Lyrical Brew: An Evening of Local Poetry, Friday June 27

This month’s Lyrical Brew features poetry from The Contributor, Nashville’s homeless/formerly homeless newspaper.

7:00-8:30PM, Friday July 25, in the Barnes & Noble at Vanderbilt University,
2501 W End Ave, Nashville, Tennessee 37203

Link to the Facebook Event

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Nashville Review is proud to share the following short stories written by Nashville teenagers McKenna Meldrum and Elia Perez. These stories emerge from a program developed by the Nashville Public Library and Southern Word, where NR’s Claire Jimenez taught. Learn more at library.nashville.org and southernword.org.

Seen

By McKenna Meldrum

Driving in a car that has no heating in the middle of winter is one of the shittiest parts of my life, and that’s saying something. I live in a small, nowhere, who gives a damn town, so back roads are always a safe bet to get somewhere in a hurry, or a good place to display teen angst through shenanigans in the middle of the night. Most farms are off the beaten trail. Children sneak onto the fields and make sport of stealing the most eggs from the hen huts or scaring the goats to make them yelp and faint. The most dangerous of these farm antics is the tradition of sneaking the largest cow off the farm, taking it to the school, and walking it to the top level of the building as a prank. This ritual is not only tolerated, but also expected since even the elders at the nursing home did it in their youth.


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Jane’s Cage

by Elia Perez

Jane walked into the hotel lobby, her eyes burning from the sleepless nights she’d suffered the past couple of days. The heel of her boots made sharp angry quarter notes that echoed off the marble floor, as she headed for the coffee bar tucked neatly off to the side of the lobby. Her boots made a dull thud with every step as she walked on the shop’s carpeting; the aroma of coffee that had once brought her such joy had been reduced to merely another pollutant in her environment by the events of the past few days.

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Ghost Gear, by Andrew McFadyen Ketchum, Release Reading

Nashville Native Andrew McFadyen Ketchum will be reading from his debut collection of poems, signing books, and y’all are invited to enjoy an open bar.

July 19th, doors open at 6:30pm, reading begins at 7PM, Parnassus Books, 3900 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville, Tennessee 37215.


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Line Breaks Literary Reading Series hosting the “Honey Badgers Don’t Give a B**k Tour.”

Debut authors, Michelle Chan Brown (Double Agent, Kore Press), Cathy Linh Che (Split, Alice James Books), and Sally Wen Mao (Mad Honey Symposium, Alice James Books) will be reading.

Followed the next day by Magpie Poetry: A Generative Workshop

Reading August 1, 7:30pm Workshop August 2, 10:00AM, both at the Global Education Center, 4822 Charlotte Avenue, 37209-3423

Info at http://honeybadgersdontgiveabooktour.tumblr.com/

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Lyrical Brew: Poetry Meets Medicine Friday June 27

This month’s Lyrical Brew features poetry by Vanderbilt’s medical community, including physician Brenda Butka and medical students Irene Mathieu and Kenneth Taubenslag!

7:00-8:30PM, Friday June 27, in the Barnes & Noble at Vanderbilt University,
2501 W End Ave, Nashville, Tennessee 37203


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Upcoming Radio Interview with Rick Hilles

Every Sunday morning from 10 am to noon, David Harris hosts the “Difficult Listening” radio show on WRFN-LONG, Radio Free Nashville, 107.1.

Sunday June 15th, Harris will be interviewing a special guest, Vanderbilt’s own, and NR’s much-adored, Rick Hilles.

Normally, Harris reads from a novel, plays music, then reads poems from a collection and comments on them.

The show that follows is Clearstory, hosted by River Jordan, for a literary doubleheader.

Be sure to tune in.


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NR is excited to feature the following short story by Mira Apricita, a participant in an expressive writing workshop for those impacted by cancer. The Express Yourself Writing Workshops, led by MFA student Claire Jimenez, are a collaboration between the Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, the Curb Center and Gilda’s Club. For more information, email Claire at claire.d.jimenez@vanderbilt.edu.

Ariel

by Mira Apricita

Among other “favorite” questions, my children often ask me who my favorite princess is. Of course they don’t mean a real princess, like the one of England or of the few kingdoms still existing. They mean Disney princesses.

So, I shuffle in my head the ones I know: Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Ariel, and Belle. How can I possibly choose!? What comes to mind is their hair and dress color. Well, it seems like it all comes down to choosing colors, since behind the appearance there is no character. In their Disney stories, the princesses are the beautiful figures to which something quite unfair happens, they get in trouble, and then some noble prince comes to their rescue. So they really don’t have to do anything, but be so incredibly beautiful to inspire a battle to reset the fairness. Only the story of Ariel is different…

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NR Spotlight: East Side Story

by Claire Jimenez and Anne Charlton

Settled in a city famous for its music, a small organization with the goal of promoting Nashville’s literary scene seeks to give writers and readers a place to come together. This is East Side Story—more an idea than a business, more a network than a building.

East Side Story’s proprietor, Chuck Beard, hails from Bowling Green, Kentucky. Though he spent time in central Kentucky, attending Centre College, Beard claims the Nashville area as his “cultural and entertainment education.” East Side Story began when Chuck entered an idea into a contest…


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Nashville Review is proud to share the following short stories written by Nashville teenagers Rin Willocks and George Foster-Williams. Rin and George participated in a two month long weekly fiction workshop taught by NR’s Claire Jimenez.

<h3>Find</h3>
by <strong><a href=”http://www.vanderbilt.edu/english/nashvillereview/archives/6330″>Rin Willocks</a></strong>
It was freshman year, my very first day of high school. I pressed myself into an old writing desk in Mr. Copper’s room first thing in the morning getting ready to suck at Spanish. The night before, I had decided to wear my favorite shirt. I had bought it on a white water rafting trip the previous summer. It was tie dye with a rainbow peace sign; the words “Peace, Love, and Paddle” danced on it in bold letters.

Find

by Rin Willocks

It was freshman year, my very first day of high school. I pressed myself into an old writing desk in Mr. Copper’s room first thing in the morning getting ready to suck at Spanish. The night before, I had decided to wear my favorite shirt. I had bought it on a white water rafting trip the previous summer. It was tie dye with a rainbow peace sign; the words “Peace, Love, and Paddle” danced on it in bold letters.

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Lost Love

by George Foster-Williams

Here I am, sitting in front of Principal Karen again, getting one of her famous “You know better” lectures. She’s redder than usual. I must have did it now.

“What am I going to do with you, Gregory?”

“You tell me, Principal Karen.”

“You’re not a bad student by a long shot, you’re one of the top students in the whole 7th grade, you join organizations, why are you – “

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

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