Available Technologies

ADDITIONAL FILTERS

283 available technologies

Sliding Mode Control System for Steerable Needles

A team of Vanderbilt engineers has developed an advanced control system that is a first-ever 3D control system for delivering a bevel-based steerable needle to its intended target. The controller is also useful for (a) following a desired curved path through tissue; (b) accurately placing the needle tip at the physician's desired target, and (c) reaching obstructed targets using non-straight paths. Experiments in phantom tissue and ex-vivo liver have validated the concept. Experiments with targets that move due to tissue deformation have also been successful.

Diagnostic to Predict Paternal Premature Birth Risk Factors: Therapy Can Reduce Risk

Premature birth is the leading cause of neonatal death worldwide, affecting 13% of US infants (500,000 babies/year). Of great concern, premature birth cannot currently be reliably predicted or prevented. Existing risk factors and interventions for premature birth focus solely on maternal factors, thereby overlooking paternal factors that influence an infant's development. Vanderbilt researchers have now identified a missing piece of the puzzle and are developing a diagnostic test to predict premature birth risks conferred to infants by their fathers. Of key importance, the test offers meaningful clinical guidance, as risk factors measured by the diagnostic can be modified before conception via supplementation.

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills small colony variants -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.

Prognostic Test Identifies Infants at High-Risk for Severe Respiratory Infection

Dr. Fernando P. Polack, a leading international researcher in pediatric infectious diseases, has discovered a new prognostic to predict which infants are at high-risk for hospitalization caused by severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infections. The test measures a mutation in a single gene, along with a quantifiable environmental factor that confers susceptibility. The goal is to categorize infants most likely to benefit from preventative care.

KidSense Car Seat Safety System for Unattended Child Detection and Temperature Monitoring

A Vanderbilt engineering senior design team has developed a car seat safety attachment that detects if a child has been left unattended in a car seat and if the environment has become uncomfortably hot or cold. The system is designed with a graduated alarm system based on "alert states" that provides a combination of visual, tactile and audio alerts.

Colorectal Cancer Risk Screening Assay

The overall lifetime colorectal cancer risk for Americans is 5.1%, thus screening is recommended for those over the age of 50. Currently, colonoscopies are the standard for monitoring colon cancer development, but are invasive. Therefore, a need exists for a minimally-invasive test that could measure colon cancer risk. Ideally, such a test would offer a straightforward, personalized recommendation on how to substantially reduce colorectal cancer risk. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have identified a test that can characterize colorectal cancer risk and recommend a strategy for risk reduction. Importantly, this test requires only a blood sample and information about a person's diet.

Gene Signature Diagnostic to Measure LKB1 Loss and MEK Inhibitor Sensitivity

A Vanderbilt research group has discovered a diagnostic to identify patients with non-small cell lung cancer that would respond to MEK inhibitor therapies. This diagnostic indirectly measures loss of tumor suppressor activity by the protein LKB1. The traditional approach to determine MEK inhibitor sensitivity, which is measurement of LKB1 mutations, misses 50% of patients who would benefit from these drugs. This diagnostic measures expression of a small panel of genes to identify a larger population that is sensitive to MEK inhibition.

Featured Video

Vanderbilt Patent Activity

View Vanderbilt University Patents

CTTC on Twitter