1. M. A. Adams, E. J. Barth. “Dynamic Modeling and Design of a Bulk-Loaded Liquid Monopropellant Powered Rifle”. ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, vol. 130, issue 6, pp.061001-1 – 061001-8, November 2008
  1. N. Gulati, E. J. Barth. “Dynamic Modeling of a Monopropellant-Based Chemofluidic Actuation System”. ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, vol. 129, no. 4, pp.435-445, July 2007.
  1. K. B. Fite, J. E. Mitchell, E. J. Barth, M. Goldfarb. “A Unified Force Controller for a Proportional-Injector Direct-Injection Monopropellant-Powered Actuator”. ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control, vol. 128, no. 1, pp. 159-164, March 2006.
  1. M. Goldfarb, E. J. Barth, M. A. Gogola, J. A. Wehrmeyer. “Design and Energetic Characterization of a Liquid-Propellant-Powered Actuator for Self-Powered Robots”. IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 254-262, June 2003.
  1. M. A. Adams and E. J. Barth. “A Compressible Fluid Power Dynamic Model of a Liquid Propellant Powered Rifle”. 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), IMECE2004-59620, November 13-19, 2004, Anaheim, CA.
  1. K. Fite, J. Mitchell, E. J. Barth, M. Goldfarb. “Design and Characterization of a Rotary Actuated Hot Gas Servovalve”. 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), IMECE2004-59727, November 13-19, 2004, Anaheim, CA.
  1. B. Li, E. J. Barth, K. Fite, M. Goldfarb. “Design of a Hot Gas Vane Motor”. 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), IMECE2004-59581, November 13-19, 2004, Anaheim, CA.
  1. K. Fite, J. Mitchell, E. J. Barth, M. Goldfarb. “Sliding mode control of a direct-injection monopropellant-powered actuator”. Proceedings of the 2004 American Control Conference (ACC), FrA16.6, June 30 - July 2 2004, pp. 4461-4466.
  1. B. L. Shields, E. J. Barth, M. Goldfarb. “Predictive Pressure Control of a Monopropellant Powered Actuator”. 2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), IMECE2003-42743, November 15-21, 2003, Washington, DC.
  1. M. Goldfarb, E. J. Barth, M. A. Gogola , J. A. Wehrmeyer. “Development of a Hot Gas Actuator for Self-Powered Robots”. Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA). Taipei, Taiwan, Sept. 14-19, pp. 188-193.
  1. E. J. Barth, M. A. Gogola, M. Goldfarb. “Modeling and Control of a Monopropellant-Based Pneumatic Actuation System”. Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA). Taipei, Taiwan, Sept. 14-19, pp. 628-633.
  1. E. J. Barth, M. A. Gogola, J. A. Wehrmeyer, M. Goldfarb. “The Design and Modeling of a Liquid-Propellant-Powered Actuator for Energetically Autonomous Robots”. 2002 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), IMECE2002-32080, November 17-22, 2002, New Orleans, LA.
  1. M. Gogola, E. J. Barth, M. Goldfarb. “Monopropellant Powered Actuators for use in Autonomous Human-Scaled Robotics”. Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), vol. 3, pp. 2357-2362.

Monopropellant Powered Systems

The motivation for this work is the development of a lightweight power supply and actuation system appropriate for untethered robotic platforms with system-level energy and power densities significantly greater than a DC motor and battery combination. Conventional actuation, such as a battery powered DC motor system, does not possess adequate energy density or power density to perform significant amounts of mechanical work for significant periods of time autonomously in a lightweight package. This monopropellant based approach utilizes the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce hot pressurized gas for the controlled delivery of mechanical work utilizing pneumatic actuators.

In contrast to our work on the free-piston engine compressor, the monopropellant based work seeks a solution at the opposite end of the chemically powered devices spectrum: low convertor mass with a lower energy density fuel vs. higher convertor mass with a high energy density source. The monopropellant approach utilizes a simple and compact energy convertor (catalyst pack) but a lower energy density source (70% hydrogen peroxide with 0.4MJ/kg lower heating value). The free-piston engine compressor requires an intricate energy convertor (the engine) but utilizes a fuel with an energy density two orders of magnitude higher (propane with 46MJ/kg lower heating value). Both design philosophies seek a high system-specific work output – that is, a large amount of controlled work output per unit mass of the fuel/convertor/actuator system.

 

Video


Peroxide Catalysis

On/Off Direct Injection

Liquid Valve + Catalyst

Predictive Direct Inj.

Centralized System

DI Exhaust Temp.

Hot Exhaust Valve

Monopropellant Gun

 

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