Transductive Access Catheter

Summary

The tissue of the human body is separated by planes separated by minimal fluid, and it is often desirable to enter into the space between these planes to perform procedures including delivery or removal of fluid/therapeutics. Accurately and harmlessly placing catheters within these planes is very difficult because of the very close proximity of the tissues -- often within 1mm. The Transductive Access Catheter System solves these problems by allowing the operator to insert a shallow beveled needle into the space of interest using a hollow inner catheter that is filled with saline to probe much like a "micro water hammer" to detect difference in resistance to flow at the tip of the catheter. The primary competing technology uses suction to pull on the outer tissue which increases the target space volume at the catheter; however this has limitations of tissue rigidity and thickness (PerDUCER, Comedicus). Due to the versatility across disciplines, a wide variety of applications for this catheter exist, which include: Pericardial Space Infusion or Drainage, Pleural Space Infusion or Drainage, Subdural and Epidural Infusion, and Intraocular Fluid Space Infusion or Drainage.

Inventors: 
Douglas SawyerMichael Barnett
Licensing manager: 
Mike Villalobos

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