by NR’s Claire Jimenez.

<h3>Find</h3>
by <strong><a href=”http://www.vanderbilt.edu/english/nashvillereview/archives/6330″>Rin Willocks</a></strong>
It was freshman year, my very first day of high school. I pressed myself into an old writing desk in Mr. Copper’s room first thing in the morning getting ready to suck at Spanish. The night before, I had decided to wear my favorite shirt. I had bought it on a white water rafting trip the previous summer. It was tie dye with a rainbow peace sign; the words “Peace, Love, and Paddle” danced on it in bold letters.

Find

by Rin Willocks

It was freshman year, my very first day of high school. I pressed myself into an old writing desk in Mr. Copper’s room first thing in the morning getting ready to suck at Spanish. The night before, I had decided to wear my favorite shirt. I had bought it on a white water rafting trip the previous summer. It was tie dye with a rainbow peace sign; the words “Peace, Love, and Paddle” danced on it in bold letters.

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Lost Love

by George Foster-Williams

Here I am, sitting in front of Principal Karen again, getting one of her famous “You know better” lectures. She’s redder than usual. I must have did it now.

“What am I going to do with you, Gregory?”

“You tell me, Principal Karen.”

“You’re not a bad student by a long shot, you’re one of the top students in the whole 7th grade, you join organizations, why are you – “

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

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